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Title: Crime and Early Child Development: What Role Can Cities Play SUMA Youth Crime Workshop September 27


1
Crime and Early Child Development What Role Can
Cities Play?SUMA Youth Crime WorkshopSeptember
27 ReginaSeptember 28 - Saskatoon
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    points entered.
  • Linda L. Nosbush
  • Community Research Coordinator
  • Understanding the Early Years

2
The Virtuous Circle
Crime impacts every portion of this cycle.
Prosperous Society
Social Stability
Innovation and Competitive Workforce
Resources to Fund Programs that Foster Healthy
Child Development
Healthy Children and Adolescents
Healthy Child Development
Doherty Offord
3
The Tipping Point
  • The magic moment when an idea, trend, or social
    behaviour crosses a threshold, tips and spreads
    like wildfire. Three patterns emerge
  • Contagious behaviour
  • Little changes can have big effects
  • Change happens at one dramatic moment and is not
    gradual (geometric rather than linear)
  • We are at that tipping point
  • Invest now and we can create a positive legacy
    for our children
  • Fail to invest now and we will pay now and in
    generations to come

4
Physical Environment
Social Environment
  • Societal relationships and influences
  • Health Care
  • Leisure
  • Family, friends, community
  • Work
  • Childhood experiences environments
  • Natural Environment
  • Built Environment

Wellness
  • Individual behaviours
  • Spiritual well-being
  • Genetic biological characteristics
  • Coping skills
  • Values

The Individual
Saskatchewan Provincial Health Council Determinan
ts of Health 1996
5
CIRCLE OF COURAGE
Generosity
Belonging
Independence
Mastery
Brendtro, Brokenleg VanBockern
6
The Present Picture
7
Drugs and Crime The Prince Albert Scene
  • 70 80 of Crime is Drug related
  • Drugs are the 1 Policing Priority for the Prince
    Albert Police Service
  • How the Cycle works
  • Person becomes addicted
  • Need money for drugs
  • Crime to attain money
  • Break and Enters
  • Prostitution
  • Trafficking
  • Auto Theft

8
Drugs and Crime The Prince Albert Scene
  • Results of Drug Use and Attempts to Attain Money
    to Support Use
  • Increasingly prone to Violence
  • Risky Behaviour leads to HIV/Aids, Hepatitis C,
    (Sharing Needles)
  • 12,000 needles in two drop boxes over a three
    month period
  • More likely to be victimized and assaulted
  • More likely to victimize their peers
  • Job loss
  • Withdrawing from Education and the Social Contact

9
Drugs and Crime The Prince Albert Scene
  • Social Breakdown
  • Children at Risk
  • Children in Protection
  • Child Sexual Exploitation
  • Intergenerational Cycles begins
  • Creates unsafe neighbourhoods and reduces
    perceptions of personal safety
  • Education
  • Less able to concentrate
  • Less able to remember
  • More prone to disengaging
  • Medical Costs Staggering
  • More vulnerable to infection
  • Acute Care Costs
  • Premature Death
  • Society is at risk because needles are disposed
    of indiscriminately

10
Drugs and Crime The Prince Albert Scene
  • Treatment Costs
  • Need to stabilize eating and sleeping habits
    before they can engage with treatment
  • Average 6 8 cycles through treatment
  • Ongoing support needed for years
  • Some of the results of Drug Use particularly
    Crystal Methamphetamine are not reversible
  • First Responders are Increasingly Vulnerable
    (Police, Mobile Crisis, Fire, and Emergency Room
    Personnel)
  • Agitation and Violence
  • Psychosis
  • Meth Houses
  • Trafficking Operations increase Danger

11
The Demographics
  • 62 of PAGCs population is under 25
  • 2001 Census Data suggests that the largest
    portions of Prince Alberts population are 12-20
    years, and 5-12 years
  • It costs over .5 million for every high school
    drop out (Canada will lose more than 4 Billion
    for 137,000 who dropped out in 1989)
  • Its costs over 2 million for every FASD baby
  • It costs .5million for every Young Offender
    under 18 involved with the Justice System
  • One in four of our population is vulnerable

12
The Early Years Data
  • Teen Mother
  • 1 in 6 babies
  • 209 17 infants are born to mothers between 11
    and 19 years of age
  • Infant Mortality
  • 14/1200 Birth Cohort
  • Which is double the Canadian Average, 33 than
    Saskatoon and Region, and triple Moose Jaw
  • Obesity
  • 23 of our Babies are born overweight
  • 276 babies/1200 Birth Cohort born over 8.8 pounds

13
The Early Years
  • Economic Conditions - Half our families lives in
    low to very low Socio Economic Conditions
  • One in four families lives below the LICO
  • Welfare Support payments are 60 of LICO in
    Canada
  • Prenatal Care - 21 of children have less than
    adequate prenatal care
  • 253 infants/1200 Birth Cohort in Prince Albert
  • Mobility - 81 of families live in neighbourhoods
    where between 10 - 60 of them move every single
    year
  • This year Queen Mary Community School has 125
    turn around in its school population by Easter of
    the school year

14
How Do We Change This Picture?
  • What does this mean about our society, our
    cities, our neighbourhoods?
  • Where is causing this?
  • Why do we see such escalation?
  • Where do we intervene strategically to have the
    largest impact?
  • How do we structure ourselves to make the
    necessary impact?
  • How do we know if were having an impact?

15
Creating a Positive Context for Human Development
  • We need to create the context that nurtures and
    supports
  • If we do this well, we will spend less time,
    effort and money, fixing up when things go wrong
  • Enables us to build on strength and create
    capacity
  • Monitoring is important we need to be aware of
    where weve been and where were going

16
We Need to Understand.
  • Our Demographics
  • Human Development
  • Our Present Capacity
  • Strengths
  • Challenges
  • Needs
  • Opportunities
  • Resources
  • How These Patterns Get Created and are Sustained
  • What the Research Has Shown Us

17
(No Transcript)
18
Supportive Housing Project
- Nanaimo Affordable Housing Society, 2002
Study of 17 tenants
  • Before Moving into the Building
  • 63 medical admissions
  • Resulting in 703 hospital days
  • 31 psychiatric admissions
  • Resulting in 729 hospital days
  • After Moving Into the Building
  • 10 medical admissions
  • Resulting in 54 hospital days
  • Reduced hospital stays by 92.6
  • 10 psychiatric admissions
  • Resulting in 82 days
  • Reduced hospital stays by 88.8

Stable housing has a profound effect on health
and well-being and on associated health care
costs.
19
Brains Wiring and Development
1 3 10 60 80
Conception
20
If we have only one start in life Let it be a
strong one!
21
Strong Start
  • Sensitive Start
  • Relationship positive, enduring reciprocal
  • Safe Start
  • Absence of neglect, abuse
  • Protection from drugs, alcohol, tobacco
  • Healthy Start
  • Nourishment
  • Food Security
  • Immunization
  • Smart Start
  • Sensory Stimulation
  • Windows of Opportunity
  • Connected Start
  • Community
  • Formal Informal Supports
  • Home Place or Heartland
  • First source of social support
  • Bridgeline (first line of protection to create
    optimal outcomes)
  • Housing
  • Income
  • Workplace

22
The First Six Years are Pivotal to Childrens
Ability
  • To Learn
  • To Create
  • To Love
  • To Trust
  • To develop a strong Sense of Themselves
  • Invest in Kids

23
Building A Framework for Understanding
  • We are responsible for
  • Opening doors
  • Ensuring that these doors stay open
  • Helping children to walk through these doors
  • Being a role model for children
  • Helping children to develop a sense of a
    brighter future

24
What We Do or Fail to Do
  • Will Shape childrens future
  • Will Influence how their brains are wired
  • Will set a Pattern for our nations future
  • Will profoundly affect the quality of life we
    will have

25
Community Influences on Child Development
26
Prince Alberts Social Index Challenges Faced
By Neighbourhoods
27
Many Factors Combine to Create both Opportunities
and Challenges in Neighbourhoods
28
The Distant Early Warning SystemThe Early
Development Instrument
  • Indicates how well development has proceeded in
    the first six years of life in five domains
  • Physical Health and Well-Being
  • Social Competence
  • Emotional Maturity
  • Language and Cognitive Development
  • Communication Skills and General Knowledge
  • Available at the community and neighbourhood
    level
  • Two types of Analysis
  • Prospective Analysis These are our children,
    how can we support their future development?
  • Helps to construct support systems for the
    present age cohort
  • Retrospective Analysis How can we change things
    so that future age cohorts develop more
    positively?
  • Helps to change the playing field for all
    subsequent age cohorts

29
Childrens Readiness to Learn at School 2004
30
How Many Children Lack Readiness to Learn?
31
Physical Health and Well-Being(145 children with
one or more of the factors)
32
Physical Health and Well-BeingGross and Fine
Motor Skills Subscale
  • Fine and Gross Motor Skills
  • Overall Energy Levels
  • Physical Skills
  • This suggests that children will
  • Be less well coordinated
  • Lack agility
  • Will find writing and the other fine motor
    requirements of school difficult
  • Have reduced energy levels
  • Find most physical tasks taxing

33
Social Competence(169 with one or more of the
factors)
34
Social CompetenceOverall Social Competence
Subscale
  • Social Skills
  • Self-confidence
  • Ability to play with children
  • Capacity to interact cooperatively
  • This suggests that children will have difficulty
  • Interacting with both children and adults in both
    play and work situations
  • Difficulty negotiating social situations because
    they lack both the social skill and the confidence

35
Emotional Maturity(160 children with one or more
of the factors)
36
Emotional MaturityProsocial Helping Behaviour
  • Almost never show any of the helping behaviours
  • Do not help someone who is hurt, sick or upset
  • Do not spontaneously offer to help
  • Do not invite bystanders to join in
  • Children will experience difficulty because
  • They lack empathy for the other
  • They are not viewed as recognizing
  • or be supportive of the groups needs

37
Emotional MaturityAggressive Behaviour Subscale
  • Demonstrate most of aggressive behaviours
  • Get into physical fights
  • Kick or bit others
  • Take other peoples things
  • Are disobedient
  • Have temper tantrums
  • When children are aggressive others
  • Fear them and avoid them
  • Do not readily seek them out and include them in
    groups

38
Emotional MaturityHyperactivity Inattention
  • Demonstrate most of the hyperactive behaviours
  • Restless
  • Distractible
  • Impulsive
  • Fidget
  • Experience difficulty
  • settling into activities
  • These children experience difficulty sustaining
    their focus and frequently act first and think
    later.

39
Language Cognitive Development(180 children
with one or more of the factors)
40
Language Cognitive DevelopmentLiteracy and
Numeracy Skills
  • Children in this area demonstrated marked
    difficulties in all subscales indicating
  • Lack of basic literacy skills including rhyming,
    directionality, writing their own name and other
    simple words, letter recognition, and
    sound-symbol knowledge
  • Lacking interesting in books, reading, number
    games as well as difficulty remembering things
  • Children who lack counting ability, shapes, time
    concepts, and numbers
  • These children will experience difficulty with
    academic tasks requiring literacy and numeracy
    skills as well as those that require memory skills

41
Communication Skills General Knowledge(161
children)
42
Communication Skills General Knowledge
  • There was only a general factor for this scale
    and it demonstrated that children in this area
    have difficulty with
  • Communication skills
  • Language activities
  • Understanding as well as being understood by
    others
  • General knowledge and mastery of their first
    language

43
Readiness to Learn Factors2004(Age cohort of
642 Kindergarten Children)
44
What do these results suggest as a Distant Early
Warning System?
  • At a systemic level it strongly suggests that the
    root cause lies in attachment. The developmental
    literature suggests that when children have safe,
    secure attachments with their primary caregivers
    that are positive, enduring, and reciprocal they
    have a base of trust and security from which they
    can reach out and explore their world. When they
    are able to do this they develop
  • Gross and fine motor skills,
  • Prosocial skills,
  • Empathy,
  • Ability to focus their attention
  • Cognitive skills
  • General Knowledge
  • Communication skills

45
We Live, Love, Learn and Discover our
Human-Being In the Shelter of Each Other
  • Action has meaning only in relationship and
    without understanding relationship action on any
    level will only breed conflict (Krishnamurti).
  • So often we focus on what we should do instead
    we need to focus on what we should be for our
    children (Neufeld Maté)
  • Relationship is a two-way connection for it to
    facilitate development it must be
  • Positive
  • Enduring
  • Reciprocal

46
Childrens Developmental Destiny
  • Self-regulated
  • Self-motivated
  • Mature
  • Conscious of their own self-worth
  • Mindful of feelings,rights, dignity of others
  • However, only the attachment relationship can
    provide the proper context for child rearing.
    The secret of parenting is not what the parent
    does for the child but who the parent is for the
    child. When this is firmly established, the
    attachment relationship functions like the
    psychological umbilical cord and becomes the
    secure base from which the child develops trust,
    defines and integrates who they are, and ventures
    forth in the world and learns to function in it
    socially, emotionally, physically and cognitively.

Based on Neufeld Maté, 2004
47
Weve Come Undone
  • In periods of rapid change, groups must
    reconstitute who they are and how they function
    but it takes 100 years to create a working
    culture
  • The type of society that supports the
    developmental needs of young human beings is
    vanishing. The cause is not individual parental
    failure but an unprecedented cultural breakdown
    for which our instincts cannot adequately
    compensate. Children need stability, presence,
    attention, advice, good psychic food, and
    unpolluted stories (Bly).

48
How does this Happen and Why?
  • Mobility interrupts cultural continuity
    incessant transplanting results in
  • Children growing up peer rich and adult poor
  • Loss of Extended Family who provide unconditional
    acceptance
  • The Nuclear Family is under extreme pressure
  • Divorce Rates
  • Competing Attachments
  • Secularization of Society spiritual communities
    provide an important supporting cast for parents
    and an attachment village for children which grow
    out of secure, primary attachments
  • Recreation and many other activities for peer
    group thereby distancing intergenerational
    contact and support
  • Immigration
  • Powerful economic dynamics
  • Two parents working
  • Loss of the family meal
  • Culture is eroded in its capacity to
  • Evolve customs and rituals that serve attachment
    needs
  • Games are an instrument of culture

49
What is the Effect?
  • Attachment Voids are created situations where
    the childs natural attachments are missing, and
    they are dangerous precisely because they are so
    indiscriminate
  • Children hunger for relief from attachment void.
    Attachment instinct is blind to such factors as
  • Dependability,
  • Responsibility,
  • Security,
  • Maturity, and
  • Nurturance.
  • The likelihood of an attachment becoming an
    affair is much greater when it is born of a
    void instead of an existing attachment.
  • Peer attachments are safest when they are the
    natural offspring of attachments with parents.
    Frequently, they are born of disconnection rather
    than connection. Then, attachment
    incompatibility results and the child must choose
    one or the other
  • If we do not recognize what binds us together, we
    cannot understand what tears us asunder.

50
Attachment
  • The pursuit and preservation of proximity, of
    closeness and connection biologically,
    physically, behaviorally, emotionally and
    psychologically.
  • Orchestrates the instincts of the parent as well
    as the child.
  • When our attachments are out of order, our
    instincts will be too
  • For parents to apply this knowledge properly,
    they must become conscious from within. The two
    ways of knowing
  • Knowing About
  • Experiencing Intimately
  • must come together

51
Orienting
  • The Orienting Instinct is basic and it involves
    locating oneself in space and time. The need is
    both physical and psychological and involves
    having a sense of who we are, what is real, why
    things happen, what is good, what things mean.
    To fail to orient is to suffer disorientation.
  • To find nothing, or no one to orient by, is
    absolutely intolerable to the human brain. We
    become like lost souls, cut adrift, wandering
    aimlessly.
  • The attachment figure operates as a compass
    point, an orienting focal point.

52
When Peers Become the Compass
  • They dictate
  • How to act
  • What to wear
  • How to look
  • What to say
  • What to do
  • Arbiters of what is good and what is bad
  • What is happening
  • How to separate reality from fantasy
  • What is important
  • What works and what doesnt work
  • How the child defines who he or she is
  • Because the child is not yet capable of
    self-orienting

53
Six Ways of Attaching
  • Senses physical proximity
  • Sameness attempting to form the same type of
    existence or expression by imitation and
    emulation
  • Belonging and Loyalty to claim as ones own and
    then to be faithful and obedient to those one is
    attached to
  • Significance feel that you matter to somebody
    please and want to win approval
  • Feeling pursuit of emotional intimacy
  • Being Known a psychological closeness defining
    by the secrets that are shared sharing deepest
    concerns and insecurities about self

54
What Happens When There is an Attachment Void?
  • Vulnerability to Gangs
  • Violence and aggression
  • Bullying
  • Suicide
  • Adolescents failing to mature
  • Desensitizing
  • Insolence and Defiance increasing
  • Substance Abuse
  • Addictions to a range of things like video games,
    internet
  • Poor prosocial skills
  • Horizontal rather than Vertical transmission of
    Culture Peers replacing parents
  • ALIENATION

55
Types of Attachment
  • Secure
  • Insecure - avoidant
  • Insecure - anxious/ambivalent
  • Insecure - Disorganized

56
Secure Attachments45 75Im worthy of love
and affection.
  • Occur when a child has
  • consistent,
  • emotionally attuned,
  • contingent communication
  • with their primary caregiver.
  • Relationships that provide this type of
    responsiveness, especially at times of emotional
    need offer children repeated experiences of
    feeling
  • connected,
  • understood and
  • protected.

57
Insecure Attachment Avoidant20 30Im not
worthy of love and affection.
  • Parent is repeatedly unavailable, imperceptive,
    unresponsive, and emotionally rejecting of the
    child
  • Child adapts by
  • Avoiding closeness and emotional connection with
    the child
  • Have an emotionally barren quality in the tone of
    their communication
  • Cool as a cucumber
  • Most physiologically distressed even though they
    dont show it.

58
Insecure Attachment Anxious/Ambivalent5
15I want to please, yet I can never please.
  • Parent is inconsistently available, perceptive
    and responsive and intrusive
  • Please me guilt trip and criticism
  • Child will overplay distress to get some
    reaction from the parent
  • Very high for disadvantaged children
  • In preschool they bully and are bullied
  • As adults, these women are often abused

59
Insecure Attachment Disorganized/Disorientedfig
ures vary from 8 to 20-40
  • Frightened, frightening, disorienting, alarming
  • No coherent strategy for dealing with stress
  • Worst for aggression against self,others, animals
  • Social Incompetence
  • Dont blame the parents theyve been
    traumatized
  • In parentally maltreated infants up to 80 of
    attachments are of this type

60
Understanding the Early Years Community Survey
National Longitudinal Survey of Children and
Youth
  • Positive Parenting
  • Parental Engagement
  • Family Functioning
  • Maternal Mental Health
  • Social Support
  • Social Capital
  • Neighbourhood Quality
  • Neighbourhood Safety
  • Use of Resources
  • Residential Stability

Factors that Influence Childrens Development
Prince Albert and Area Scored at or above the
National Average
61
Criminogenic Factors
  • Criminal History
  • Antisocial Attitudes Procriminal attitudes
    that are accepting of crime and reject
    conventional values
  • Antisocial Pattern Early anti-social and
    deviant behaviour (frequently observable by five)
    which is frequently exemplified by significant
    problems in school
  • Antisocial Companions Criminal associates who
    are sources of interpersonal rewards for deviant
    behaviour and costs for criminal behaviour
  • Unstable Employment and Low Level of Education
  • Little participation in Leisure or Recreational
    Activities
  • History of Substance Abuse
  • Disrupted Family Circumstances

Big Four Criminogenic Factors
62
We Learn Not to Aggress
Richard Tremblay, 2003, Why Socialization Fails
The Case of Chronic Physical Aggression. In
Causes of Conduct Disorder and Juvenile
Delinquency. B. Lahey, T. Moffitt, A. Caspi,
Eds. The Guildford Press.  
63
Positive Social Environments Protect
64
(No Transcript)
65
A Preliminary Model of Asset-Based Community
Capacity Building
Benson, P. L., Roehlkepartain, E. D., Sesma,
A., J. (2004, March). Tapping the power of
community The potential of asset building to
strengthen substance abuse prevention efforts.
Search Institute Insights Evidence 2 (1).
66
Building Blocks for Community Asset
BuildingJohn McKnight 2004
  • Local Residents committed to community,
    capacity to come together around common issues
    conviction that if individuals are looked after
    the community will be strong
  • Associations groups of local residents who come
    together to do work for which they are not paid
  • Institutions groups of people who come together
    for work for which they are paid
  • Environment buildings, space, land, and the
    social environment
  • Economy a process for exchanging good and
    services

67
Associations
  • Circular organization because they come together
    by choice
  • Cannot be replaced by Institutions
  • Decisions by consensus
  • Goal is to provide a site of care
  • Capacity to mobilize gifts within a community
  • Principle agents of support and problem-solving
  • Create citizens who are the most powerful ones
    in a democracy
  • Three types
  • Formal Associations Have officers that are
    elected, e.g., Big Brothers and Big Sisters
  • Less Formal Associations Solve problems,
    celebrate and enjoy their social compact, site
    for critical dialogue and decision making, e.g.,
    block of neighbours, a cooking or poker club
  • Associational Activity that occurs as an
    Enterprise or Business People gather for
    interaction as well as transaction, e.g., grocery
    store, beauty parlor, barber shop, hardware store

68
Individual Asset BuildingSearch Institute,
Minneapolis
  • Forty scientifically based experiences,
    relationship, opportunities, skills and character
    traits that form a foundation for healthy
    development that unleash public commitment,
    passion, and capacity (Search Institute)
  • External Assets are nurtured by the community and
    received by children from the people and
    institutions in their lives
  • Support
  • Empowerment
  • Boundaries and Expectations
  • Constructive Use of Time
  • Internal Assets also require the commitment of
    the community but constitute the internal
    qualities that guide positive choices and foster
    a sense of confidence, passion and purpose
  • Commitment to Learning
  • Positive Values
  • Social Competencies
  • Positive Identity

69
More Assets Increase Positive Outcomes
Fewer Assets Increase Negative Outcomes
70
Four Targets for Asset-Building Communities
  • Vertical Accumulation Ensures that young people
    experience an increasing number of assets in
    their lives
  • Horizontal Accumulation Ensures that young
    people experience these resources or assets in
    multiple contexts so theyre reinforced
  • Chronological Accumulation Asset-building
    experiences are renewed and reinforced across
    time
  • Developmental Breadth Ensures the reach of
    asset-building energy reaches all children, not
    just those at risk
  • The assets (external and internal) can function
    as a powerful blueprint for nurturing positive
    development

71
Adults are Called to Action
Stuart and Bostrom, 2003            A
Adversity provides a catalyst for a childs
character growth and is essential to success T
A Trusting Relationship with a caring adult
helps a child interpret adversity and develop
promise character

72
Signs of Hope and Positive Directionin Prince
Albert and Area
  • Citys Strategic Planning Changing the Way We
    do Business ( Alignment of Assets Strategic
    Alliances) Economic Development (Downtown
    Revitalization) Social Issues (Social Policy
    Coordination Allocation of Resources Based on
    Community Needs), Riverbank, Safety
  • Citys After School and Playground Programs
  • Forestry Centre and Mall Development will
    stimulate economy
  • Prince Albert Police Services Foot Patrol as
    well as placement of an Officer at Carlton
    Comprehensive High School
  • Food Charter and work with Food Security
  • Development of a Crime Reduction Strategy
  • Reorganization at City Hall

73
Signs of Hope and Positive Directionin Prince
Albert and Area
  • The continued work of the multisectoral and
    multidisciplinary Regional Intersectoral
    Committee whose function is to address complex
    issues that require the expertise and resources
    of more than one sector
  • Formation of The Dirty Dozen to address the
    issue that most compromises the developmental
    health and well-being of the areas children and
    youth
  • Media Awareness on Substance Abuse
  • Prince Albert Integrated Human Services
    Practicum
  • Work toward helping Prince Albert become a SAFE
    Community
  • Collaboration between and among government
    sectors, community-based organizations and the
    Civic Government to build a brighter future for
    all our citizens

74
03-063
HEALTH
75
04-006
Swedish Longitudinal Study ECD and Adult Health
Number of Adverse ECD Circumstances
1
2
4
0
3
Adult Health
Odds - Ratios
General Physical
1
1.39
1.54
2.08
2.66
1
1.56
1.53
2.91
7.76
Circulatory
Mental
1
1.78
2.05
3.76
10.27
Economic, family size, broken family and family
dissention
Lundberg, Soc. Sci. Med, Vol. 36, No. 8, 1993
76
03-065
BEHAVIOUR
77
04-126
Physical Aggression Trajectories
4
Chronic (4)
High (28)
Physical Aggression
2
Moderate (53)
Low (14)
0
6
10
11
12
13
14
15
Age
Nagin Tremblay. 1999.
78
04-127
High School Diploma
80
75.8
62.5
60

40
27.5
20
3.3
0
Never
Low
High
Chronic
Level of Aggression
Tremblay
79
02-008
Maltreatment at an early age can
have enduring negative effects on
a child's brain development and
function.
Martin Teicher
Scientific American, 2002
80
02-011
"The aftermath can appear as
depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts or
post-traumatic stress - or as aggression,
impulsiveness, delinquency, hyperactivity
or substance abuse."
Martin Teicher
Scientific American, 2002
81
02-041
Substance Abuse and Childhood Abuse
Odds Ratios for Drug
and Alcohol Use
Exposure to
Drugs
Alcohol
Child Abuse

0 1.0 1.0
1 2.7 2.0
2 2.9 4.0
3 3.6 4.9

4 4.7 7.4
Scale 0 none

4 intense
82
03-115
LITERACY
83
05-168
two American public hospitals found that a
third of patients could not read and understand
basic health-related materials, 42 could not
understand directions for taking medication on an
empty stomach, and 60 could not understand a
standard consent form.
The Lancet, 366, p. 95
84
05-173
Literacy Levels by Physical, Mental or Other
Health Conditions USA (Quantitative)
Health Problems
Mental or Emotional Problems
Long-term Illness
Percent
Level
NALS, p. 44, 2002
85
05-170
Percentages of Adults in Poverty, by Literacy
Level USA (Prose)
Level
Percent
NALS, p. 61, 2002
86
03-116
OUTCOME MEASURES
87
05-192
Life Expectancy at Birth, Registered Indian and
Canadian Populations - Males (1980-2000)
Registered Indians
All Canadians
Age (Years)
Population Projections for Canada, Stats Can.,
2001.
Year
88
02-056
Policies to Foster Human Capital
"We cannot afford to postpone investing in
children until they become adults nor can we
wait until they reach school - a time when it
may be too late to intervene."
Heckman, J., 2001
(Nobel Prize Economics, 2000)
89
03-074
Rates of Return to Human Development Investment
Across all Ages
8
Pre-school Programs (ROI 18 without health
with health 116)
6
Return Per Invested
School (ROI 13)
4
R
Job Training
2
Pre- School
School
Post School
0
6
18
Age
Carneiro, Heckman, Human Capital Policy, 2003
90
00-068
Integrated - ECD
Social
Equality
Education
Health
Capital
Economic
Growth
Human Development
91
Our ModelStrong Children grow up in Strong
Families, Strong Neighbourhoods, Strong Peer
Groups, and Strong Nations
Vision Leadership Structural Change
  • Four Worlds of Childhood(SchoolPLUS)
  • Family
  • Peer Group
  • School
  • Neighbourhood and Community

Acute Care
Education and Awareness
92
Breaking the Cycle A Balanced Approach
  • Identify the root causes
  • Problem solve common issues
  • Move toward early identification
  • Intervention
  • Acute Services
  • Collaborate to create joint solutions
  • Communication Strategy
  • Engaging the stakeholders
  • Respectful way of sharing information
  • Engaging the whole community

Increasingly more expensive but easier to measure
93
The Virtuous Circle
Prosperous Society
Social Stability
Innovation and Competitive Workforce
Resources to Fund Programs that Foster Healthy
Child Development
Healthy Children and Adolescents
Healthy Child Development
Doherty Offord
94
By looking after our children and keeping them
healthy and safe we are ensuring a brighter
future for ourselves.
- Constable Gwen Kennedy, Prince Albert Police
Service
95
Silos need to be replaced by bridges between
community, stakeholders and individuals in order
to move toward collective understanding and
ownership of issues. For, alone we go fast and
together we go far! - Dale McFee, Chief of
Prince Albert Police Service
96
I challenge you to look into the eyes of our
children and tell yourself that child abuse is
someone elses problem. - Sergeant Gordon
Beuckert, Prince Albert Police Service
97
Children are 30 of our population but 100 of
our future..  - Inspector Troy CooperPrince
Albert Police Service
98
Family Enabling Society






.

man Capital based on
Program Evaluation, Monitoring,
Social Inclusion
long learning
Collaboration
And Research
-
life
Hu
Four Corner Posts

Doug Willms, NLSCY 2002
99
The Path of Life Unwinding
100
Every Life Has Stormy Weather
101
But There is Always Hope
102
Our Children Trust Us to Build A Future Worth
Living
103
They Have Hope in Us
As
We Have Hope in Them
104
They Live On the Edge of Possibility
105
Will We Help Them Sow Solid Dreams for the
Future?
Dreams that Help Them Realize Their Promise
106
Together We Can Plant Hope!
Alone we go fast, Together we go far.
We can build a future that
Will shine for eternity!
107
We live, love, learn, and develop our human-being
in the shelter of each other.
Can we each go forth to make Saskatchewan a place
where all can, not only survive, but thrive?
108
How will Saskatchewan grow his future? The choice
is.ours!
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