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Develop IEPs to Access and Connect IEP Objectives to the General Education Curriculum

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... be Considered in Developing PLEP/PLOP. Student's strengths. Parent concerns ... Measurable intermediate steps or milestones between the PLOP and the annual goal ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Develop IEPs to Access and Connect IEP Objectives to the General Education Curriculum


1
Develop IEPs to Access and Connect IEP
Objectives to the General Education Curriculum
  • Lanett Willis Brailey
  • Education Specialist
  • Virginia Department of Education
  • August 2003

2
Why?the General Education Curriculum?
3
Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
  • Emphasizes the integration of supplementary
    services and instructional supports within
    general education classrooms to ensure that
    students have access to challenging and
    stimulating learning environments. (access to the
    general education curriculum)
  • Requires the participation of students with
    disabilities in all large-scale assessment
    activities.

4
IDEA
  • Provides that students with disabilities are to
    be educated with children who are not disabled,
    to the maximum extent appropriate, and that
    removal of children with disabilities from the
    regular educational environment occurs only when
    the nature or severity of the disability is such
    that education in regular classes with
    supplementary aids and services cannot be
    achieved satisfactorily.
  • Each public agency shall ensure that a continuum
    of placements is available to meet the needs of
    children with disabilities for special education
    and related services.

5
Placement Continuum
  • General education classroom
  • General education classroom consultation
  • General education classroom supportive services
  • Special classes (resource/self-contained)
  • Special day school
  • Hospital/home services
  • Residential school

6
Why a Continuum of Services?
  • Is the law
  • The general education classroom may also be
    stigmatizing
  • General education teachers are not prepared for
    full inclusion
  • General education classrooms may not have
    sufficient resources
  • Research evidence does not support the
    superiority of full inclusion

7
Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
8
Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
9
Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
10
Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
11
Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
12
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health
  • Literacy Skills
  • Science
  • Math
  • Oral Language
  • Reading
  • Written Language
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • Mathematics
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
13
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health
  • Literacy Skills
  • Science
  • Math
  • Learning Strategies
  • Critical Thinking
  • Study and Test
  • Taking Skills
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • Organization
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences
  • Problem Solving

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
14
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health
  • Literacy Skills
  • Science
  • Math
  • Learning Strategies
  • Interpersonal Skills
  • Social Skills
  • Social Skills
  • Self-Advocacy
  • Behavior
  • Competencies
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
15
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health
  • Literacy Skills
  • Science
  • Math
  • Learning Strategies
  • Course of Study
  • Social Skills
  • Social Skills
  • Transition
  • Career Development
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • Interagency
  • Responsibility or
  • Needed Linkages
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
16
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • Non-Academic
  • Activities
  • Educational
  • Related
  • Settings
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health

Aids Services
  • Literacy Skills
  • Science
  • Math
  • Learning Strategies

Accommodations
Staff Supports
  • Social Skills
  • Transition

Assistive Technology
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences
  • Extracurricular
  • Activities
  • Educational
  • Setting

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
17
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • Non-Academic
  • Activities
  • Educational
  • Related
  • Settings
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health

Aids Services
  • Science
  • Math

Staff Supports
Accommodations
Assistive Technology
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences

The IEP
  • Extracurricular
  • Activities
  • Educational
  • Setting

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
18
ACCESS TO THE CURRICULUM
  • Non-Academic
  • Activities
  • Educational
  • Related
  • Settings
  • English
  • Foreign
  • Languages
  • Electives
  • Physical
  • Education
  • Health

The IEP
  • Science
  • Math
  • Fine
  • Arts
  • Practical
  • Arts
  • History/
  • Social
  • Sciences
  • Extracurricular
  • Activities
  • Educational
  • Setting

Virginia Department of Education - 8/99
19
Connecting IEP Objectives to the General
Curriculum
20
Objectives
  • Review Individualized Educational Program
  • Process
  • plan
  • Evaluate critical components of IEPs
  • Present level of educational performance
  • Measurable annual goals, short term objectives
    and benchmarks and measuring progress

21
IDEA Expectations
  • Goal is for the student to make progress in the
    general curriculum
  • Progress is reported
  • student report cards and progress in meeting
    goals in the general curriculum
  • school report cards

22
IDEA
  • Assessment tools and strategies
  • Gather information to enable the child to be
    involved and progress in the general curriculum
  • IEP
  • How the childs disability affects involvement
    and progress in the general curriculum

23
General Curriculum
  • Same curriculum used with children without
    disabilities adopted by the school for all
    children from preschool through secondary school
  • Schools curriculum that is based on the
    Standards of Learning

24
What is an IEP?
  • Cornerstone of special education program
  • Binding agreement
  • Communication tool
  • Placement document
  • Access to curriculum

25
IEP
  • Where is the student now?
  • Where will the student be in a year?
  • How will the student get there?

26
IEP Content
  • Where is the student now?
  • Demographic information
  • Present level of Educational Performance

27
IEP Content
  • Where will the student be in a year?
  • Measurable Annual Goals, Short term
    objectives/Benchmarks
  • Measuring and reporting progress

28
IEP Content
  • How will the student get there?
  • Accommodations/Modifications
  • Participation in Assessments
  • Special Education and Related services
  • Least Restrictive Environment
  • Placement
  • Prior Notice/Consent

29
Additional Content, as needed
  • Factors for IEP Team Considerations
  • Strengths of student, parent concerns
  • Evaluation results, behavior
  • Braille instruction, assistive technology
  • Communication needs
  • Transition
  • Age of majority
  • Extended School Year

30
Factors to be Considered in Developing PLEP/PLOP
for the areas affected by the disability
  • Students strengths
  • Parent concerns
  • Evaluation results
  • behavior
  • Language needs
  • Braille instruction
  • Communication needs
  • Assistive technology

31
Present Level of Educational Performance
  • Strengths of the student
  • Areas of concern
  • Instructional needs
  • Style of learning
  • Assessment information
  • How the disability affects involvement and
    progress in the general curriculum

32
Data Sources
  • Standardized tests
  • School records
  • Checklists skills, behavior
  • Teacher observations and records
  • Student work samples, portfolios
  • Parent/student input

33
Reporting Test Scores on PLEP
  • Full name of the test, level, form, and date
    administered
  • Do not abbreviate
  • List all the subtests
  • Percentiles and standard scores
  • Grade and age scores only if percentiles and
    standard scores are not available
  • Compute based on age norms

34
Documenting Data Sources
  • Classroom observation (10/15) confirmed...
  • Interviews with parents and other teachers from
    9/27-9/29 indicated...
  • A review of completed homework assignments
    (10/13-10/30) revealed...
  • From an administration of the Woodcock-JohnsonTest
    s of Achievement, Revised given March 10, ...

35
Sample of Section of PLEP
Jay appears to have two friends with whom he eats
lunch and converses during free time (teacher
observation 10/15-1/27). He enjoys basketball,
and asks to talk with the coach about once a
week. Jay reports being bored in school (student
interview, 1/27). While in class, Jay talks out
on an average of 8 times per 50 min. period in
academic subjects. Approximately half of these
talk-outs consist of profane or aggressive
statements (teacher observation,12/1-12/23). He
has been suspended on 4 of the last 9 days for
talking out, using profanity, and making verbal
threats toward teachers (referrals 1/8-1/27).

36
Evaluation Activity 1Present Level of
Performance
37
Translating PLEP into Goals
  • Projected student progress for one school year
  • Based on students documented needs that
  • enable involvement in general curriculum
  • result from the students disability
  • are priorities
  • advance the vision
  • Reasonable number
  • Measurable

38
SOLs in IEPs?
  • Address the skills the student needs to
    participate and progress in the general
    curriculum, but do not replicate the curriculum
    goals. The IEP goals describe the additional or
    unique needs that are to be addressed in order
    for the student to achieve the curricular
    goals/standards.
  • (Individualized Education Program IEP Process
    The Corner Stone of Special Education, 1998)

39
Literacy Skills(Overlap With Primary Curriculum)
  • English
  • Oral Language
  • Reading/Literature
  • Writing
  • Research
  • Math

40
Learning Strategies
  • Memorizing
  • Critical thinking
  • Study skills
  • note-taking, organizing materials and time,
    completing assignments and projects, staying on
    task
  • Test-taking
  • studying for tests, testing strategies
  • Problem solving

41
Daily Living Skills
  • Managing finances
  • Selecting and managing a household
  • Caring for personal needs
  • Raising children and meeting marriage
    responsibilities

42
Daily Living Skills
  • Buying, preparing, and consuming food
  • Buying and caring for clothing
  • Exhibiting responsible citizenship
  • Utilizing recreational facilities and engaging in
    leisure
  • Getting around the community

43
Transition
  • Transition Planning (by age 14)
  • Course of study
  • Plan transition service needs

44
Transition
  • Transition Services (by age 16)
  • Career development
  • Higher education or training
  • Employment/career exploration
  • Interagency responsibilities and linkages
  • Adult services
  • Independent living
  • Taking part in the community

45
Annual Goal Content
  • The learner
  • Skill or behavior
  • Criteria
  • Quantity words
  • Present level and target level
  • Time reference if the skill is to be completed
    before the end of the IEP

46
Sample Measurable Annual Goal
  • Learner
  • Behavior
  • Criteria
  • Time
  • reference

Jay will use appropriate language in interacting
with adults in a school setting as indicated by
zero referrals for profanity or threats by
April 1.
47
Procedures for Measuring Annual Goals
  • Curriculum/teacher-made tests/quizzes
  • Criterion-referenced tests
  • Teacher/therapist observation
  • Checklists
  • Written performance
  • Oral performance
  • Demonstration/project
  • Running record/informal reading inventory
  • Classroom Participation/Homework

48
Identify the Annual Goal Parts
  • Ginny will increase silent reading of fiction
    passages of her choice from 0 to at least 20
    minutes daily as documented by teacher
    observation by April 1.
  • Joshua will increase appropriate (by raising his
    hand and being recognized by the teacher before
    speaking) class participation from one to at
    least 4 times weekly as measured by a
    self-checking system during social studies
    classes.

49
Miserable to Measurable
  • Norman will increase reading skills.
  • Norman will answer comprehension questions
    based on 8th grade texts with at least 70
    accuracy.
  • Sangeeta will work more independently.
  • Sangeeta will increase assignment completion
    from three to ten written assignments per week
    with two or fewer prompts per assignment by
    January.

50
Miserable to Measurable
  • Rewrite at least two of these goals so that
    they are measurable. You have 5 minutes.
  • Tomika will strengthen her writing skills.
  • Louis will make measurable progress in math.
  • Tres will behave better.
  • Andre will increase his articulation.
  • Blake will do better on tests.

51
Evaluation Activity2Miserable to Measurable
52
Short Term Objectives and Benchmarks
  • Measurable intermediate steps or milestones
    between the PLOP and the annual goal
  • Provide a way for teachers, parents, and
    students to understand whether the student is
    making progress toward the goal
  • May mix STOs and benchmarks in an IEP but not
    within a goal

53
Short Term Objectives Content
  • Learner
  • Skill or behavior
  • Procedures How will I measure?
  • Schedule How often will I measure?
  • Criteria How well is the student
  • expected to do?

54
Sample Short Term Objective
  • Learner
  • Skill or
  • behavior
  • Procedures
  • Schedule
  • Criteria
  • Sam
  • will record all assignments using a daily planner
  • as measured by teacher observation daily.
  • on 4 out of 5 days
  • all

55
Identify the Short Term Objective Parts
  • Dennis will copy correctly formed cursive letters
    at the rate of 20 per minute as documented on
    precision timings once a week.
  • Sabetha will solve up to three step word problems
    with at least 90 accuracy on teacher-made tests
    weekly.

56
Benchmark Contents
  • Who
  • Skill or behavior
  • Criteria
  • By when

57
Sample Benchmarks
  • Sam will comply with teacher directions without
    arguing 60 of the opportunities by October 15.
  • Sam will comply with teacher directions without
    arguing70 of the opportunities by January 30.
  • Sam will comply with teacher directions without
    arguing 80 of the opportunities by April 15.

58
Identify the Benchmark Parts
  • Frank will increase writing fluency from 6 to 10
    words per minute by October 15.
  • Jeffrey will increase assignment completion rate
    from 3 to 8 per week by November 30.
  • Karla will respond to written writing prompts
    with at least two complete paragraphs by December
    15.

59
STO Benchmark
  • 5 parts
  • Learner
  • Skill/behavior
  • Schedule
  • Procedures
  • Criteria
  • developing different skills
  • 4 parts
  • Learner
  • Skill
  • Criteria
  • Date
  • increasing accuracy or rate of same skill

60
Resources
  • Bateman, B., Linden, M. (1998). Better IEPs
    How to develop legally correct and educationally
    useful programs (3rd ed). Longmont, CO Sopris
    West.
  • Council for Exceptional Children. (1999). IEP
    team guide. Reston, VA Council for Exceptional
    Children.
  • The Administrators Role in the IEP Process
  • Carolyn Ito, M.Ed., Ed.S.

61
Free Resources
  • Virginia Department of Education. (1998).
    Individualized education program IEP process The
    cornerstone of special education Richmond
    Virginia Department of Education.
  • IEP Tool Kit - www.pen.k12.va.us/VDOE/Instruction/
    Sped./toolkit-main.html

62
T/TAC Resources
  • William and Mary T/TAC
  • Http//wm.edu/ttac
  • Quarterly Newsletter Link Lines
  • Considerations Packet - The Heart of the IEP

63
VDOE Sample IEP
  • The Present Level of Educational Performance
    describes the effect of the students disability
    upon the students involvement and progress in
    the general curriculum and area(s) of need. This
    includes the students performance in academic
    areas (reading, math, communication, etc.) and
    non-academic areas (behavior, social skills,
    daily life activities, mobility, extra-curricular
    activities, etc.) in objective terms. Test
    scores, if appropriate, should be
    self-explanatory or an explanation should be
    included. For preschool students this section
    should include how the students disability
    affects the students participation in
    appropriate activities. There should be a direct
    relationship between the present level of
    educational performance and the other components
    of the IEP.

64
PLEP Activity
  • Read the PLEP.
  • Use the checklist for Present Level of
    Performance Descriptions to evaluate the PLEP.
  • Find 3 good features to share.
  • Find at least one feature that needs to be
    improved. Be ready to suggest how.

65
PLEP to Annual Goal to Benchmarks
  • PLEP Peter follows adult directions within 5
    seconds 45 of the time.
  • Goal Peter will follow appropriate adult
    directions within 5 seconds without negative
    comment or facial expression.
  • Benchmark 1 Peter will follow appropriate adult
    directions in 75 of the opportunities for 3
    consecutive days by 2/15.
  • Benchmark 2 Peter will follow adult directions
    in 90 of the opportunities for 5 consecutive
    days by 3/15.

66
Making the Connection
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