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Keeping Children Safe

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We remove children from their homes when they are not safe. ... Sexual intercourse or sexual contact (under age 18) Sexual exploitation of a child ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Keeping Children Safe


1
(No Transcript)
2
BMCW Mission Statement
  • The mission of the Bureau of Milwaukee Child
    Welfare is to promote the best interest of
    children by supporting and encouraging families
    efforts to resolve problems that threaten the
    safety of their children. We remove children from
    their homes when they are not safe. When children
    cannot be reunited with their families, we will
    provide suitable alternatives in permanent,
    stable, and nurturing homes.

3
BMCW responsibilities
  • Assure the safety of children as defined by law
  • Minimize intrusion into private family life
  • Maintain families and family connections whenever
    possible

4
BMCW responsibilities
  • Respect the legal rights of parents
  • Support the best interests of children

5
CPS steps in when the parent cannot or will not
protect
  • BMCW relies on the community to help us protect
    children
  • Reports phoned into 220-SAFE
  • Community reporters
  • Mandated reporters

6
Children are safe when
  • They are not exposed to any dangers.
  • OR
  • Even if there are dangers to them, their parents
    or caregivers protect them from those dangers.

7
Caregiver Protective Capacity
  • It is the parents job to protect the child.
  • It is the CPS professionals job to
  • Identify protective capacities of parents
  • Voice them
  • Build on existing protective capacities

8
Definitions of Child Maltreatment
  • An Abused or Neglected Child
  • A child whose physical or mental health is harmed
    or threatened with harm by the acts or omissions
    of the person responsible for his/her welfare

9
Types of Maltreatment
  • Physical
  • Emotional
  • Sexual
  • Neglect

10
Physical maltreatment
  • Physical injury inflicted on a child by other
    than accidental means. s. 48.02(1)(a)
  • Physical injury includes but is not limited to
    lacerations, fractured bones, burns, internal
    injuries, severe or frequent bruising or great
    bodily harm as defined under s.939.22(14). s.
    48.02(14g)

11
Inflicted vs. Accidental Injury
  • Location, shape, and appearance of injury
  • History of how the injury occurred and logical
    validity
  • Chronicity, multiplicity of injury, including
    different stages of healing

12
Suspicious Caretaker Explanation
  • Gives partial report
  • Blames other parent or other child
  • Denies even blatant injury
  • Explanation is implausible or inconsistent
  • May delay seeking medical care

13
Emotional Abuse
  • Severe harm to childs psychological or
    intellectual functioning
  • Anxiety
  • Depression and/or withdrawal
  • Outward aggressive behavior

14
Sexual Abuse
  • Sexual intercourse or sexual contact (under age
    18)
  • Sexual exploitation of a child
  • Permitting, allowing or encouraging a child to
    engage in prostitution
  • Intentionally causing a child to view or listen
    to sexually explicit conduct for the purpose of
    sexually arousing or gratifying the actor or
    humiliating or degrading the child
  • Exposing genitals or pubic area to a child or
    causing a child to expose genital or pubic areas
    for the purpose of sexual arousal or sexual
    gratification

15
Neglect
  • Lack physical care/ poor hygiene
  • Inadequately clothed
  • Emotional neglect
  • Abandoned
  • Malnourished and/or dehydrated
  • Lacking medical care
  • Dangerous physical environment
  • Left unsupervised

16
Factors that Confound a Determination of Neglect
  • Differences in values, norms and standards of
    acceptance
  • Marginal child rearing
  • POVERTY

17
What happens after a call is received?

18
Tips for Making A Report
  • Please refer to handout
  • You will be asked questions by the social worker
  • You may report anonymously
  • Report to 220-SAFE

19
Step 1 Access
  • Calls are answered by state-employed social
    workers
  • Access social workers gather information from
    callers

20
Access (continued)
  • WI safety intervention standards are used to
    identify families that require a Child Protective
    Service (CPS) response (screen in)
  • Determine urgency of the response time
  • Refer to region office for assignment to Initial
    Assessment unit for assessment

21
Response to Reporter
  • All reporters should be contacted during
    investigation on calls screened in.
  • Mandated reporters
  • Are contacted at receipt of report
  • Receive written notice if report is screened
    out/no investigation
  • Receive written notice of results of
    investigation

22
Step 2 Initial Assessment
  • State-employed, state certified Initial
    Assessment Social Workers respond to reports
    screened in by Access
  • Respond by assessing the safety of children in
    the home and protective capacity of parents.
  • Identify present and impending danger threats

23
Initial Assessment (continued)
  • Take action to control circumstances jeopardizing
    child safety
  • Determine the minimum level of intervention
    necessary to control for safety
  • Determine if maltreatment did or did not occur
    (substantiation)

24
Initial Assessment (continued)
  • Support parents in providing protection and care
    for their children when someone outside the
    family maltreats them
  • Collaborate with law enforcement, medical staff,
    court system, domestic violence prevention
    services, and other systems
  • Determine if family needs assistance from
    community resources

25
Initial Assessment (continued)
  • Investigation
  • According to state standards and BMCW protocol
  • Interview child
  • Interview both maltreating and non-maltreating
    parent
  • May involve collateral contacts
  • Involves interview of reporter
  • Must be completed within 60 days

26
Initial Assessment (continued)
  • Decision making
  • A child is unsafe now Present Danger Threats
  • Childs safety cannot be assured for the
    foreseeable future Impending Danger Threat

27
When there is present danger, the CPS
professional will take action!

27
28
Examples of Protective Plans
  • Move responsible adult into the home.
  • Move child in with a responsible adult.
  • Make maltreater leave home. (Provided
    non-maltreating caregiver has strong protective
    capacities.)
  • Take child into temporary physical custody.
  • Bring Safety Services into the home.

28
29
Assessing Impending Danger Threats
  • Requires more information about the family
  • More sophisticated safety decision- making tools
  • Consider
  • Protective capacity of non-maltreating parent
  • Past history, if any
  • Parents ability to handle difficult situation or
    challenging needs of child

29
30
Results of IA
  • Child is unsafe
  • Provide a Protective Plan
  • Provide in-home services
  • Remove the child, begin CHIPS process
  • Child is safe but there are risks and the family
    wants services
  • Child is safe. No safety factors exist. Family
    does not want services. Close case.

31
I called and nothing was done.
  • Report did not meet statutory definition of CAN.
    Call was screened out.
  • Investigation showed child was safe, no
    maltreatment occurred, family did not need
    services.
  • Services are being provided while child remains
    in the home. This is confidential, so the
    reporter may not know of services.

32
Safety Services
  • In-home services to ensure safety
  • The child is unsafe, but there is sufficient
    caregiver protective capacity
  • Child is safe, but risks are identified
  • No CHIPS court order
  • New legislation can bring in court involvement as
    needed

33
Safety Services (continued)
  • Provider network has array of services
  • Family identifies change, Safety Service manager
    monitors change

34
Safety Services (continued)
  • May revert to court if family does not cooperate
  • Refer to community resources before closing case

35
Ongoing Case Management Services
  • Manage child safety (in-home out-of-home)
  • Establish relationship with family that supports
    the change process
  • Family assessment and case planning
  • Plan for and achieve a permanent, safe family for
    each child in care

36
On-going Case Management Services (continued)
  • Track medical care and compliance
  • Manage the court process
  • Assist parent in meeting court requirements
  • Ensure services to child
  • Plan for permanency of the child either in
    reunification or adoption

37
On-going Case Management Services (continued)
  • Facilitate permanency for child
  • Help parent understand concept of permanence
  • Concurrent planning ensures options to
    reunification are identified early
  • Adoption
  • Transfer of guardianship

38
On-going Case Management Services (continued)
  • Transition family to informal or community
    services

39
Out-of-Home Care
  • Removing a child from his/her home is always
    traumatic
  • Least restrictive environment
  • Includes
  • Relative caregiver
  • Family foster home
  • Group home/setting
  • Treatment foster home
  • Residential care facility

40
Out-of-Home Care
  • Temporary placements should enhance the
    likelihood of reunification, when appropriate.
  • If permanency plan changes to adoption, foster
    parent may become adoptive resource.
  • Foster care cannot be considered permanent under
    most circumstances.

41
Out-of-Home Care
  • Foster and adoptive family recruitment call
    264-KIDS
  • Licensing/home study
  • Placement, matching, and support

42
Permanency Planning
  • All children have a right and need to live and
    develop within safe, secure, and permanent
    families.
  • When a child cannot be placed with relatives,
    placement is preferred within the childs
    neighborhood or community.

43
Adoption
  • Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997
  • Sets guidelines for termination of parental
    rights
  • 85 of adopted children in Milwaukee County are
    adopted by their foster parents.

44
Other Partners
  • Family Intervention and Support Services
  • Kinship Care
  • Independent Living
  • Independent Investigations

45
Other Partners
  • Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership for
    Professional Development Helen Bader School of
    Social Welfare- UWM
  • Trains staff and foster/adoptive parents
  • Milwaukee Office of Ombudsman for Child Welfare
  • Independent oversight

46
Milwaukee Child Welfare Partnership Council
  • Advisory council appointed by the governor
  • Associate members of community stakeholders

47
Our Greatest Partner
  • You
  • Everyone has a role in providing for the safety
    and well-being of our communitys children.
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