Bringing About Meaningful Change - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Bringing About Meaningful Change PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 1d66c8-YTgzN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Bringing About Meaningful Change

Description:

Bringing About Meaningful Change – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:83
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 93
Provided by: michaeld153
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Bringing About Meaningful Change


1
Bringing About Meaningful Change
Professor Stuart B. Hill University of Western
Sydney s.hill_at_uws.edu.au
2
Bringing About Meaningful Change Ground Rules
  • very first (uncensored) thoughts
  • focus on 2 or 3 things (versus a long list)
  • in pairs take turns to think listen equal
    (adequate)
  • time if in threes, then third person can
    keep notes
  • express in words (/or drawings, sounds)
  • note all associated thoughts, feelings, images,
  • memories

3
Bringing About Meaningful Change
  • What issue do you most want to focus on at this
    moment?

4
Upper levels affect lower levels
Our species with its rich cultural diversity
Planet Earth
Industrialised Western world population
Zoogeograhical region (Australiasia)
Country state population
Country, state bioregion
Community, interest, work, church professional
groups
Catchment, town, suburb, village
Family, friends, and workmates
Work play places
Self
Home
Lower levels affect upper levels
5
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • What do you most love about.?
  • (whatever it is)

6
Levels of consideration for better action
action
planning
imagination creativity
feelings passions
worldviews, values beliefs
Top two overemphasised
(modified from John Herron, 1992. Feeling and
Personhood. Sage, London)
7
Our cultural evolution
Higher values driven
Enablement
Network society driven
Demand driven
Socialisation
Sustainability Equity/Social justice
Supply driven
8
Psychosocial evolution transformative institutio
nal structural change
  • Socialising
  • Exclusionary
  • Social
  • Institutions
  • Problem Focus
  • Enabling
  • Participatory
  • Social
  • Institutions
  • Redesign/Design

9
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • Boldly lie about how you have made your whole
    system completely.
  • (eg, sustainable, healthy)
  • /or how you solved

10
One radical way to progress our thinking
action is paradoxically (in a workshop context)
to boldly 'lie' about changes that you have
already brought about (that you have actually not
brought about!)
This enables us to vision in relation to our
benign potential, rather than settle for
tinkering with the status quo
By daring to engage in such 'deep' reflection
implementation of meaningful doable initiatives,
we can significantly contribute to changing the
world for the better
11
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • What have you already done, or are currently
    doing, to.?
  • (eg, care for makesustainable, healthy)
  • related to, or compatible with, your bold
    lie(s)

12
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • Whats one thing you have wondered about
    doing/would really like to do next to address the
    issue?

13
Appropriate next steps are
  • deeply personal
  • highly context specific

This is why
  • formulaic,
  • centrally-directed
  • imposed change
  • always fails to achieve its stated aims
  • invariably causes more problems than it solves

14
Consequently the collaborative task is to
design implement institutional
community structures processes
that can enable those of us involved
to take those appropriate next steps,
to evaluate, celebrate learn our way forwards
as we go
15
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • What would you need to have access to in order to
    be able to do this? (particular information,
    skills, resources, supports)

16
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • How might/could you get these things that you
    would need?

17
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • What might stop you (barriers) external
  • (eg, judgements by others) internal
  • (eg, fears, feeling incapable, lack of
    confidence, postponement pattern)

18
Limiting factors for change
  • information access to it, misinformation,
  • knowledge, skills, competencies
  • resources renewable, non-renewable,
    technologies, money, time
  • institutional supports policies, programs,
    structures, services, legislation, regulations

19
Limiting factors for change (cont.)
  • family community support
  • empowerment/disempowerment
  • (feelings of helplessness/hopelessness)
  • awareness
  • vision imagination
  • values, worldviews, paradigms, beliefs
  • persistent denial, procrastination
    distractive/compensatory activities

20
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • How might/could you get around/overcome these
    external internal barriers? (eg, reducing the
    size of the initiative to make it doable)

21
Kurt Lewins Force Field Analysis
add strengthen
Driving forces
Restraining forces (barriers)
external internal
remove weaken
22
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  •  What small meaningful, doable initiative are
  • you willing to absolutely commit to?
  • Over what time frame?

23
Framework for planning change
Strategic questions What would it take
to.? What gets in the way what would
remove these barriers?
24
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • Who will you ask to be an ally to you, or to
  • collaborate with you, in this project
    what
  • specifically will you ask them to do to
    support
  • you?

25
Bringing About Meaningful Change (cont.)
  • How will you celebrate your progress
  • outcomes? so that others may learn from
  • your initiative experience? (to make such
  • progressive change become contagious)

26
(No Transcript)
27
Testing questions for evaluating initiatives
28
Does it support?
Personal (capital sustainability)
  • spontaneity, curiosity engagement
  • empowerment, awareness, respect of the unknown
  • creative visioning, values worldviews
    clarification
  • acquisition of essential literacies
    competencies
  • building maintaining vitality, health
    wellbeing
  • caring, loving, responsible, negentropic
    relationships
  • lifelong personal development responsibility

29
Does it support? (cont.)
Socio-political / cultural (capital
sustainability)
  • building maintaining trust, access,
    collaborative,
  • life-affirming community structures processes
  • reflexive, critical, imaginative, celebrational
    attitudes
  • cultural diversity respectful, mutualistic
  • relationships
  • cultural development psychosocial co-evolution

30
Does it support? (cont.)
Environmental/natural (capital sustainability)
  • enabling life-supporting ecological processes
  • conserving habitats functional high
    biodiversity
  • ecosystem development co-evolutionary change

31
Does it support? (cont.)
General foci
  • proactive, whole system design/redesign
  • for wellbeing
  • small/doable, meaningful, collaborative
    initiatives
  • windows of change use of integrator-indicators
  • attentive to all outcomes feedback

32
Decisions to make re change
  • what to stop doing
  • what to reduce/de-emphasise
  • what to do differently
  • what to increase/expand
  • what to start doing (new)

33
Decisions to make re change (cont.)
  • what will it take to do this?
  • what are the barriers
  • what will remove them?
  • what resources are needed
  • available (particularly locally) how to get
    them?

34
Some Pre-prerequisites for Sustainability
  • awareness consciousness
  • dreams, hopes, visions imagination
  • values clarification, commitment courage
  • understanding collaboration across difference
  • new kinds of community, political, business
    academic leadership ( support)

35
Decisions to make re-change (cont.)
  • prioritise activities aportion resources
  • brainstorm, set long-, mid- short-term goals
  • breakdown into meaningful doable actions
  • do, reflect celebrate, do reflect celebrate
  • evaluate redesign programs activities
  • (as indicated)

36
(No Transcript)
37
(No Transcript)
38
(No Transcript)
39
(No Transcript)
40
(No Transcript)
41
(No Transcript)
42
F
  • lat outstretched upon a mound of
    earth I lie I Press my ear against its surface
    and I hear far off and deep, the measured sound
    of heart that beats within the ground. And with
    it pounds in harmony with the swift, familiar
    heart in me. They pulse as one, together swell,
    together fall I cannot tell my sound from
    Earths, for I am part of rhythmic, universal
    heart.
  • - Elizabeth Odell

43
(No Transcript)
44
(No Transcript)
45
(No Transcript)
46
We need to recognise the degree to which
psychological processes influence everything (as
barriers enablers)
47
outside inside out !
48
Why do so many of us keep making the same
mistakes?
49
Assumption
At every moment we are all always doing the best
we can, given
  • what we inherited (genetics plus)
  • our past experiences, adaptations to them
  • present contexts conditions

50
Person
Values Morals Ethics
Actions
Past Environments/Experiences
Present Environment/Conditions
Supportive
Oppressive
51
Establishment of maladaptive compensatory selves
Hurt Oppression
Adaptation (maladaptation)
Core healthy self/essence
Hurt Oppression
Multiple Selves
  • Core
  • Healthy
  • spontaneous
  • aware
  • empowered
  • loving
  • informed action
  • Maladaptive Compensatory
  • patterned
  • unaware
  • disempowered
  • fearful
  • acting out

Distorted potentially healthy behaviour
Superimposed unhealthy behaviour
52
(No Transcript)
53
The way I look at it, for what I lose in freedom
I gain in security
54
Most of the time we behave as if we were
hypnotised twice
firstly into accepting pseudoreality as reality,
secondly into believing we were not hypnotised
R. D. Laing 1971 The Politics of the Family
55
(No Transcript)
56
(No Transcript)
57
(No Transcript)
58
REDUCE REUSE RECYCLE
REPAIR REFRAIN REFUSE RESCUE REGENERATE REDESIG
N REFLECT REVIEW RE-EVALUATE READ RISK REGIS
TER RULES RESPONSIBILITY RECOVER REVOLT
REBEL RECONSIDER REFUTE REBUKE REGULATE
Etc, etc, AND all other letters alphabets
59
  • For ecological and cultural
  • sustainability both the soil
  • and people will need more
  • fibre!
  • Stuart Hill 1998

60
The current state of the world, with its
environmental degradation, conflicts,
inequities, prejudices, other negative
characteristics, is the collective result of all
of these maladaptive compensatory expressions
of our thinking acting
So the challenge in relation to any area is to
reflect on the ways in which our thinking
acting express our benign potential, ( also
how they might be maladaptive compensatory)
then enable the former to be expressed the
latter to be healed addressed
61
We must also recognise that we are evolving
psychosocially
plan for better futures rather than more
efficient controlled pasts
62
Psychosocial evolution of child development (de
Mause 1982 Foundations of Psychohistory, Creative
Roots, New York)
Enabling
Enabling recognises all humans as social,
potentially benign beings, capable of developing
their own agendas it is supportive of this
All other stages impose adult agendas on
children others, so undermine their
potential development
63
'Socialising', like all previous stages in our
psychosocial evolution, involves the excessive
imposition by adults, society in general, of
foreign agendas (invariably inappropriate in
content with respect to time space) on
children who (if not wounded) have their own
benign, uniquely personal contextually
fine-tuned agendas
This oppressive process results in young peoples
disempowerment, loss of awareness, the
development of adaptive non-benign thoughts
behaviours, a sense of disconnectedness, both
from their external internal worlds most
choose either to conform or rebel
64
In contrast to this, 'enabling' approaches to
child-rearing education have the potential to
support the development of individuals who are
empowered, aware, loving, caring, responsible,
creative, visionary, knowledgeable, competent,
wise, with a zest for life
Such individuals are likely to be much more
capable of acting alone, in collaboration with
others, to radically transform redesign our
institutional structures process, our
lifestyles, to make the world a better place for
all
65
In whatever ways that we have been raised, we all
retain a capacity for benign action , in our
own ways, are always endeavouring to do our best
to act on this capacity
But, too often, for most of us, because our
efforts to do this have repeatedly been
thwarted, because the dominant cultural
pressures make this difficult, we commonly settle
for going along with things postponing such
action, for substituting 'adaptive'
'compensatory' behaviours
These involve compromising our values, seeking
stimulation to feel 'alive', consumptive
lifestyles, obsession with appearance
impressing others, loss of purpose direction,
fears denial concerning all of this
66
(No Transcript)
67
10 Common Mistakes to Avoid Needs to
Meet, When Seeking to Create a Better World
Professor Stuart B. Hill University of Western
Sydney s.hill_at_uws.edu.au
68
Getting the usual experts (mostly older males)
together to talk plan
  • always leads to tinkering with existing (flawed)
    plans being trapped in dominant paradigms
  • excludes most, including those affected by
  • such plans their fresh ideas

69
Need
  • involve mostly different people
  • start by focusing not on plans, but on values,
  • beliefs, worldviews paradigms

then feelings passions
then, emergent from these, hopes, dreams,
visions, imaginings, creative thoughts
70
Need (cont.)
only then can design/redesign-based plans
be enabled to emerge (these proactively enable
systems structures processes to meet
long-term to short-term, broad to specific,
goals make systems as problem-proof as
possible)
then critically analyse, integrate, flesh
these out, etc
detail participatory opportunities,
responsibilities, time lines, resource support
needs, means for monitoring outcomes,
tracking progress, for ongoing redesigning
fine tuning
71
Emphasising problem-solving approaches (back-end,
reactive/responsive, curative)
  • these tend to focus on symptom management
  • neglect the need to address the underlying
    maldesign
  • mismanagement roots of all problems
  • they typically over-focus on measuring problems
  • (a main strategy used for postponing action -
    by those
  • who benefit from the status quo)
  • over-focus on efficiency substitution
    strategies,
  • eg, improved application of pesticides, on
    finding
  • less disruptive (but still purchased)
    substitutes, such as
  • biological controls genetically modified
    organisms

same story in other areas medicine, energy, etc

72
Need
  • redesign existing systems ( design new
  • systems) to make them as problem-proof
  • as possible
  • to enable effective change from flawed
  • /defective systems to significantly more
  • improved ones

73
Getting stuck in activities pathologically
designed to postpone (feared) change
  • particularly measuring problems
  • (monitoring our extinction)
  • endless over-collection of data (often
    justified by
  • a need for evidence-based vs. responsible
    approaches)
  • hearings, committee meetings, report-writing,
    etc
  • most have NO follow-through, usually only lead
  • to more of the same

74
Need
  • postponing pathologies must be recognised,
  • exposed, contradicted addressed by taking
  • responsible, timely, appropriate,
    collaborative action
  • access to relevant data is needed to make
  • responsible decisions however, adequate data
  • are often already available from other places,
    in
  • other languages etc
  • globally, billions of dollars are wasted
    annually
  • unnecessarily repeating studies in new
    locations
  • or with mischievous intentions (often related
    to
  • perceived threats to existing commercial
    advantage)

75
Trying to solve problems within the discipline or
area responsible for creating them
  • or with multidisciplinary teams of selected
  • experts/authorities from favoured disciplines,
  • with others excluded

76
Need
  • genuine transdisciplinary, multi-competency
  • multi-experience teams, able to access
  • disciplinary specialised knowledge as needed
  • include competencies relating to holistic
  • approaches to design, sustainability,
    wellbeing,
  • meaning effective change processes

77
Patriarchal (them doing things to/for us, us
doing things to/for them) driven do-good
approaches are rarely exactly what is needed
  • these are generally not sustained
  • or embraced by those being helped
  • also, they invariably have diverse negative
  • unexpected consequences

78
Need
  • inclusion of those most affected by proposed
  • improvements as primary collaborators in
  • change processes from beginning to end
  • enables ownership, relevance, achievability,
  • ongoing improvement openness to
  • unforseen/surprise benefits

79
Planning Olympic/mega-scale, heroic initiatives
(from hearings to projects), with no
follow-through or provision for ongoing support
(more than just funding)
  • these invariably only reach the analysis,
  • planning preliminary stages (then are
    abandoned)
  • most have unforseen, numerous, long-term
  • widespread harmful side-effects

80
Need
  • diverse, mutually supportive, doable initiatives
  • that have long-term support
  • consideration of opportunities for ongoing
  • improvement learning our ways forward
  • collaboratively towards improved futures

81
Over focus on knowledge data, neglect of
wisdom experience
  • most wisdom cannot be supported by data
  • it involves working with the unknown most
    of
  • what is not just the limited known often
    in
  • ways that rely on intuition gut feelings etc

82
Need
  • to be much better at recognising, valuing
  • involving the wisest most experienced in our
  • society not be so obsessed with
    cleverness
  • (whereas wisdom enables us to work with the
  • unknown know, cleverness is limited to
    working
  • with the miniscule known)

83
Over focus on productivity, profit, quick
dramatic results
  • predictably leads to burn-out, only short-term,
  • limited benefits, often unexpected
    disbenefits
  • (additional problems that are often initially
    unrecognised)

84
Need
  • much more focus on maintenance activities
  • caring for one another
  • ( other species the environment)
  • celebration
  • venting feelings, access to healing support,
    etc
  • prioritise time resources for these activities
  • sustained productivity is emergent from the
  • effective maintenance of whole systems

85
Homogenisation tendencies
  • these tend to result in construction of favoured
  • norms (for people, structures, processes, etc)
  • failure to consider diversity
  • creation of in-groups out-groups
  • also, inclusion, exclusion blaming
  • failure to benefit from the creativity that
    resides
  • at the margins in the borderlands of society

86
Need
  • openness to appreciation of the value
  • of hererogeneity functional diversity
  • within all systems
  • with its opportunities for synergy, mutualism
  • lateral paradoxical thinking acting
  • extension beyond the usual competencies
  • relevance to core needs possibilities
  • sense of inclusion, ownership, sense of place,
    etc

87
Neglect of the arts, or only token involvement
  • over-focus on the sciences, technologies,
  • business, politics, the professions, the
    media,
  • the other major institutions in our society
  • as a result, the arts are poorly supported,
  • regarded as a luxury or optional extra,
  • an afterthought, or even irrelevant

88
Need
  • recognition of the arts, in its broadest sense,
  • as being an essential part of both the
    foundation
  • means for implementation of all efforts to
  • achieve genuine sustainable improvement

89
Plus many other mistakes needs What are
the ones that come to mind for you?
90
(No Transcript)
91
(No Transcript)
92
Levels of Ecological-Self Consciousness
1. manipulated eco-self behaviourism
2. learned eco-self cognitive
3. participative eco-self deconstructionist
postmodern
4. deep eco-self depth
5. holistic eco-self holistic psychosomatic
6. person-planet ( body-mind) unity
transpersonal
About PowerShow.com