The California Fire Alliance - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – The California Fire Alliance PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 241d68-NDRhN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

The California Fire Alliance

Description:

assist local communities in reducing wildfire risk ... Success in addressing the wildfire management issue demands a cooperative, ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:110
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: The California Fire Alliance


1
The CaliforniaFire Alliance
2
History
  • 2000s Cerro Grande escaped prescribed fire near
    Los Alamos in New Mexico, and multiple
    destructive wildfires throughout the West
    demonstrated to the public, elected officials,
    agency administrators and fire managers that
  • protection of natural and man-made resources
    requires joint effort by all agencies and fire
    programs
  • a well-rounded interagency approach to fire
    management is needed to meet the public's
    perception of adequate fire protection

3
History
  • The President called for an Action Plan by the
    U.S. Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior,
    to
  • address the current wildland fire situation
  • develop a strategy with recommendations to
    minimize the short and long term impacts from
    wildfires
  • The National Fire Plan outlined a comprehensive
    strategy with funding that began in Federal
    Fiscal Year 2001.

4
History
  • The California Fire Alliance (CFA) has been in
    existence for more than four years, but the
    National Fire Plan provided a resurgence and
    expansion of the CFA.
  • The Alliance consists of two levels of
    organization
  • The Leadership Group - Directors or Agency
    Administrators from participating agencies and
    groups
  • The Staff Team - Primary staff from participating
    agencies who develop recommendations for the
    Leadership Group

5
Our Mission
  • The California Fire Alliance is a cooperative
    membership organization that provides a model
    solution for National Fire Plan implementation,
    and is dedicated to ensuring that pre-fire
    management
  • provides for public and community safety
  • minimizes costs and losses from wildfire
  • maintains and improves the quality of the
    environment

6
Who We Are
  • The California Fire Alliance is an interagency
    forum in which local, tribal, state and federal
    agencies coordinate efforts to help
  • prepare for wildland firefighting
    (pre-suppression activities)
  • assist local communities in reducing wildfire
    risk
  • increase awareness of the need for local action

7
Who We Are
  • The Alliance currently consists of the following
    members
  • Bureau of Indian Affairs
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • Cal. Dept. of Forestry Fire Protection
  • Fire Safe Council
  • Governors Office of Emergency Services
  • L.A. County Fire Department
  • National Park Service
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • U.S.D.A. Forest Service

8
Goals and Strategies
  • The Alliance assists communities in development
    of fire loss mitigation projects that reduce the
    threat of wildfire losses on public private
    lands, by
  • facilitating community interaction with subject
    matter experts
  • promoting the use of member planning resources
    and tools as they are available
  • assisting communities in accessing appropriate
    project planning data and resources
  • providing on-site expertise and oversight during
    project implementation

9
Accomplishments Since 2001
  • Charter
  • Communities at Risk
  • Resource Guide
  • Grant Writing Workshops Statewide
  • Fire Alliance Web Site www.cafirealliance.org
  • One Stop Shopping Initiative
  • FireWise Workshops
  • Key Contact List
  • Wildfire Awareness Week
  • Print radio PSAs
  • News Release

10
Challenges
  • Californias wildfire management challenge has
    been 100 years in the making
  • Growth and development requires increased fire
    protection
  • Creating a catastrophic buildup of wildfire fuels
  • Increased risk of catastrophic wildfire and
    severe damage to communities and natural
    resources
  • Compounded by dramatic influx of people, homes
    and communities into the wildland-urban interface
    (WUI)

11
Challenges
  • Success in addressing the wildfire management
    issue demands a cooperative, integrated effort
    that moves beyond jurisdictional boundaries and
    embraces local communities at risk.

12
Challenges
  • Scope of problem exceeds the ability of any one
    agency, state, federal, or local, to address on a
    comprehensive basis, yet heavily relies on local
    actions by agencies and communities.

13
National Fire Plan
  • The National Fire Plan outlines a comprehensive
    strategy for funding in five areas
    Firefighting - To continue to fight the fires
    for the rest of this fire season and be
    adequately prepared for next year.
    Rehabilitation and Restoration - To restore
    landscapes and rebuild communities damaged by
    wildfires of 2000. Hazardous Fuel Reduction -
    To invest in projects to reduce fire risk.
    Community Assistance - To work directly with
    communities to ensure adequate protection.
    Accountability - To be accountable and
    establish adequate oversight, coordination,
    program development, and monitoring for
    performance.

14
National Fire Plan
  • The intent of the Community Assistance initiative
    is to provide communities interfacing with
    federal lands an opportunity to get technical
    assistance and funding to reduce the threat of
    wildfires.

15
National Fire Plan
  • The National Fire Plan directed federal agencies
    to "work directly with communities to ensure
    adequate protection from wildfires, and to
    develop a collaborative effort to attain the
    desired future condition of the land."
  • Key wildland fire management agencies in
    California have chosen to accomplish this effort
    through the California Fire Alliance.

16
NFP Accomplishments
  • Alliance member agencies have a proven track
    record of National Fire Plan accomplishments at
    the state and community level.

17
Community Assistance Grants Program
Fuel Reduction Accomplishes community fire safety
goals using all resources of community
Education Prepares community for change --
Influences attitude/actions
Capacity Creates community-based structure for
lasting change
18
State Fire Safe Council
  • FSC Web Site www.firesafecouncil.org
  • Premier Internet resource for community fire
    prevention education in California
  • Local FSCs share materials best practices
  • Map of Communities-at-Risk
  • Priority FSC-related legislative updates
  • Local FSC pages

19
(No Transcript)
20
State Fire Safe Council
  • FSC Web Site www.firesafecouncil.org
  • Results
  • Over 960,000 hits since October 2001

21
State Fire Safe Council
  • Wildfire Awareness Week 2002
  • Public education campaign to encourage defensible
    space clearance
  • Media relations, radio PSAs and community events
  • Community preparedness kits distributed at events
    door to door
  • FSC Homeowners Checklist
  • Wildfire Survival Checklist
  • Magnets depicting 30-100 of
  • defensible space

22
State Fire Safe Council
  • Results
  • 30.4 million audience impressions statewide
  • 45 local FSCs distributed kits in their
    communities
  • 4,000 kits with 15,000 fire safe handouts
  • Educational displays at 15 community events
    statewide

23
Supporting the California Fire Alliance
  • At the state, regional and federal levels,
    support funding initiatives that further pre-fire
    activities
  • At the local level, contact your community Fire
    Safe Council for wildfire prevention information

24
Looking Ahead
  • The California Fire Alliance will continue to
  • influence the direction of community protection
  • provide leadership in the protection of
    communities at risk
  • demonstrate to the agencies the importance of
    continued participation for a Fire Safe
    California
  • support the need for continued/sustained funding
    for Fire Safe Projects

25
(No Transcript)
26
  • NOTE TO ALLIANCE MEMBERS
  • Please use the following slides at your
    discretion, and please add new slides as
    appropriate

27
California Codes Benchmark Legislation
  • Defensible Space Standards
  • 30-100 Vegetation Clearance Around Structures
  • Tree Trimming
  • Roof Clearing
  • Chimney Screens
  • Fire Safe Landscaping Recommended

    (Public Resources Code Section 4291, Government
    Code Section 51182 LRA, Uniform Fire Code
    Appendix IIA, IFCI Urban Wildland Interface Code,
    Model Ord. for
    Defensibility of Space and Structures)

28
California Codes Benchmark Legislation
  • State Responsibility Area (SRA) Fire Safe
    Regulations
  • Statute Public Resources Code Section 4290
  • Regulations Title 14-CCR Sections 1270-1276.03
  • Road Standards for Fire Equipment Access
  • Standards for Signs Identifying Streets, Roads
    and Buildings
  • Minimum Private Water Supply Reserves for
    Emergency Fire Use
  • Fuel Breaks and Greenbelts
  • These regulations do not supersede local
    regulations which equal or exceed minimum state
    regulations

29
Mountain Rim Fire Safe Council
  • Living with Wildfire in the Inland Empire
  • Distribution channels
  • The San Bernardino Sun, Mountain News, Alpenhorn
    Crestline Courier
  • Local fairs, picnics and public events
  • Local schools (this fall)
  • Council meetings, Rotary and chamber meetings
    (this fall)
  • Final distribution to be completed in
    Spring/Summer of 2003
  • 132,000 homes within the project areas and beyond

30
FSCNC Senior Assistance Program
  • The FSCNC provides brush clearing for low income
    seniors
  • All projects are documented through before and
    after photos

31
Dorothy Mueller, 15472 Greenhorn Road, Grass
Valley, CA 95945 BEFORE
32
Dorothy Mueller, 15472 Greenhorn Road, Grass
Valley, CA 95945 AFTER
33
Concerned Resource Environmental Workers
(C.R.E.W.)
  • Program overview
  • Low-income youth
  • Community wild fire prevention
  • Collaborations with UFS, BLM, local government,
    CBOs and private foundations and area high
    schools
  • At risk communities
  • Meiners Oaks and Ojai
  • The Frazier Mountain

34
C.R.E.W.
  • Results
  • 12 miles (450 acres) of fuelbreak completed
  • Average 2 tons of biomass reutilization per
    Saturday
  • 14 tons distributed since April 2002
  • 10-26 youth employed per weekend
About PowerShow.com