Prof' Andrew Isserman University of Illinois - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Prof' Andrew Isserman University of Illinois PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 245ec2-ODdjZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Prof' Andrew Isserman University of Illinois

Description:

'Strong potential exists for a growing relationship between agricultural ... gambling, land use change, urban agriculture, home gardening, sports stadiums ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:50
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 42
Provided by: andrewi5
Learn more at: http://www.cfare.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Prof' Andrew Isserman University of Illinois


1
Enhancing Economic Opportunities in Rural Areas
  • Education, Research, and Extension

2
My Home Away from Home
  • Community Economic Analysis A How-To Manual
  • Community Economics Economic Structure and
    Change in Smaller Communities 60

3
A Parallel Universe
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Regional Science / Regional Economics

Strong potential exists for a growing
relationship between agricultural economics and
regional science. Regional scientists,
particularly regional economists, might have no
closer kin than agricultural economists, and the
marriage of regional, resource, environmental,
and rural development economics could be a very
fruitful one.
4
Journal Structure
5
Journal Structure
6
Journal StructureRS
7
Journal StructureRS
8
Most Cited Papers in Ag Econ
9
Most Cited Papers in Ag Econ
10
Most Cited Papers in Ag Econ
11
Most Cited Papers in Ag Econ
12
Enhancing Opportunities in Rural Areas?
  • UNDOCUMENTED MEXICO-UNITED-STATES MIGRATION AND
    THE RETURNS TO HOUSEHOLDS IN RURAL MEXICO
  • DO ROADS CAUSE DEFORESTATION? USING SATELLITE
    IMAGES IN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF LAND USE
  • FARM DIVERSIFICATION AND RURAL-DEVELOPMENT
  • THE VILLAGE AGAINST THE CENTER - RESOURCE
    DEPLETION IN SOUTH-ASIA
  • OFF-FARM LABOR-MARKET ENTRY AND EXIT
  • MIGRATION TO THE UNITED-STATES AND MEXICAN
    RURAL-DEVELOPMENT - A CASE-STUDY
  • ECONOMIC-IMPACTS, VALUE ADDED, AND BENEFITS IN
    REGIONAL PROJECT ANALYSIS
  • RURAL-URBAN EFFECTS OF TERMINATING FARM SUBSIDIES
  • LOCAL ECONOMIC-CONDITIONS AND WAGE LABOR
    DECISIONS OF FARM AND RURAL NONFARM COUPLES
  • 9 of 500 most cited articles, 13-38 cits

13
Most Cited Papers in JRS
14
Enhancing Opportunities in Rural Areas
  • THE CONTRIBUTION OF PUBLICLY PROVIDED INPUTS TO
    STATES ECONOMIES
  • DO PRODUCER SERVICES INDUCE REGIONAL
    ECONOMIC-DEVELOPMENT
  • THE DETERMINANTS OF 1963-77 REGIONAL
    MANUFACTURING GROWTH - WHY THE SOUTH AND WEST
    GROW
  • A MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION MODEL OF SPATIAL
    AGGLOMERATION - DIFFERENTIATED PRODUCT APPROACH
  • WHAT ATTRACTS FOREIGN MULTINATIONAL-CORPORATIONS
    - EVIDENCE FROM BRANCH PLANT LOCATION IN THE
    UNITED-STATES
  • TAX COMPETITION WITH INTERREGIONAL DIFFERENCES IN
    FACTOR ENDOWMENTS
  • SERVICE EXPORTS AND REGIONAL GROWTH IN THE
    POSTINDUSTRIAL ERA
  • MIGRATION WITH A COMPOSITE AMENITY - THE ROLE OF
    RENTS
  • TECHNOLOGY AND REGIONAL-DEVELOPMENT - A SURVEY
  • 12 of 25 most cited articles, 40-144 cits

15
Implications/Assumptions
  • Regional Science community is a natural ally
  • Substantive, theoretical, and methodological
    links to issues of importance to Rural America
  • Common pedigree and training in Economics
  • Applied, data-intensive
  • Economics plus

16
Key Quests in Rural ResearchTheory
  • What do we want from rural development theory?
  • Theory that describes and helps us understand the
    world that is
  • Theory that helps us predict how the world will
    change
  • Theory that helps us learn how we can change the
    world
  • Theory that allows us to measure the outcomes of
    policies, programs, and plans

17
Theory We Need Follows from the Things We Do
  • We need theories that help us
  • Inform debates about federal rural development
    policy
  • Identify fruitful community development
    strategies and appropriate and effective state
    policies
  • Evaluate the outcomes for rural folks and
    businesses of private sector decisions, public
    programs, and technological changes
  • Understand the prospects of rural economic
    activities

18
Theory We Need Follows from the Things We Do
(cont.)
  • Predict the consequences of infrastructure
    investment, trade agreements, health care
    finance, welfare reform, and more
  • Understand the distributional consequences of
    rural growth or decline
  • Understand whether we are working with or against
    market forces and whether we are attempting to
    correct anti-rural biases in policies or striving
    to create rural biases
  • Identify when the rural condition is the result
    of market failure, market efficiency, or
    government intervention
  • Create empirical models that allow us to measure
    all these things

19
Key Quests in ResearchSubject
  • World viewlocation, place, and interaction in
    space matter
  • Location of people migration, housing,
    immigration
  • Location of economic activityeconomic
    development, agglomeration, advantage, clusters
  • Interaction in space transportation, land use,
    public finance, education, labor markets,
    poverty, communication and utilities, environment
  • gt Public policy on national, state, local, and
    international levels

20
Key Quests in ResearchMethods
  • Spatial analysis, modeling, and econometrics
  • Policy and project evaluation
  • Impact assessment
  • Forecasting
  • Optimization
  • Favorite methods Nobel LaureatesKlein,
    Leontief, Stone, McFadden

21
Sample Current Issues in Extension and Outreach
  • Economic and fiscal impacts of agriculture,
    airports, colleges of veterinary medicine,
    community colleges, Wal-Marts, locks and dams,
    Jones Act, environmental restoration, strip
    mining, casino gambling, land use change, urban
    agriculture, home gardening, sports stadiums
  • Feasibility and market potential for veterinary
    services, bio-energy, biotechnology, livestock,
    jails, military base conversions
  • Public policy for land use, transportation,
    public finance, schools, economic development

22
Obstacles and Opportunities in Education
  • Rural economics does not exist
  • Urban economics
  • Regional economics
  • Rural economics can and should exist
  • Issue-driven like early urban economics
  • Aggressively rurally obsessed in the
    interpretation, extension, and synthesis of
  • Regional economic development, location and land
    economics, resource economics, transportation
    economics
  • Education, health, housing, poverty

23
Allies Who CareResearch Funders
  • National Science Foundation, NIH, NCI, CDC
  • Economic Development Administration and
    Appalachian Regional Commission
  • Many, many federal agencies
  • World Bank, OECD, EU, and other international
    organizations
  • Foundations and other organizationspeople,
    places, rural, stewardship, quality of life,
    economic and social opportunity,
    educationBeyond Agriculture

24
AlliesExtension
  • The people in counties who feel
  • a lack of economic opportunity or
  • overwhelmed by opportunity and opportunists
  • The organizations and foundations who fund
    research
  • State legislators and local governments, business
    groups, and other organizations

25
AlliesEducation
  • The many teaching departments
  • who teach related courses for any minor or
    specialization related to rural economics
  • who provide part of the economics plus
  • Finance
  • Business management
  • Marketing
  • Policy analysis
  • Law

26
Regional/Rural Economics
  • A luxury you cannot afford?

27
Regional/Rural Economics
  • A luxury you cannot afford to be without?

28
Producers Care
  • RURAL economic development
  • RURAL land and water economics
  • RURAL education and health economics
  • RURAL transportation and communication economics
  • RURAL public finance
  • RURAL commercial and public facility location

29
Gardner/Illinois Farm Bureau Chair
  • We seek a colleague who has the intellectual
    curiosity, flexibility, and interest to study the
    wide range of local, state, national, and
    international policy issues when they are
    important to agriculture and rural economies, for
    example, public finance and local government,
    environment, income support and stability,
    biotechnology, trade, transportation, energy,
    education, and immigration.

30
Priorities to Action A
  • Provide input to hiring decisions in government
    agencies by signaling what areas are important
    for our profession
  • Listen to government agencies to learn what areas
    are important for our society

31
Priorities to Action B
  • Increase funding opportunities through national
    grants to support economics research and education
  • Take full advantage of the many funding
    opportunities available to support economics
    research and education
  • Make clear the important scholarly and societal
    issues that we can address and how

32
Priorities to Action C
  • Communicate to policy makers and stakeholders the
    importance of economics research, extension, and
    education
  • Listen and be responsive to policy makers and
    stakeholders when they tell us of the importance
    of new economics research, extension, and
    education

33
Priorities to Action D
  • Identify opportunities to collaborate with other
    disciplines and professional societies
  • We have natural allies and decades of
    constructive interaction with them

34
Enhancing Economic Opportunities in Rural
AreasPriorities Action
  • Woeful capacity constraint
  • Research numbers and knowledge
  • lt2 solution is not good enough
  • Teaching virtually non-existent
  • Extension big job, few people, incomplete teams
  • First action priority if we are serious
  • Build capacity
  • Develop theory
  • Embrace and lead allies
  • Exploit synergies agriculturalresourceregional
    and spatial

35
Are You Serious about Rural Area Opportunities?
  • Will you hire to match the goal?
  • Will you seek to achieve critical mass?
  • Would you embrace regional/rural economics if
    money were availableor is ag and resources
    already a bit much?
  • Will you add rural America to traditions of (1)
    farm and home and (2) international?
  • Will you take responsibility for rural folks or
    only folks as producers and food consumers?

36
Bad Things Happen When You Leave Rural Economics
to Others
  • Rural America defined nonsensically, the residual
  • Makes us look backwards and see economic
    opportunities in rural areas all wrong
  • Data are poor.
  • No data for economic opportunity in Rural
    America
  • Gives us over a million metropolitan farmers
  • Grand Canyon is not rural
  • Hides fact that much of rural America is fastest
    growing part of the nation and economically
    strong

37
Outside Core Based Statistical Areas
  • What proportion of the U.S. population lives in
    Rural America in 2000?
  • Answers
  • 55 million people, or 19
  • 59 million people, or 21
  • 39 million people, or 14
  • 7 million people, or 2
  • 89 million people, or 32

38
Andys Rural AmericaUrban America as the Residual
39
Poverty Rate, 2000Policy Categories, Calls for
Action
40
Government Farm Payments
41
How Much Effort to Enhancing Opportunity in this
Rural Region
  • Practice what we preach abroad?
  • Use the period of government support (or oil
    revenues, etc.)To build a sustainable economy
    that can compete in world markets
  • Is the C-FARE community interested in creating
    this outcome?
  • Is this truly a priority for action?
About PowerShow.com