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Iowa Valley Community College

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Regional Assets, Forming the Region, and Data-driven Decision Making ... The Grateful Dead. 15. RIGS and WIRED. What does R.I.G. stand for? REGIONAL INNOVATION GRANT ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Iowa Valley Community College


1
REGIONAL INNOVATION LEADERSHIP GROUP MEETING Your
Vision…Your Future!
REGIONAL INNOVATION LEADERSHIP GROUP MEETING
  • Iowa Valley Community College
  • December 5, 2007

2
Welcome!
  • Newton Mayor Chaz Allen
  • Marshalltown Mayor Gene Beach
  • Iowa Workforce Development Director Elisabeth Buck

3
Agenda
  • Why are we here?
  • WIRED/RIG Framework and Process
  • Application in Central Iowa Your Roles
  • Regional Assets, Forming the Region, and
    Data-driven Decision Making
  • Visioning a compelling future
  • Core Teams Work
  • Beyond Today Our Next Steps

4
The Need for Transformation
  • America is witnessing one of the greatest
    economic transformations in history

5
Chinas size does not merely enable low-cost
manufacturing it forces it. Increasingly, it is
what Chinese businesses and consumers choose for
themselves that determines how the American
economy operates. Ted Fishman/The
Chinese Century The New York Times Magazine
6
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8
ETA Innovation Academy
9
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13
The Bottom Line Driver
There is no job that is Americas God-given
right anymore. We have to compete for jobs.
Carly Fiorina,
former Hewlett Packard CEO
14
So…what are we doing here?
  • Somebody has got
  • to do something, and its just incredibly
    pathetic
  • that it has got to be us!

- The Grateful Dead
15
RIGS and WIRED
  • What does R.I.G. stand for?
  • REGIONAL INNOVATION GRANT
  • What does W.I.R.E.D. stand for?
  • WORKFORCE INNOVATION IN REGIONAL ECONOMIC
    DEVELOPMENT

16
Regionalizing
  • It is todays economic reality
  • economic shocks do not recognize borders
  • Infrastructure (physical virtual) means workers
    and work are further apart
  • Only a regional economy can contain all the
    necessary assets to compete
  • Regional collaboration fosters innovation
  • offers a global competitive advantage

17
The WIRED approach is a comprehensive strategy to
develop regional talent development systems that
drive regional economic competitiveness, job
growth and new opportunities for American workers.
Higher Education
Industry
Workforce System
Other
Adult Education
Lifelong Learning
Pre-School, K - 12
18
The WIRED Framework
19
Economic Development Models
  • OLD Model Characterized by competition across
    political borders (state and local)
  • NEW Model Characterized by an innovative,
    collaborative culture within regional economic
    zones

20
Planning Blueprint
21
STEP 1 Identify the Regional Economy
  • Forming Region Data-based identification of
    the surrounding communities and counties that
    share a regional economy.
  • Continually assess and reassess the boundaries to
    include assets, organizations and resources
    necessary for growth!

22
An Economic Region is a Collection of Assets
  • What surrounding areas share the same economic
    structure? What are our collective assets?
  • Legal/regulatory environment
  • Quality of life
  • Business policy culture
  • MOST IMPORTANT NETWORKS!
  • Human capital
  • Financial capital
  • Research and development
  • Industrial base
  • Infrastructure

23
STEP 2 Form Core Leadership Group
planning entities
business industry leaders
economic workforce development organizations
other regional champions
Core Leadership Group
state local government leaders
research development laboratories
foundations
faith-based community organizations
investors entrepreneurs
philanthropic organizations
education entities
24
Leadership Group Must…
  • Represent critical partners/organizations
  • Commitment from senior executives
  • Collaborate in SWOT analysis
  • Asset mapping, critical self-assessment
  • Appropriately shared financial and resource
    contribution to the partnership
  • Provide resources, expertise, promising
    practices, research…and STRATEGIES

25
STEP 3 SWOT Analysis
  • Discover strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and
    threats Key Questions
  • Are physical, virtual and governmental
    infrastructures prepared to establish and sustain
    a prosperous regional economy?
  • Do we have the right workforce to support and
    sustain our plans?
  • Are educational infrastructures prepared to
    develop sufficient talent?
  • Do we have a culture of collaboration, innovation
    and entrepreneurship?

26
STEP 4 Establish a Shared Regional
Identity
  • PARTNERS
  • Identify with the region as a whole
  • Accept their economic interdependence across
    sectors and jurisdictions within the region, and
  • Commit to collaborating to ensure regional
    economic competitiveness
  • Brand the Region

27
STEP 5 Devise Strategies
  • Devise strategies that hold the greatest
    potential to spur investment in
  • Talent development
  • Innovation
  • Infrastructure

28
Leadership Group Roles
  • Provide leadership that transcends turf
  • Find a common, unifying theme and focus
  • Identify innovative solutions that
  • Leverage regional strengths
  • Mitigate regional weaknesses/limitations
  • Are divided into investments in infrastructure,
    innovation and talent development

29
Leadership Group Roles (2)
  • Divide leaders into Core Teams
  • Entrepreneurism
  • Infrastructure
  • Education and workforce system Alignment with
    Industry
  • Workforce and Industry Information
  • Identify funding sources
  • Compile Integrated Plan
  • Devise governance structure going forward

30
STEP 6 Leverage Resources and
Implement
Cash
Federal State Program Resources
VISION for Regional Economy
Faith-based Community Organizations
Government
Intellectual Property
Community Foundation Investments
Business Industry
Patents on Innovations Not Yet Marketed
Broadband Capacity
Individual Investors
Philanthropic Organizations
31
Project Milestones
  • Today!
  • Core Team conference calls
  • January 11 Second face-to-face meeting
  • Core Team conference calls
  • Mid-February Third face-to-face meeting
  • Core Team Conference calls
  • Early March Executive Committee compiles
    integrated Plan
  • Late March Plan presented to full Leadership
    Group

32
Social Network Mapping
  • June Holley The Network Weaver
  • Surveys of LG members in December and March
  • Identify existing networks Initial maps
  • Identify ways to enhance and expand networks
  • Re-draw maps, install metrics to show
    effectiveness and areas of potential

33
The Benefits
  • Offers a regional economic planning model
  • Direction for communities in transition
  • Provides a framework for effectively
  • Avoiding economic traumas
  • Responding to unexpected economic events
  • Assists in quick and effective response
  • Provides a framework for . . .
  • Collaborative decision-making
  • Effective communication and social networking

34
In Summary
  • Globalization brings new challenges to American
    workers as we face intense competition from new
    sources.
  • The WIRED approach is a comprehensive strategy to
    develop regional talent development systems that
    drive regional economic competitiveness, job
    growth and new opportunities for American workers
  • WIRED has been a catalyst for the development of
    a regionally-based response to global economic
    conditions one that focuses on building a
    broader Talent Management Strategy to fuel
    economic growth!

35
UNDERSTANDING REGIONAL ASSETS
UNDERSTANDING REGIONAL ASSETS AND FORMING THE
ECONOMIC REGION
36
Key Questions
  • What are the regional resources that could be
    incorporated into a development effort?
  • What counties should be included in the economic
    transformation region?

37
Future Questions
  • What industry clusters should the region target?
  • What assets could the region use to recruit
    targeted industry clusters?
  • What infrastructure challenges are there and
    which ones is this group capable of addressing?
  • What workforce and education gaps need to be
    filled in order to ensure a ready supply of
    skilled workers?

38
Three Objectives
  • Summarize asset mapping process with key findings
  • Present proposed economic transformation region
  • The Forming Region
  • Highlight emerging strengths

39
Asset Mapping Process
  • Finding a starting point
  • Its easier to start with a broad region and
    narrow as you go
  • Existing literature
  • IDWD survey showed workers would travel a maximum
    of 26 miles one way
  • Researchers Eathington and Swenson from ISU
    analyzed Census commuting patterns showing a
    similar willingness to travel for the right
    employment opportunity

40
Asset Mapping Process
  • Starting region based on existing literature

41
Asset Mapping Process
  • Asset Region (added Dallas and Tama)

42
Asset Mapping Process
  • Key components
  • Population Characteristics
  • Economic Indicators
  • Financial Capital
  • Infrastructure
  • Industry Characteristics
  • Workforce Competencies
  • Educational Output

43
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Distinct division in characteristic growth
    between the three county region of Polk, Dallas
    and Warren, and the seven county region

44
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Polk, Dallas and Warren characterized by
  • Overall high net migration
  • Growth in early to mid career age cohorts in
    Dallas County
  • Higher median wage met by higher costs
  • Highest concentration of degree holding residents
    (including Story County)
  • Strong growth in Finance and Insurance,
    Professional and Technical Services, and
    Information
  • High concentration of Business and Technical
    workforce competencies
  • All three included in the MSA

45
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Seven county region characterized by
  • Minimal net migration
  • Higher growth in late career age cohorts
  • Lower median wage met by lower costs
  • Lower concentration of degree holding residents
    but…
  • Capacity for innovation as indicated by patent
    generation
  • Transportation infrastructure and growing
    communications infrastructure
  • Despite declines in some areas Manufacturing
    remains strong along with Health Care and
    Professional and Technical Services
  • High concentration of engineering and
  • technology workforce competencies

46
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Concentration of late career population, 50 to
    64, 2006

47
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Growth in early to mid career population, 15 to
    49 by ZIP code, 2006

48
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Concentration of population with college degree,
    2006

49
Asset Mapping Findings
  • 2006 Net migration

50
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Median rent for two bedroom unit, 2007

51
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Capacity for innovation (patents per 1000
    residents), 2005, 2006
  • Counties with more patents per 1000 residents
    than the national average include Jasper, Story,
    Marion, Marshall, Mahaska, and Warren

52
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Iowa-based venture funds

53
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Transportation Infrastructure
  • Data limitations
  • Infrastructure indicated by transportation
    industry base
  • Polk, Dallas and Story Counties have the largest
    employment in transportation industries such as
    trucking and warehousing and storage
  • Dallas, Marion, Mahaska, Jasper and Tama have the
    highest relative concentration

54
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Transportation Infrastructure

55
ASSET MAPPING FINDINGS
  • Communications Infrastructure
  • Data limitations
  • Infrastructure indicated by communications
    industry base
  • Polk County has the largest employment in
    communications industries such as wired
    telecommunications, satellite telecommunications,
    internet service providers, etc.
  • Polk, Jasper, Warren, and Poweshiek have the
    highest relative concentration

56
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Communications Infrastructure

57
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Economic/Export Base
  • Quantifies which industry sectors are exporting,
    bringing new money into the region, and as a
    result, driving regional jobs and earnings

58
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Economic/Export Base
  • Polk
  • Finance, Services, Construction
  • Dallas
  • Finance, Services, Construction
  • Warren
  • Residents Outside Income, Services, Construction

59
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Economic/Export Base
  • Story
  • Government, Manufacturing, Services
  • Marshall, Jasper, Marion, Mahaska
  • Manufacturing, Services, Government/Construction
  • Poweshiek
  • Services (Educational, Grinnell College),
    Manufacturing, Construction
  • Tama
  • Government (Tribal Casino), Agriculture, Services

60
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Workforce competencies Economics Accounting

61
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Workforce Competencies Administration
    Management

62
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Workforce Competencies Mechanical

63
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Workforce Competencies Production Processing

64
Asset Mapping Findings
  • Workforce Competencies Engineering Technology

65
Forming the Region
  • How should this information influence decisions
    about forming the region?
  • What qualities contribute to a successful
    transformation region?
  • Stakeholder involvement
  • Shared strengths and challenges

66
Proposed Economic Transformation Region
  • Story, Marshall, Tama, Jasper, Poweshiek, Marion
    and Mahaska

67
Emerging Strengths
  • Largest industry clusters
  • Agribusiness, Food Processing Technology
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Biomedical/Biotechnical (Life Sciences)
  • Business Financial Services
  • Energy (Fossil Renewable)

68
Emerging Strengths
  • Fastest growing industry clusters
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Biomedical/Biotechnical (Life Sciences)
  • Business Financial Services
  • Education Knowledge Creation
  • Arts, Entertainment, Recreation Visitor
    Industries

69
Emerging Strengths
  • Most competitive industry clusters
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Energy (Fossil Renewable)
  • Business Financial Services
  • Education Knowledge Creation
  • Biomedical/Biotechnical (Life Sciences)

70
Emerging Strengths
  • Most specialized industry clusters
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Agribusiness, Food Processing Technology
  • Mining
  • Education Knowledge Creation
  • Printing Publishing

71
Visioning our Future
Visioning our Future
72
Core Team Meeting Process
  • Complete detailed sign-in sheet/roster
  • Resume exercise Discuss and hand-in
  • Focus/Revise Teams agenda/charge
  • Set time and objectives for first Core Team
    virtual meeting
  • Collaborative Work Space
  • Chair/Co-Chairs

73
Next Steps
  • Review Collaborative Work Space Postings
  • Determine additional information/data needs
    produce reports supply to Core Teams
  • Education SWOT Analysis
  • General SWOT Analysis
  • Career Audit
  • Industry Focus Reports
  • Virtual Core Team Calls
  • January 11 In-person Meeting
  • Recruit LG Chair/Co-Chairs

74
Collaborative Work Space (CWS)
75
CWS Features
  • Document retrieval and keyword search
  • Documents filed by Core Team, where appropriate
  • Core Team and LG member contact information
  • All LG attendees will be registered by end of
    week
  • Username first initial last name (Rmaher)
  • Password password

76
Thanks!
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