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English 10 Grammar and Mechanics

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Title: English 10 Grammar and Mechanics


1
English 10 Grammar and Mechanics
  • 1st Semester, 2008 -2009

2
Directions
  • On Tuesdays, you need to write down the examples,
    definitions, and rules that correspond with the
    weeks grammar focus.
  • On Thursdays, you need to complete the activity
    using the grammar focus definitions and rules.

3
Week One Words Often Confused whose, whos
  • Whose
  • Possessive form of who
  • Whose book is this?
  • Whose shoes are these?
  • It doesnt really matter whose fault it is.
  • Whos
  • Contraction of who is or who has
  • Whos there?
  • Whos been coaching them?
  • I dont know whos taller?

4
Week One Words Often Confused whose, whos
  • (Whose, Whos) going to use that ticket now?
  • I am concerned about (whose, whos) paper was
    submitted without a name.
  • Do you know (whose, whos) responsible for
    leaving such a mess?
  • (Whose, Whos) the new student in P.E. class?

5
Week One Words Often Confused whose, whos
  • (Whose, Whos) going to use that ticket now?
  • I am concerned about (whose, whos) paper was
    submitted without a name.
  • Do you know (whose, whos) responsible for
    leaving such a mess?
  • (Whose, Whos) the new student in P.E. class?

6
Week Two Words Often Confused weather, whether
  • Weather
  • Noun that conditions outdoors
  • As the meteorologist predicted, the weather has
    been perfect all week.
  • Presence of dark clouds are usually a sign of
    ominous weather to come.
  • The arctic is known for extremely cold weather.
  • Whether
  • Indicates alternative or doubt
  • They dont know whether or not they will go to
    the concert next weekend.
  • I have not decided whether to wear jeans or
    shorts.
  • I plan on going to the movies whether my best
    friends want to or not.

7
Week TwoWords Often Confused weather, whether
  • (Weather, Whether) or not it rains, we will be
    there.
  • Dont you agree that this is fine (weather,
    whether) for a softball game?
  • This is a hard time for teens to grow up in
    America (weather, whether) or not they have a
    friend or family member enlisted in the military.
  • I prefer warmer (weather, whether) to cooler.

8
Week TwoWords Often Confused weather, whether
  • (Weather, Whether) or not it rains, we will be
    there.
  • Dont you agree that this is fine (weather,
    whether) for a softball game?
  • This is a hard time for teens to grow up in
    America (weather, whether) or not they have a
    friend or family member enlisted in the military.
  • I prefer warmer (weather, whether) to cooler.

9
Week ThreeWords Often Confused to, two, too
  • Two
  • Adjective- the sum of one one noun- number
    between one and three
  • She will graduate in two years.
  • Two of my friends and I purchased concert
    tickets.
  • I own two dogs.
  • To
  • Preposition also
  • part of the
  • infinitive
  • form of a verb
  • Please return these
  • books to the library.
  • He began to whistle.
  • I could see that the
  • little girl wanted to
  • cry.
  • Too
  • Adverb- also more than enough
  • The young man is a musician and an athlete, too.
  • Some may believe you are too young to drive.
  • I too would like a serving of ice cream.

10
Week Three Words Often Confused to, two, too
  • There was (to, two, too) much traffic on the
    interstate for us to enjoy the drive.
  • The bell rang and I hurried (to, two, too) class
    to avoid being late.
  • You, (to, two, too) can be a better writer if you
    are willing to try.
  • I decided (to, two, too) buy (to, two, too) new
    pairs of shoes over the weekend.

11
Week Three Words Often Confused to, two, too
  • There was (to, two, too) much traffic on the
    interstate for us to enjoy the drive.
  • My boyfriend did not believe me, but I did not go
    (to, two, too) the movies with another boy.
  • You, (to, two, too) can be a better writer if you
    are willing to try.
  • I decided (to, two, too) buy (to, two, too) new
    pairs of shoes over the weekend.

12
Week Four Words Often Confused REVIEW
  • I just couldnt make up my mind (weather,
    whether) to go to the beach or a BBQ this
    weekend.
  • I have always wanted (to, two, too) visit the
    large cities in Europe.
  • (Whose, Whos) going to use that ticket now?
  • My Mom recently accused me of being (to, two,
    too) hard on my little brother).
  • (Whose, Whos) picture is hanging on the
    refrigerator?
  • The cloud free sky this morning seemed promising
    of favorable (weather, whether).

13
Week Four Words Often Confused REVIEW
  • I just couldnt make up my mind (weather,
    whether) to go to the beach or a BBQ this
    weekend.
  • I have always wanted (to, two, too) visit the
    large cities in Europe.
  • (Whose, Whos) going to use that ticket now?
  • My Mom recently accused me of being (to, two,
    too) hard on my little brother).
  • (Whose, Whos) picture is hanging on the
    refrigerator?
  • The cloud free sky this morning seemed promising
    of favorable (weather, whether).

14
Week Four Words Often Confused REVIEW
  • Write sentences using all seven words often
    confused and at least 3 words of the week from
    the past three weeks. You may combine the
    sentences, tell a story, or write individual
    sentences.
  • Whose, Whos
  • Weather, Whether
  • To, Two, Too

15
Week FivePunctuation commas- items in a series
  • Use commas to separate items in a series.
  • The camp counselor distributed baseballs, bats,
    volleyballs, tennis rackets, and bandages.
  • We have a government of the people, by the
    people, and for the people.
  • I know I will pass the test if I take good notes,
    if I study hard, and if I get a good nights
    sleep.
  • Use commas to separate two or more adjectives
    preceding a noun.
  • Ive had a long, hectic, tiring day.
  • For lunch we had smooth, creamy broccoli soup.
  • I would like to save for a shiny, new, red car.

16
Week FivePunctuation commas- items in a series
  • Correct the following sentences by adding
    commas where they are needed.
  • I took a flashlight a sleeping bag extra tennis
    shoes a rod and reel and a parka on our camping
    trip.
  • With a quick powerful leap, the stunt double
    bounded over the burning balcony.
  • We looked in the sink on the floor and on Kims
    clothing for her missing contact lens.
  • The river overflowed again and filled our
    basement and drenched our neighbors carpet.

17
Week FivePunctuation commas- items in a series
  • Correct the following sentences by adding
    commas where they are needed.
  • I took a flashlight, a sleeping bag, extra tennis
    shoes, a rod and reel, and a parka on our camping
    trip.
  • With a quick, powerful leap, the stunt double
    bounded over the burning balcony.
  • We looked in the sink, on the floor, and on Kims
    clothing for her missing contact lens.
  • The river overflowed again and filled our
    basement and drenched our neighbors carpet.

18
Week SixCommas- independent clauses, and
nonessential clauses and phrases
  • Independent Clauses
  • Use a comma before and, but, for, nor, or, so, or
    yet when the conjunction joins independent
    clauses.
  • Patrick brought the sandwiches, and Cindy brought
    the potato salad.
  • We got there on time, but Jeff and Maria were
    late.
  • He was apprehensive, yet he was also excited.
  • The bears failed to catch any salmon, so they
    went away.
  • Nonessential Clauses and Phrases
  • Use commas to set off nonessential subordinate
    clauses and nonessential participial phrases.
  • Emilia Ortiz, who lives across the street from
    me, won a scholarship to Stanford University.
  • The capital of Massachusetts is Boston, which is
    sometimes called the Athens of America.
  • Born in Detroit, Robert Hayden was educated at
    the University of Michigan and later became a
    distinguished professor there.

19
Week SixCommas- independent clauses, and
nonessential clauses and phrases
  • Correct the following sentences by adding
    commas where they are needed.
  • She did not like the story in the science fiction
    magazine nor did she enjoy the illustrations.
  • Saunders who lived in Memphis, Tennessee named
    his stores Piggly Wiggly.
  • Noticing that people often had difficulty finding
    products Albert Gerrard opened his own grocery
    store.
  • The movie review complimented all the performers
    but the leading actress received the strongest
    praise.
  • Developed by Michael Cullen the model for todays
    huge supermarkets opened in an abandoned garage
    in New York in 1930.

20
Week SixCommas- independent clauses, and
nonessential clauses and phrases
  • Correct the following sentences by adding
    commas where they are needed.
  • She did not like the story in the science fiction
    magazine, nor did she enjoy the illustrations.
  • Saunders, who lived in Memphis, Tennessee, named
    his stores Piggly Wiggly.
  • Noticing that people often had difficulty finding
    products, Albert Gerrard opened his own grocery
    store.
  • The movie review complimented all the performers,
    but the leading actress received the strongest
    praise.
  • Developed by Michael Cullen, the model for
    todays huge supermarkets opened in an abandoned
    garage in New York in 1930.

21
Week SevenCommas introductory elements and
interrupters
  • Use commas after certain introductory elements
    such as well, oh, why, yes, or no at the
    beginning of a sentence.
  • Sure, Ill go with you.
  • Oh, look at that car!
  • No, I havent taken the exam yet.
  • Use a comma after an introductory participle or
    participial phrase.
  • Shivering, the couple hurried into the warm lobby
    of the movie theater.
  • Calling for a timeout, the referee blew his
    whistle and signaled.
  • Use commas to set off an expression that
    interrupts a sentence.
  • A senator from Kansas, Nancy Landon Kassebaum,
    was the principal speaker.
  • Do you know him, the boy wearing the blue shirt?
  • Have you read At Home in India, a book by Cynthia
    Bowles?

22
Week SevenCommas introductory elements and
interrupters
  • Correct the following sentences by adding
    commas where they are needed.
  • Yes for many people around the world, meat is not
    a daily food staple.
  • Since many cookbooks now include recipes for
    grain dishes you can learn to use grains in many
    tasty snacks and meals.
  • Between 1500 and 1506, Leonardo da Vinci a
    brilliant man created several major works.
  • My favorite painting Mona Lisa was painted then.

23
Week SevenCommas introductory elements and
interrupters
  • Correct the following sentences by adding commas
    where they are needed.
  • Yes, for many people around the world, meat is
    not a daily food staple.
  • Since many cookbooks now include recipes for
    grain dishes, you can learn to use grains in many
    tasty snacks and meals.
  • Between 1500 and 1506, Leonardo da Vinci, a
    brilliant man, created several major works.
  • My favorite painting, Mona Lisa, was painted then.

24
Week EightApostrophe possessives and
contractions
  • To form the possessive of most singular nouns,
    add an apostrophe and an s.
  • Barbaras house
  • A weeks salary
  • One boys uniform
  • That stereos speaker
  • To form the possessive case of a plural noun
    ending in s, add only the apostrophe.
  • Cats owners
  • Coaches records
  • Cities problems
  • Princesses duties
  • Use an apostrophe to show where letters, words,
    or numerals have been omitted in a contraction.
  • Who iswhos
  • There isthere's
  • Could havecouldve
  • Of the clockoclock
  • Let uslets
  • I wouldId
  • She will shell
  • I amIm
  • You areyoure
  • We hadwed
  • She hasshes
  • Lisa isLisas
  • They aretheyre

25
Week EightApostrophe possessives and
contractions
  • Place apostrophes where necessary in the
    following sentences.
  • I shared my mom and dads exasperation when, once
    again I a whole weeks allowance on disappointing
    pictures. I had borrowed Uncle Freds expensive
    camera, but even with the cameras extra features,
    my photographs looked like childrens smudged
    finger paintings. I had hoped at least my pets
    pictures would come out.
  • Correct the following sentences by placing
    apostrophes where necessary.
  • Whos going to be at Leon and Joshs party?
  • Lets hide and see whether theyll look for us.
  • I cant find the calamata olives and the feta
    cheese for the Greek salad.
  • Is the doctors appointment at nine oclock?

26
Week EightApostrophe possessives and
contractions
  • Place apostrophes where necessary in the
    following sentences.
  • I shared my mom and dads exasperation when, once
    again I a whole weeks allowance on disappointing
    pictures. I had borrowed Uncle Fred's expensive
    camera, but even with the cameras extra
    features, my photographs looked like childrens
    smudged finger paintings. I had hoped at least
    my pets pictures would come out.
  • Correct the following sentences by placing
    apostrophes where necessary.
  • Whos going to be at Leon and Joshs party?
  • Lets hide and see whether theyll look for us.
  • I cant find the calamata olives and the feta
    cheese for the Greek salad.
  • Is the doctors appointment at nine oclock?

27
Week NineSemicolons
  • Use a semicolon between independent clauses that
    are closely related in thought and that are not
    joined by and, but, for, nor, or, so, or yet.
  • Everyone else in my family excels in a particular
    sport I seem to be the only exception.
  • The river is rising rapidly it is expected to
    crest by noon.
  • Use Semicolons between items in a series if the
    items contain commas.
  • In 2000, the three largest metropolitan areas in
    the United States were New York, New York Los
    Angeles, California and Chicago Illinois.
  • You may turn in your book reports on Thursday,
    September 14 Friday, September 15 or Monday,
    September 18.
  • Use a semicolon between independent clauses
    joined by a conjunctive adverb or a transitional
    expression.
  • Lenor is planning to become an engineer however,
    she is also interested in graphic design.
  • Only two people registered for the pottery
    lessons as a result, the class was canceled.
  • Ralph Ellison is best known for his 1952 novel,
    Invisible Man he also, however, wrote short
    stories and essays.
  • Not all birds migrate south for the winter
    cardinals, for instance, can stay in northern
    climates year round.

28
Week NineSemicolons
  • Correct the following sentences by adding commas
    and semicolons where necessary.
  • Would you prefer to live in Boston, Massachusetts
    San Francisco, California or Seattle, Washington?
  • The carvings come from the Oaxaca Valley in fact
    90 percent of the two hundred families who made
    them live in just three villages.
  • Carving has been a tradition among Oaxacans for
    hundreds of years only recently however have the
    artists sold their works outside the valley.
  • Even those carvers whose works have won worldwide
    acclaim have chosen to continue living in the
    valley their ties to their families and
    communities are very strong.

29
Week NineSemicolons
  • Correct the following sentences by adding
    commas and semicolons where necessary.
  • Would you prefer to live in Boston,
    Massachusetts San Francisco, California or
    Seattle, Washington?
  • The carvings come from the Oaxaca Valley in
    fact, 90 percent of the two hundred families who
    made them live in just three villages.
  • Carving has been a tradition among Oaxacans for
    hundreds of years only recently, however, have
    the artists sold their works outside the valley.
  • Even those carvers whose works have won worldwide
    acclaim have chosen to continue living in the
    valley their ties to their families and
    communities are very strong.

30
Week TenColons
  • Use a colon to mean note what follows, before a
    list of items, especially after expressions such
    as the following, and as follows, and before a
    long, formal statement or quotation.
  • In Washington D.C., we visited four important
    national sites the White House, the Washington
    Monument, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, and the
    Lincoln Memorial.
  • The only tools that are allowed are as follows
    pencils, compasses, rulers, and protractor.
  • Thomas Paine's first pamphlet in the series The
    American Crisis starts with the famous words
  • These are the times that try
  • mens souls. The summer
  • soldier and the sunshine patriot
  • will, in this crisis shrink from the
  • service of this country but he that
  • stands it now deserves the love
  • and thanks of man and woman.
  • Use a colon before a statement that explains or
    clarifies a preceding statement and in certain
    conventional situations (between the hour and the
    minute, between a title and subtitle, and after
    the salutation of a business letter).
  • He deserves a raise He completed the project on
    schedule and under budget.
  • Preston slapped his forehead He had forgotten to
    put oregano in the sauce.
  • I need to wake up at 445 tomorrow morning.
  • My favorite painting is named Tilting Knights
    King Richard and Saladin.
  • Dear Mr. Bill Gates
  • I am writing to request you review the business
    proposal included in the following pages..
  • Sincerely,
  • John Doe

31
Week TenSemicolons vs. Colons
  • Correct the following sentences by placing
    semicolons or colons where necessary.
  • Lupe was going to title her essay Mary Had a
    Little Lamb The Social and Personal Benefits of
    Pet Ownership.
  • I made a list so that I would remember everything
    we needed toothpaste, milk, wax paper, and cat
    food.
  • The entrance exam was finished however, I would
    remain nervous until the results came back.
  • The three-person teams will be as follows Takara,
    Lani, and Nick and Jessica, Vince, and Tyrone.
  • Jeremy had this Mark Twain quote taped to his
    folder Man is the only animal that blushes. Or
    needs to.
  • Anne thought she had all the homework she could
    handle on the other hand, she still had two more
    classes in the afternoon.

32
Week TenColons
  • Correct the following sentences by placing
    semicolons or colons where necessary.
  • Lupe was going to title her essay Mary Had a
    Little Lamb The Social and Personal Benefits of
    Pet Ownership.
  • I made a list so that I would remember everything
    we needed toothpaste, milk, wax paper, and cat
    food.
  • The entrance exam was finished however, I would
    remain nervous until the results came back.
  • The three-person teams will be as follows
    Takara, Lani, and Nick and Jessica, Vince, and
    Tyrone.
  • Jeremy had this Mark Twain quote taped to his
    folder Man is the only animal that blushes. Or
    needs to.
  • Anne thought she had all the homework she could
    handle on the other hand, she still had two more
    classes in the afternoon.

33
Week Eleven Clauses
  • A clause is a word group that contains a verb and
    its subject and that is used as a sentence or as
    a part of a sentence.
  • An independent (or main) clause expresses a
    complete thought and can stand by itself as a
    sentence.
  • s v
  • The outsiders missed easy fly balls.
  • s v
  • The outfielders missed easy fly
  • s
  • balls, and the infielders were
  • v
  • throwing wildly.
  • s v
  • The outfielders missed easy fly balls the
  • s v
  • infielders were throwing wildly.
  • A subordinate (or dependent) clause does not
    express a complete thought and cannot stand alone
    as a sentence.
  • whom we spoke to yesterday
  • because no students have applied for them
  • The thought expressed by a subordinate clause
    becomes part of a complete thought when the
    clause is combined with an independent clause.
  • The woman whom we spoke to yesterday told us
    about sources of financial aid for college
    applicants.
  • Some scholarships are still available because no
    students have applied for them.

34
Week ElevenClauses
  • Read the following sentences. Then, identify
    each italicized clause as independent (highlight)
    or subordinate (underline).
  • Whenever I think of Barbara Jordan, I imagine her
    as she looks in a picture taken at my mothers
    graduation in 1986.
  • According to my mother, Jordan spoke elegantly
    about the important values in our society.
  • Of course, her choice of subject matter surprised
    no one since Jordan had long been known as an
    important ethical force in American politics.
  • When Jordan began her public service career in
    1966, she became the first African American woman
    to serve in the Texas legislature.

35
Week Eleven Clauses
  • Read the following sentences. Then, identify
    each italicized clause as independent (highlight)
    or subordinate (underline).
  • Whenever I think of Barbara Jordan, I imagine her
    as she looks in a picture taken at my mothers
    graduation in 1986. (s)
  • According to my mother, Jordan spoke elegantly
    about the important values in our society. (i)
  • Of course, her choice of subject matter surprised
    no one since Jordan had long been known as an
    important ethical force in American politics. (i)
  • When Jordan began her public service career in
    1966, she became the first African American woman
    to serve in the Texas legislature. (s)

36
Week TwelveCompound vs. Complex Clauses
  • A simple sentence contains one independent clause
    and no subordinate clauses.
  • s s v
  • Cora and Kareem bought party
  • supplies at the mall.
  • s v
  • To pass the time, they talked about
  • v
  • school and told stories about their
  • families.
  • A compound sentence contains two or more
    independent clauses and no subordinate clauses.
  • s v
  • Cora hung colorful streamers from the ceiling,
  • s v
  • and Kareem set party favors on the tables.
  • s v s
  • After an hour, they took a short break then they
  • v
  • A complex sentence contains one independent
    clause and at least one subordinate clause.
  • s v s
  • When they had finished their work, they
  • v
  • complimented each other on the results.
  • A compound-complex sentence contains two or more
    independent clauses and at least one subordinate
    clause.
  • s v
  • Cora waited for just the right moment to ask

  • s
  • Kareem to the banquet, and he promptly
  • v
    s
  • accepted her invitation, adding that he had
  • v
  • been planning to ask her.

37
Week TwelveCompound vs. Complex Clauses
  • Classify each of the following sentences as
    simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex.
  • Organizing the rummage sale, the Key Club
    requested donations from everyone at school.
  • The club members accepted whatever was donated,
    but they welcomed housewares most.
  • The principal donated a vacuum cleaner the
    soccer coach contributed a set of dishes and
    several of the teachers provided towel sets.
  • The club sold almost everything that had been
    donated, and the members celebrated their
    success.
  • Afterward, they gave all the profits that they
    had made from the sale to the citys homeless
    shelter.
  • The shelters employees were grateful for the
    donations.

38
Week TwelveCompound vs. Complex Clauses
  • Classify each of the following sentences as
    simple, compound, complex, or compound-complex.
  • Organizing the rummage sale, the Key Club
    requested donations from everyone at school.
    (simple)
  • The club members accepted whatever was donated,
    but they welcomed housewares most.
    (compound-complex)
  • The principal donated a vacuum cleaner the
    soccer coach contributed a set of dishes and
    several of the teachers provided towel sets.
    (compound)
  • The club sold almost everything that had been
    donated, and the members celebrated their
    success. (compound-complex)
  • Afterward, they gave all the profits that they
    had made from the sale to the citys homeless
    shelter. (complex)
  • The shelters employees were grateful for the
    donations. (simple)

39
Week Thirteen Agreement indefinite pronouns
  • Singular indefinite pronouns
  • Anybody, anyone, anything
  • Each, either
  • Everybody, everyone, everything
  • Neither
  • Nobody, no one, nothing, one
  • Somebody, someone and something
  • Other indefinite pronouns that can be singular or
    plural
  • All
  • Any
  • More
  • Most
  • None
  • Some
  • Plural indefinite pronouns
  • Both
  • Few
  • Many
  • Several

40
Week Thirteen Agreement indefinite pronouns
  • Each of the comedians (tries, try) to outdo the
    other.
  • Somebody on the bus (was, were) trying.
  • Neither of these books (has, have) an index.
  • Each of the these pieces of jewelry (has, have)
    too much embellishment.

41
Week Thirteen Agreement indefinite pronouns
  • Each of the comedians (tries, try) to outdo the
    other.
  • Somebody on the bus (was, were) trying.
  • Neither of these books (has, have) an index.
  • Each of the these pieces of jewelry (has, have)
    too much embellishment.

42
Week FourteenAgreement Dont and Doesnt
  • doesnt
  • Contraction of does not.
  • Use doesnt with all singular subjects except the
    pronouns I and you
  • One doesnt give up.
  • Doesnt Donna care that people think she is
    malevolent?
  • dont
  • Contraction of do not
  • Use dont with all plural subjects and with the
    pronouns I and you
  • Apathetic people dont care.
  • Dont these immunizations prevent malaria?

43
Week FourteenAgreement Dont and Doesnt
  • (Doesnt, Dont) several of those in the front
    window cost more than these in the fruit cart?
  • One of the players (doesnt, dont) plan to go.
  • The international childrens chorus is so
    marvelous that their new fans (doesnt, dont)
    want to leave the theatre.
  • Just because you dont like pickles, (doesnt,
    dont) mean you need to say they are malodorous.

44
Week FourteenAgreement Dont and Doesnt
  • (Doesnt, Dont) several of those in the front
    window cost more than these in the fruit cart?
  • One of the players (doesnt, dont) plan to go.
  • The international childrens chorus is so
    marvelous that their new fans (doesnt, dont)
    want to leave the theatre.
  • Just because you dont like pickles, (doesnt,
    dont) mean you need to say they are malodorous.

45
Week FifteenAgreement Collective Nouns
  • When the subject follows the verb, find the
    subject and make sure that the verb agrees with
    it
  • Here is a list including protocol.
  • Here are two lists including protocol
  • Some nouns that are plural in form take singular
    verbs
  • Politics is a controversial topic.
  • The news of the nominee was a surprise.

46
Week FifteenAgreement Collective Nouns
  • The class (has, have) chosen titles for their
    original plays.
  • First prize (was, were) two tickets to Hawaii.
  • Crime and Punishment (is, are) a world famous
    novel with a tormented protagonist.
  • Mathematics (is, are) an important part of many
    everyday activities.
  • Where (is, are) the paragraphs you wrote?

47
Week FifteenAgreement Collective Nouns
  • The class (has, have) chosen titles for their
    original plays.
  • First prize (was, were) two tickets to Hawaii.
  • Crime and Punishment (is, are) a world famous
    novel with a tormented protagonist.
  • Mathematics (is, are) an important part of many
    everyday activities.
  • Where (is, are) the paragraphs you wrote?

48
Week Sixteen Agreement Pronoun/Antecedent
  • A pronoun usually refers to a noun or another
    pronoun that comes before it. The word that a
    pronoun refers to is called its antecedent.
  • A pronoun should agree in number and gender with
    its antecedent
  • Daniel Defoe wrote his first book at the age of
    fifty-nine. (singular)
  • Reliable cards make their owners happy. (plural)
  • The elephant is a long-lived animal. It lives in
    the quietude of Africa. (singular)

49
Week Sixteen Agreement Pronoun/Antecedent
  • Claire or Ida will go to the nursing home early
    so that ___________ can help the residents into
    the lounge.
  • Several of the volunteers contributed _______ own
    money to buy the shelter a new van.
  • As a reward for _______ high grade, either Robert
    or James will get a free lunch.

50
Week Sixteen Agreement Pronoun/Antecedent
  • Claire or Ida will go to the nursing home early
    so that ____she_______ can help the residents
    into the lounge.
  • Several of the volunteers contributed
    __their_____ own money to buy the shelter a new
    van.
  • As a reward for _his____ high grade, either
    Robert or James will get a free lunch.

51
Week SeventeenAgreement Pronoun/Antecedent
  • Collective noun rules apply for pronoun /
    antecedent agreement
  • The pride of lions is hunting its prey on the
    savanna.
  • The pride of lions are licking their chops in
    anticipation.
  • The United States celebrated its bicentennial in
    1976 indubitably one of the most important days
    in our history.

52
Week SeventeenAgreement Pronoun/Antecedent
  • Identify each incorrect pronoun, and write the
    pronoun that agrees with its antecedent.
  • The school finally sent Michael and Kathryn the
    results of the tests he or she had taken.
  • After World War II, the United States gave most
    of their foreign aid to help Europe rebuild.
  • A cheetah is indefatigable on their victim.

53
Week SeventeenAgreement Pronoun/Antecedent
  • Identify each incorrect pronoun, and write the
    pronoun that agrees with its antecedent.
  • The school finally sent Michael and Kathryn the
    results of the tests they had taken.
  • After World War II, the United States gave most
    of its foreign aid to help Europe rebuild.
  • A cheetah is indefatigable on his or her victim.

54
Week Eighteen Semester Review
  • Survey students and use previous assessments to
    determine, by class, which skills need
    reinforcement.
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