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Information Fluent Students: Best Practices

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Title: Information Fluent Students: Best Practices


1
Information Fluent Students Best Practices
  • Shirley McDonald
  • January 26, 2008

2
Information Literacy/Fluency
  • Information literacy ability to recognize an
    information need and to locate, evaluate and
    effectively use the information.
  • Information fluency ability to combine
    information literacy and technology skills with
    critical thinking skills to solve an information
    need in legal and ethical ways presenting this
    information in the most effective manner.

3
Real-life example
  • Choosing the best checking account option
  • Gather info about banks options
  • Evaluate which options are best for you
  • Use the information to find the best deal
  • More than accessing information on the Web
    creating a Wiki or Blog or Webpage
  • Vital to success in a competitive job market
  • UCF Information Fluency Initiative Information
    Fluency Questions and Answers
  • http//if.ucf.edu/ifaq.php

4
Associated Colleges of the South Model for
Information Fluency
  • Xavier University - http//www.xavier.edu/library/
    education/information_fluency.cfm

5
Annette Lambs Model of Information Fluency
6
My Model
  • See Handout

7
Purpose of study
  • To explore the interactions between school
    library media specialists and teachers as they
    used technology in a secondary school setting in
    an effort to discover the best practices for
    producing information fluent students.
  • McDonald, Shirley B. (2006). The role of
    technology in the interactions between secondary
    school library media specialists and teachers.
    (Doctoral dissertation, Louisiana State
    University, 2006). Dissertation Abstracts
    International.

8
Research Questions
  • What are the interactions of school library media
    specialists and teachers associated with the use
    of information technology?
  • What is the contextual climate of the
    interactions?
  • What are the ways that technology is being used
    to teach information fluency to students?

9
Methodology
  • Part 1 - a survey of school library media
    specialists who were members of Louisiana
    Association for School Librarians and working in
    a secondary school setting
  • Part 2 - case study of three exemplary Louisiana
    school library media centers, including a survey
    of core content area teachers.
  • Magnet school
  • Private, parochial school
  • Public school with high level of economically
    disadvantaged students

10
Summary no surprises!
  •         School library media specialists
    consider themselves as educators first
  •         School library media specialists are
    leaders and visionaries who model lifelong
    learning
  •         School library media specialists are
    committed to acquiring, utilizing, and promoting
    new technologies,
  •         School library media specialists
    consider technology as one of the tools to teach
    information fluency, although an increasingly
    important one.

11
Making a Difference
  • There was a shared belief among them that they
    could make a difference in their schools by
    actively contributing to the process of teaching
    and learning.
  • Producing information fluent students requires
    collaboration between teachers, administrators,
    and school library media specialists - and this
    requires work on the part of the SLMS.

12
Findings - SLMS
  • The school library media centers were busy.
  • More often, collaboration was informal rather
    than planned departmental or curriculum meetings,
    and much of it centered on technology.

13
Technology as a Tool
  • School library media specialists were committed
    to using technology as one tool to improve the
    critical thinking and information literacy skills
    of their students.
  • SLMS were committed to acquiring, utilizing, and
    promoting the use of new technologies, involved
    in grant writing opportunities and wish lists
    to donors.
  • All were willing to provide training to their
    teachers not only on technology skills, but also
    on integration of technology into their lessons
    so that students would learn to locate, utilize,
    evaluate, and present information.

14
Continuing Ed
  • SLMS attended workshops, retreats, and
    presentations at conferences to learn of
    technological advances and methods of integrating
    technology into the classroom.
  • This finding supports that of a technology survey
    (Brewer Milam, 2005) by School Library Journal,
    which reports that 84 of library media
    specialists train teachers in technology-related
    skills

15
Working with Students
  • The SLMS
  • provided continuous individual and whole group
    assistance
  • - required students to evaluate their
    information sources for validity, reliability,
    and accuracy, especially those sources found on
    the Internet.
  • required students to first search for sources
    from the print collection, then from the
    reference databases, and finally from the
    Internet (reinforcing the necessity of evaluation
    of content).

16
Uses of Technology for Information Fluency
  • Use of electronic reference databases
  • Internet research, effective searching skills,
    WebQuests, scavenger hunts, pathfinders
  • Word Processing, desktop publishing, Powerpoint
  • Reading Management Programs
  • Citation of sources
  • OPAC
  • Instructional programs SkillsTutor, etc.
  • Teacher webpages
  • Emailing

17
Teachers Perspective
  • English classes scheduled class visits more often
    than other subject areas. (Information fluency
    should be interdisciplinary!)
  • Majority felt that technology had a positive
    impact on the interactions between school library
    media specialists and teachers and on student
    information fluency skills.

18
Teachers Perspective
  • SLMS expertise make them the final word in what
    technology we can use to teach our students more
    effectively.
  • Helpful technological sources/resources provided
    by the school library media specialists increased
    the number of collaborations.
  • Technology is already the primary tool needed to
    access information.

19
Teachers Perspective
  • Computer literacy skills are necessary for
    students to be successful in school, in college,
    and in life after school.
  • Teachers most often had their students use the
    library technology to conduct research, followed
    by use of productivity tools such as Word,
    PowerPoint, and Excel.
  • Other purposes mentioned were scientific or math
    software, tutorials, and personal use.

20
Wireless Labs and Information Fluency
  • I probably have less physical contact with the
    librarians because we use the wireless laptops in
    class.
  • We do not have a need to go to the library as
    often.
  • I need both the technical expertise and the
    information literacy skills of the librarian.
  • SLMS were apprehensive that teachers were not
    trained enough in teaching information skills
    (we are the experts).

21
Technology and Information Research
  • A common thread throughout all the comments was
    that technology skills were incorporated into
    almost all research assignments, or as one
    respondent said, everyday, hands-on.
  • Every project involves information literacy
    skills.

22
Collaboration and Technology
  • When asked to rank the importance of
    librarian/teacher collaboration in the use of
    technology to teach information fluency skills,
    SLMS in my survey overwhelmingly rated
    collaboration as very important (32) or
    extremely important (54).

23
SLMS and Collaborations
  • When teachers collaborate with us, the students
    do better with assignments.
  • Teachers welcome my help, but there is not much
    time to do so.
  • I have had much more success in volunteering to
    assist in the projects they already have
    planned.

24
Collaboration Pitfalls
  • Too many teachers feel that Google searches can
    provide all the research information students
    need.
  • Teachers do not feel the need to plan when they
    can just bring their students to the library to
    do research.
  • Not enough time for teachers or for SLMS
  • Technology phobia

25
Increasing Collaboration to Teach Information
Fluency
  • Public relations (getting message to faculty)
  • Staff development
  • Allotted time for planning
  • Administrative support
  • Mandatory projects for all content areas
  • Professional development of SLMS
  • Leadership of school library media specialists.

26
Increasing Collaboration…
  • Continue banging on their doors…Telling them
    about new information and volunteering to help.
  • Constantly making teachers aware of how we can
    help them (and sneaking in the idea of using
    technology to the reluctant) is probably the most
    important thing we do.

27
Increasing Collaboration…
  • Mini-workshops at faculty meetings
  • Library orientation for faculty (especially for
    new teachers).
  • Librarians have to cultivate their relationships
    with administrators and encourage and educate
    them so that they will require this integration.

28
  • SLJs 2006 Tech Survey
  • 1,696 media specialists from 49 states
  • 65 percent boast a library Web page.
  • 77 percent of respondents, every school computer
    is connected to the Internet via DSL or cable,
    while 54 percent boast wireless connectivity.

29
SLJ Technology Activities
  • School Library Journals Technology Survey
    (Brewer Milam, 2005) reports that most of the
    technology activities of school library media
    specialists directly impact student achievement
    (p. 5) by
  • training students to use technology resources to
    locate information,
  • providing technology training to both students
    and teachers,
  • collaborating with teachers to integrate
    information literacy and National Educational
    Technology Standards.

30
SLJ Technology Activities
  • School Library Journals Technology Survey
    (Brewer Milam, 2005) reports that most of the
    technology activities of school library media
    specialists directly impact student achievement
    (p. 5) by
  • training students to use technology resources to
    locate information,
  • providing technology training to both students
    and teachers,
  • collaborating with teachers to integrate
    information literacy and National Educational
    Technology Standards.

31
SLJ Top Activity
  • What's No. 1? Training students to locate
    information using electronic resources, according
    to more than 90 percent of our respondents
  • 85 percent say that they also train teachers in
    this regard, and in turn, teachers spread this
    knowledge among their classes.

32
Steps of the Research Process
Table 20. Technology in the Steps of the Research
Process, Louisiana Model (in percentages)
33
Recommendations
  • Principal support of a school library media
    program is crucial (Hartzell, 2003 Lindsay,
    2004).
  • School library media specialists must self
    promote their programs.
  • Collaboration with teachers requires time, so
    school library media specialists and teachers
    should be given time to plan collaboratively.

34
Recommendations
  • SLMS should actively promote the integration of
    technology into the information fluency
    curriculum.
  • Continuing education is a necessity in a
    profession that utilizes such rapidly changing
    resources.

35
Information Lit Models
  • Research Models
  • http//www.indianalearns.org/infolitinvestRM.asp
  • Louisiana Model
  • http//www.doe.state.la.us/lde/uploads/4211.pdf
  • Big 6
  • http//www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id89
  • Comparison of Information Literacy Research
    Models
  • http//www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id87

36
Info Lit in All Disciplines
  • Wikis and Collaborative Writing Article
  • http//eduscapes.com/hightech/spaces/collaborative
    /wikiTL.pdf
  • Technology as a Tool
  • http//www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id144
  • Big 6 Chart
  • http//www.big6.com/showarticle.php?id40

37
Information Fluency Best Practices
  • Information Age Inquiry
  • http//virtualinquiry.com/specialist/existing.htm
  • Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy
  • http//wizard.imsa.edu/

38
Lesson Plans
  • WebQuest on Evaluation of Websites
  • http//www.culver.org/students/academics/library/w
    ebquests/intro.html
  • Big 6
  • http//www.big6.com/showcategory.php?cid19
  • Library Instruction.com
  • http//www.libraryinstruction.com/lessons.html
  • Discovery Education
  • http//school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/

39
Information Fluency Websites
  • Noodletools
  • www.noodletools.com
  • PC Magazines 100 Best Websites
  • http//www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2704,2168282,00.as
    p
  • 21st Century Information Fluency
  • http//21cif.imsa.edu/rkit/newRkit/evaluation.html
  • Alan Novembers Infolit Resources
  • http//www.anovember.com/Default.aspx?tabid160

40
Ultimate in Information Literacy
  • For some students, and in certain schools, this
    may be many students, the only library skill that
    they should have to acquire is an awareness
    imprinted indelibly and happily upon them, that
    the library is a friendly place where the
    librarians are eager to help.
  • Frances Henne

41
Share Your Best Practices
  • (See handout for best practices from the
    dissertation study and from Blanche Woolls
    presentation at AASL for ideas from others.)

42
Lets Continue the List
  • Send me your best practices for creating
    information fluent students. I will compile them
    and send the compilation to you.
  • Contact info
  • shirley.mcdonald_at_lpsb.org
  • shirleymcdonald_at_bellsouth.net
  • Work 225-667-3481
  • Home 225-664-7428

43
Works Cited
  • Ascione, Laura. (2006) Study Ed tech has proven
    effective. eSchool News Online. Retrieved on
  • October 3, 2006 from http//www.eschoolnews
    .com/news/showStory.cfm?ArticleID6600.
  • Associated Colleges of the South (2000). ACS
    information fluency project. Associated Colleges
    of
  • the South. Retrieved on August 21, 2005,
    from
  • http//www.colleges.org/techcenter/if/repor
    ts/if_yr1_report.pdf.
  • Lamb, A. (2004b). The learning keystone. Paper
    presented at the meeting of the National
    Educational Computing Conference. New Orleans,
    LA.
  • Loertscher, D. Achterman, D. (2003). Increasing
    academic achievement through the
  • library media center A guide for teachers.
    2nd edition. Salt Lake City, UT Hi
  • Willow Research and Publishing.
  • Louisiana State Department of Education. (2004).
    Guidelines for library media programs in
  • Louisiana schools. Baton Rouge, LA
    Louisiana State Department of Education.
  • Poggione, M. (2005). Education services
    Information fluency programs. Xavier University
    Library.
  • Retrieved on August 16, 2005, from
  • http//www.xavier.edu/library/education/inf
    ormation_fluency.cfm.
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