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The NC Graduation Project Implementation Training

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Title: The NC Graduation Project Implementation Training


1
The NC Graduation Project Implementation Training
  • 2008 Summer Teacher Conference
  • Day 2
  • Presenter Tisha Greene

2
Day 2 Overview
  • Academic Advising
  • Product Implementation
  • Viewing Student Presentations
  • Training Review Boards
  • Training Community-based Mentors

3
Part I Academic Advising
4
Academic Advising What is it?
  • Advising provides the student with guidance
    through the NC Graduation Project process.
  • The academic advisor may be any teacher from any
    content area who serves as the main contact at
    the school to help a student develop and complete
    his/her graduation project.

5
The Role of the Academic Advisor
  • The role of the academic advisor may include but
    is not limited to assisting students with the
    following
  • Selection and narrowing of a topic
  • Process of research
  • Documentation of research
  • Revision and editing of the topic
  • Approval of the topic
  • Approval of the product
  • Completion of all applicable progress checks,
    documentation logs of service hours, notification
    of parents, and selection of mentors
  • Monitoring of the student log of activities

6
Supporting the NC Graduation Project through
Academic Advising
  • Small schools, schools with academies, magnet
    schools or schools with unique themes can build
    the Graduation Project around the schools theme
  • A. Academy of Engineering
  • B. Global Studies
  • II. Schools with strong academic foci can
    structure the academic advising component around
    an advising period that follows students from
    grades 9 12.

7
Supporting the NC Graduation Project through
Academic Advising
  • Grade 9 Portfolio documentation
  • Journal
  • Résumé
  • Business letter
  • Grade 10 Product/Experience
  • Selection of a mentor
  • Creating a product/documenting hours
  • Choosing a research topic

8
Supporting the NC Graduation Project through
Academic Advising
  • Grade 11 Research and Presentation Skills
  • Outlining your research
  • Using multimedia in presentation
  • Avoiding plagiarism
  • The difference between a speech and a
    presentation
  • Grade 12 Interview and Job Ready Skills
  • Nailing the interview (what to wear, answering
    questions, job preparedness)
  • Revisiting the résumé and adding the cover letter

9
Questions
?
10
Part II - The Product
11
Product Implementation
  • Purpose
  • The product component requires the student to
    create a product related to the research. The
    product must be selected, designed and developed
    by the student. The process of production will
    reflect applications of critical thinking skills,
    problem-solving skills, teamwork, personal
    employability skills (such as responsibility,
    persistence and independence).

12
Product Development
  • In this component, students use the information
    gathered in their research and in field work to
    create a product that fulfills a need or desire.
    The conception, development and refinement of the
    product created must respond to the identified
    need or desire. The quality of the product should
    reflect a minimum of fifteen (15) hours of work
    or service.

13
Product Development continued
  • This phase of the NC Graduation Project offers
    students an opportunity to connect their
    educational aspirations with real world career,
    personal growth, internship, apprenticeship or
    community service opportunities.
  • Students should be creative and innovative in
    devising their products. The product may be
    tangible and intangible, short-term or long-term,
    personal or public.
  • The key to an effective product is to allow for
    individual differences and creativity.

14
Product Guidelines
  • 1. The product must be student-generated.
    Students must develop and design the product. For
    example, students cannot purchase and assemble a
    model kit as a product. However, if a student
    designs a model, builds it from raw materials and
    uses it to show application/synthesis of
    knowledge acquired from research, that would be
    acceptable.

15
Product Guidelines continued
  • The product proposal must be approved by the
    academic advisor and project coordinator.
  • The product is tangible evidence of the effort
    and time invested in the endeavor to meet the
    criteria established for the product. The student
    should be able to show that the product is an
    extension, application and synthesis of the
    research and has practical applications in the
    real world.

16
Product Guidelines continued
  • 4. The product is tangible evidence that reflects
    applications of learning, critical thinking
    skills, problem-solving skills, teamwork and
    personal employability skills (such as
    responsibility, persistence and independence).
  • 5. The conception, development and refinement of
    the product created must match the identified
    need or desire. This phase of the graduation
    project offers students an opportunity to connect
    educational aspirations with real-world career or
    community-service opportunities.

17
Product Guidelines continued
  • The quality of the product created should reflect
    a minimum of (15) hours of work or experience in
    a setting related to the research topic.
  • The product must be adequately documented with
    photographs, logs, letters, reflective journal
    entries and other forms of documentation.

18
Product Guidelines continued
  • Students should avoid choosing products that
    might require excessive expenses, as the state
    does not provide funding for student graduation
    projects.
  • Successful completion of a graduation project is
    not dependent upon the amount of money invested
    in the graduation project.

19
Product Example
  • Thesis The benefits of a walking program that
    maintains a target heart rate for twenty minutes
    are increased energy, a reduction in coronary
    diseases and the maintenance of a healthy weight.
  • Product The student designs, implements and
    documents a walking program for a targeted group
    (patients at a nursing home aged 65 70).
  • Experience The student works with residents to
    implement the program at the nursing home.

20
Exercise Time!
21
Exercise Directions
  • Using the following essay topics from yesterday,
    think of a possible product/experience for each
  • Banning Secondhand Smoke
  • Organic Foods
  • Video Games and Teenage Aggression
  • Illegal Downloading of Music
  • (Work in groups)

22
Questions
?
23
Part III - The Presentation
24
The Oral Presentation
  • Purpose
  • The purpose of the oral presentation is to allow
    the student the opportunity to highlight the work
    and learning in the area of special interest. The
    presentation is the culmination of the graduation
    project.
  • The process of preparing for and presenting the
    project publicly further helps students develop
    and exhibit communication skills and abilities
    required in the 21st Century and the NC Standard
    Course of Study.

25
Presentation Preparation
  • Preparation for the presentation should include
    the following
  • Students should write a letter of introduction
    and explanation of their project to include in
    the portfolio. The panel members should read this
    letter before listening to the presentation.
  • Panel members should be given the opportunity to
    preview the students portfolio prior to the oral
    presentation.

26
Presentation Preparation continued
  • Panelists should be prepared to ask questions at
    the end of the presentation.
  • Students should send thank you notes to all panel
    members following the students oral
    presentation.
  • Panelists should use the state-endorsed
    presentation rubric as the final evaluation tool.
    Panel members should receive training on using
    the rubric prior to evaluation of student
    presentations.

27
Oral Presentation Student Guidelines
  • Students should dress appropriately.
  • Students should wait for a signal from the review
    board committee prior to beginning their
    presentation.
  • Students should begin by introducing themselves
    to the review board.
  • Students should not chew gum.
  • Students should be aware of body language and
    avoid gestures that might adversely affect their
    presentation.

28
Oral Presentation Student Guidelines
  • Students should maintain eye contact with the
    review board.
  • Students should not read their presentation.
  • Students should write a letter of introduction
    for inclusion in their portfolio. Panel members
    should read this letter prior to listening to the
    presentation.
  • Students should practice their presentation
    several times until they feel comfortable with
    its format and content. Students should also time
    their presentation to ensure comfort with the
    10-minute time limit.

29
Oral Presentation Student Guidelines
  • 10. Students should attempt to anticipate what
    questions the review board might ask and plan the
    answers they would give. If students are asked
    questions they feel are inappropriate, or they
    feel is not related to their research, they
    should reply that it is not related to their
    research.

30
Exercise Time!
31
Applying the Presentation Rubric
  • Lets look at some student presentations and
    apply the rubric.

32
Questions
?
33
Part IV Training Review Boards
34
Review Board Simulation
  • Create a review board sub committee.
  • This sub committee should help the Graduation
    Project Coordinator prepare for Graduation
    Project Review Boards.

35
Review Board Simulation
  • Provide a minimum 30 45 minute training on
    using the rubrics.
  • Provide a schedule (include student names and
    time slots to keep the committee on schedule)
    schedule breaks if possible.
  • Discuss the mentor component (have mentor forms
    available for volunteers).
  • Provide refreshments if possible.
  • Remind your administration to greet the review
    board members.
  • Make sure each committee member has (folder,
    rubrics, writing utensil, paper).

36
NC Graduation Project ReviewPanel Guidelines
  • A graduation project review panel member is a
    community, faculty or central office staff member
    who accepts the following responsibilities
  • Allocate time and arrange to attend the oral
    presentation.
  • Ask clarifying questions at the end of the
    presentation.
  • Be consistent and fair in evaluating projects.

37
NC Graduation Project ReviewPanel Guidelines
  • Be mindful of non-verbal communication during the
    presentation.
  • Evaluate the success or failure of the project in
    accordance with the state-endorsed rubrics
    provided.
  • Preview/examine the students portfolio to become
    familiar with their project.
  • Attend training provided by the school site on
    using the state-endorsed rubrics

38
Additional Guidelines for Review Panel Members
  • Be mindful of your body language to students.
  • Smile and nod to reassure students.
  • Do not eat while students are presenting.
  • Do not challenge a students presentation or
    students personal views.
  • Do not interrupt a students presentation.
  • Do not ask questions in the middle of a students
    presentation.

39
NC Graduation Project ReviewPanel Guidelines
  • Always ask questions following a students
    presentation.
  • Give the students presentation your full
    attention, remember they have worked hard.
  • Do not focus on the grade or the graduation
    requirement, evaluate them only using the
    components of the rubric.
  • When in doubt, ask your review panel captain or
    your Graduation Project Coordinator.

40
Questions
?
41
Part VI The Mentor Component
42
NC Graduation Project Mentor Description
  • A graduation project mentor is a community and/or
    faculty member who has experience with the
    project topic and accepts the following
    responsibilities
  • Mentors can have a significant role in guiding
    students through successful completion of the
    Graduation Project. Tutor and coach are synonyms
    for mentor. Ideally, mentor and mentee will work
    together in a positive and collaborative effort.
  • Allocates time and makes arrangements to work
    with the student on the project.
  • Provides suggestions and advice to the student on
    applicable aspects of the research paper,
    product, portfolio and oral presentation.

43
NC Graduation Project Mentor Description
  • Provides accurate and honest verification of the
    students work.
  • Serves as a support and resource to the student
    in all stages of the graduation project process.
  • Signs and returns all required forms.

44
Mentor Guidelines
  • Mentors should be available to meet with students
    at regular intervals to assist with planning and
    implementation of project components.
  • Mentors should sign student logs as documentation
    of contact hours.
  • Mentors should contact students academic
    advisors or Graduation Project Coordinators if
    questions arise about the students progress.

45
Mentor Guidelines continued
  • Using appropriate rubrics, mentors may provide
    feedback to students on the research-based paper,
    product and portfolio.
  • Mentors should advise students, as necessary,
    during the preparation of the product and monitor
    the product according to the rubric.
  • Mentors should attend in-service sessions
    established by the school.

46
Training of Mentors
  • Training of mentors should include the following
    topics
  • Overview of the NC Graduation Project
  • Project Approval Selection and narrowing of
    topics
  • Mentor selection
  • Research Phase of the Project (documentation)
  • Paper Phase (reader training)
  • Product Phase
  • Oral Presentation
  • Evaluation of the NC Graduation Project
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