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March 5th, 2007

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Title: March 5th, 2007


1
Transportation Planning and Traffic Calming- Part
1
March 5th, 2007
Christine Nolan (Introductions) Presenters
Prof. Jon D. Fricker Indraneel Kumar Jamie
Palmer Kent Anderson John Myers
2
An introduction to transportation planning
  • Prof. Jon D. Fricker
  • School of Civil Engineering Purdue University
  • 5 March 2007

3
Questions about Transportation Planning
  • What is transportation planning?
  • What are the different modes of tp.?
  • What is multimodal tp. planning?
  • Principles of tp. planning?

4
My credentials
  • Purdue faculty member (CE) since 1980
  • Teach courses in Tp. Planning, Urban Planning,
    and Public Mass Tp.
  • Research on Tp. Planning (PUCFMMES)
  • Member of TRB Committees on Tp. Planning
  • Chair, Technical Tp. Committee
  • Not a practicing Tp. Planner

5
What is transportation planning?
  • Generates info that is useful to decision-makers

6
Elements of Tp. Planning
  • Land use ? travel patterns
  • Travel forecasting for specified cases
  • Objectives
  • Scenarios

7
Steps in Tp. Planning Process
  • Needs analysis, visioning process
  • Socio-economic data
  • Tp. network representation
  • Travel demand model (next slides)
  • Analysis of alternatives
  • Decisions on projects
  • Tp. Improvement Program

8
1. Trip Generation
  • How many trips
  • are made
  • From home ?
  • (cross-classification)
  • To other locations
  • (regression equations)
  • HBW attractions 1.45 Total Employment

9
2. Trip Distribution
  • Connecting trip origins and destinations
  • Choice of destination D depends on
  • number of trip ends at D
  • Distance to D
  • TAZ1 TAZ2
  • TAZ3 TAZ4

10
3. Mode Choice
  • Measure attributes of modes. (next slide)
  • Convert to utility.
  • Compute mode shares.

11
Modes of Transportation
  • Modal analysis depends on the reason for the
    study.
  • Private autos and transit
  • Passengers and freight
  • Drive-alone auto vs. shared ride
  • Bus and rail transit, newer alternatives

12
4. Trip Assignment
  • Route taken by each trip
  • Roadways
  • Transit routes
  • Minimize travel time?

13
5. Evaluate alternatives
  • For each alt.,
  • Calc. Benefits
  • VMT, VHT
  • Average Travel Speed, Delay
  • Travel Cost
  • Crashes
  • Compare with costs

14
What is multimodal transportation planning?
  • Coordinate
  • Complement

15
Principles of Transportation Planning
  • Avoid sprawl.
  • Context-Sensitive Design
  • Environmental Justice
  • Improve quality of life.
  • Maximize transportation choices.
  • Sustainability

16
Principles for Transportation Planner
  • Acquire best data available.
  • Make assumptions with integrity. Document them
  • Use appropriate models and methods. Document
    them.
  • Do sensitivity analysis.
  • Make and substantiate recommendations to
    decision-makers.

17
Transportation Planning and Traffic Calming- Part
1
Who are involved in Transportation
Planning? March 5th, 2007 by Indraneel Kumar,
AICP
18
Federal
  • Department of Transportation (DOT)- several
    administrations and bureaus (own
    management/organizational structure)
  • Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
  • Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
  • Federal Railroad Administration (FRA)
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
    (NHTSA)

Source US DOT
19
Federal
  • Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
  • Roads and highways continue to be the safest and
    most technologically up-to-date
  • Financial and technical support for
    constructing, improving, and preserving the
    highway system
  • FHWA owns about 3 of the highway/public road
    mileage, 2002

Source Highway Performance Monitoring System,
FHWA
20
Federal
  • Federal Transit Administration (FTA)
  • Administers federal funding for planning,
    construction, and operation of public
    transportation systems
  • According to National Transit Database (NTD)
  • Over 650 transit agencies
  • 140,000 vehicles
  • 48 billion passenger miles
  • 8.5 billion in fares

Source National Transit Database, FTA
21
Federal
  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
  • Provide the safest, most efficient aerospace
    system in the world
  • Responsible for the safety of civil aviation,
    airspace and air traffic management, air
    navigation facilities, etc.
  • According to National Plan of Integrated Airport
    Systems (NPIAS), 3,300 airports are significant
    to national air transportation (Airport
    Improvement Program)

Source NPIAS, FAA
22
Airports
Source NPIAS, FAA
23
State
  • State Department of Transportation prepares
    Long Range Plan, 20-30 year horizon plan and
    State Transportation Improvement Program, 3-5
    year implementation program
  • Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) is
    updating the 2030 Long Range Transportation Plan
    and integrating with the Major Moves 2006-2015
    construction program http//www.in.gov/dot/pubs/lo
    ngrange/index.html
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations
  • Regional Planning Organizations
  • INDOT District Offices
  • Stakeholders and Public Input
  • Multimodal Transportation Plan and Corridor
    Studies

Source INDOT
24
State
Source INDOT, 2004 Transportation Plan Update
25
Regional Local
  • Metropolitan Planning Organization
  • Regional Planning Organization
  • Planning Commissions (known by many names)
  • County and City Engineering Departments
  • Transit Districts
  • Fixed route or Demand responsive transit system
  • Special Purpose Districts (Government Units)
  • Airport Authorities

26
Stakeholders in the Transportation Planning
Process March 5th, 2007 by Indraneel Kumar, AICP
27
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28
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29
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30
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31
Transportation System
Transportation Systems affect several aspects in
a community, stakeholders could be from each of
the interest areas and many more.
Source adapted from Prof. K. C. Sinha, Purdue
University
32
I-69 Community Planning Program March 5th,
2007 by Jamie Palmer, AICP
33
I-69 Program
Program History
  • Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS)
    (including Volume I, Chapter 7, Mitigation, pp.
    7-5 and 7-6)
  • Established objectives of the program
  • Tier I Record of Decision (ROD)
  • Established eligible communities
  • Program announcements
  • Press release announcing program
  • INDOT website

34
I-69 Program
Program Objectives
  • Protect natural resources
  • Promote economic development
  • Manage growth
  • Enhance local planning capacity
  • Promote intergovernmental cooperation

35
I-69 Program
Program Components
  • Toolbox
  • Outreach
  • Eligible communities
  • Federal and state agencies, universities, and
    other resource organizations
  • Grant program

36
I-69 Program
Grant Program
  • Eligible Communities
  • Counties Daviess County, Dubois County, Gibson
    County, Greene County, Johnson County, Knox
    County, Lawrence County, Martin County, Monroe
    County, Morgan County, Owen County, Pike County,
    Vanderburgh County, and Warrick County
  • Cities/Towns Bedford, Bloomfield, Bloomington,
    Ellettsville, Evansville, Greenwood,
    Indianapolis, Linton, Loogootee, Martinsville,
    Mooresville, Oakland City, Petersburg, Princeton,
    Spencer, Vincennes, and Washington

37
I-69 Program
Grant Program
  • Preliminary details
  • City, town, and county governments are eligible
    partnering with other local governments and
    organizations is encouraged
  • The target award is 50,000 exact awards depend
    on need demonstrated in applications
  • Eligible activities include plans, ordinances and
    other legal instruments related to the program
    objectives
  • Successful applicants must demonstrate that the
    activity will promote natural resource protection
    per Record of Decision

38
I-69 Program
Program Schedule
39
I-69 Program
Program Website
www.i69indyevn.org/CommunityPlanningProgram
  • General information on the program
  • Information on the toolbox
  • Events calendar
  • Eligible communities
  • Grant application
  • Grant awards
  • Updates and news

40
Project Contacts
I-69 Program
Steve Smith, INDOT Project Manager 317/232-5646 ss
mith_at_indot.in.gov
Jamie Palmer, AICP 317/261-3046 jlpalmer_at_iupui.edu
Amy Williams 317/636-4682 awilliams_at_hntb.com
www.i69indyevn.org/CommunityPlanningProgram
41
Questions? ipevents_at_purdue.edu
Break, 5-minute
42
The MPO role in transportation planning
43
The MPO
  • transportation planning in urbanized areas
  • 1962 Federal Aid Highway Act
  • urbanized areas over 50,000 people
  • 224 MPOs nationwide
  • 13 MPOs in Indiana
  • condition for receiving certain highway and mass
    transit funds
  • Title 23 of the CFR 420 - 450

44
MPO structure
Policy Board
TAC
Staff
45
The three Cs
  • 3-C transportation planning process
  • Continuous
  • Cooperative
  • Comprehensive

A facilitating role, not dictating
46
Core MPO Products
  • 25 year Transportation Plan
  • multi-modal
  • fiscally constrained
  • 5 year TIP
  • Transportation Improvement Plan
  • implements the 25 year plan
  • lists federal aid and projects of regional
    significance

47
Plan Inputs
  • comprehensive land use plan
  • demographic projections
  • economic development plans
  • thoroughfare plans
  • State long range transportation plan
  • input from consultation partners
  • citizen input!

48
The TIP
  • implements the Transportation Plan
  • four year horizon (short term)
  • updated annually
  • not visionary in nature
  • shows what is being accomplished, bricks and
    mortar

49
UPWP
  • Unified Planning Work Program
  • defines the annual work program
  • approved by Policy Board and FHWA
  • funded with PL

50
Funding
  • ISTEA emphasis on flexibility
  • segmentation of funding
  • STP (Groups I, II, III, and IV)
  • TE, CMAQ, Bridge, TCSP, FTA formula, etc.
  • reflection of interests direction (SR2S)
  • earmarking

51
Summary
  • MPO regional transportation planning
  • funded federal mandate
  • strengthen the entities they serve
  • bring federal transportation dollar investment
    decisions closer to the local level

www.indianampo.com
52
CORRIDOR STUDIES FOR PLANNERS (Not Just Engineers)
John W. Myers, PE, AICP Transportation Planning
Director HNTB Corporation
53
Early Corridor Studies should support the
development approval process
Theme
Corridor Studies for Planners
54
In spite of regional transportation planning
Poorly conceived corridors abound in the U.S.
55
Transportation Planning Approach
Limitations
  • Land Use Response to Transportation
  • Access Locations
  • Aesthetic Character

56
Transportation Planning Approach
vs
1
2
Four-Lane Urban Arterial
57
Typical Engineering Studies
Are too narrow in focus and are often too late.
58
Engineering Approach
Limitations
  • Curb to Curb Design Focus
  • Defines Main Line Intersections
  • Insensitive to Land Use
  • Insensitive to Aesthetics

59
Engineering Approach
vs
2
1
Limited Definition Outside the Right of Way
60
What Do Planners Need?
  • Land Use Plan
  • Access Management Plan
  • Urban Design Plan

61
When Do Planners Need It?
  • When the First Development is Approved!

62
Prototypical Corridor
Land Use Access Management Urban Design
RONALD REAGAN
Corridor Master Plan
HENDRICKS COUNTY, INDIANA
63
Regional Context
Hendricks County is one of the fastest growing
counties in Central Indiana
Source HNTB
64
The Ronald Reagan Corridor starts at the Six
Points interchange with I-70. The interchange is
shared with the new entry to Indianapolis
International Airport.
65
CR 600/ 56TH STREET
Political Boundaries
Brownsburg
CONRAIL
CR 400 N / AIRPORT ROAD
PROPOSED RAIL TRAIL
Lincoln Township
N/S CORRIDOR
Washington Township
21st Street / CR 200 N
  • The corridor is located ½ mile from the Hendricks
    -Marion County Line
  • It extends across 3 townships
  • It passes through Plainfield and Avon, and abuts
    the east boundary of Brownsburg

Hendricks County Marion County
CR 100 N
36
ROCKVILLE ROAD
CONRAIL
Avon
CR 100 S / MORRIS STREET
N/S CORRIDOR
CR 200 S / BRADFORD ROAD
40
Washington Township
E MAIN STREET
Guilford Township
INDPLS INTERNATL AIRPORT
Plainfield
CR 450 S / STAFFORD ROAD
I-70
66
Corridor Land Use Master Plan
Existing Conditions
Composite Plans
Development Trends
Part One
Existing Data
  • Land Use
  • Utilities
  • Environmental
  • County Comp. Plan
  • Community Comp. Plans
  • Current Development
  • Community Trends

System
Steering Committee Exercises
Value
Master Plan Goals Objectives
RONALD REAGAN
Corridor Master Plan
HENDRICKS COUNTY, INDIANA
67
Overall Goal of Master Plan
  • Maximize opportunity to create high level
    development through sound land use planning
  • Preserve the integrity of the road function
    through access management planning
  • Create a premier economic address through the
    development of aesthetic standards that make the
    corridor appear as a planned twelve-mile campus

RONALD REAGAN
Corridor Master Plan
HENDRICKS COUNTY, INDIANA
68
CR 600/ 56TH STREET
Preferred Land Use Scenario
I-74
CONRAIL
CR 400 N / AIRPORT ROAD
136
Cr 300 N
PROPOSED RAIL TRAIL
Consensus Land Uses
  • Retail
  • Flex Tenant
  • Light Industrial
  • Hospitality
  • Airport Uses

N/S CORRIDOR
Land Use Plan
21st Street / CR 200 N
Land Uses
CR 100 N
Commercial Warehouse Office Single-family Medical
School Lt. Industrial Flex Airport
Uses Hospitality
ROCKVILLE ROAD
36
CONRAIL
Non-Consensus Land Uses
CR 100 S / MORRIS STREET
  • Professional Office
  • Warehouse/ Distribution

CR 1050 E
N/S CORRIDOR
CR 200 S / BRADFORD ROAD
40
E MAIN STREET
INDPLS INTERNATL AIRPORT
RONALD REAGAN
CR 450 S / STAFFORD ROAD
Corridor Master Plan
HENDRICKS COUNTY, INDIANA
I-70
69
Land Use/Economic Development Plan Results
The Premier address can become an organizing
element for land uses throughout the eastern
portion of the county.
70
Access Management
71
Access Management Elements
  • Traffic signal spacing
  • Unsignalized access spacing
  • Corner clearance
  • Medians
  • Turn lanes
  • Interchange spacing
  • Alternative access
  • Frontage backage roads
  • Shared access

72
Why Is Access Management Important?
  • Safety

TRB Access Management Manual
More signals and more driveways ? more
collisions
73
Better Access Management
  • Signal spacing poor spacing

74
CR 600/ 56TH STREET
Traffic Signal Spacing
I-74
.75 mile
CONRAIL
.4 mile
CR 400 N / AIRPORT ROAD
136
  • 1 mile (or ½ mile) uniform traffic signal
    spacing at existing crossroads for optimum
    traffic flow

1.1 mile
Cr 300 N
PROPOSED RAIL TRAIL
1.1 mile
N/S CORRIDOR
21st Street / CR 200 N
1.1 mile
CR 100 N
Legend
1.1 mile
ROCKVILLE ROAD
36
N-S Corridor (Constructed)
CONRAIL
1.1 mile
N-S Corridor (Planned)) Interchange Traffic
Signal Spacing at Existing Intersections
CR 100 S / MORRIS STREET
CR 1050 E
CR 1050 E
1 mile
CR 200 S / BRADFORD ROAD
.5 mile
40
.6 mile
E MAIN STREET
.6 mile
.9 mile
CR 450 S / STAFFORD ROAD
.75 mile
I-70
75
CR 600/ 56TH STREET
Median Openings
I-74
.75 mile
CONRAIL
.4 mile
CR 400 N / AIRPORT ROAD
136
1.1 mile
Cr 300 N
PROPOSED RAIL TRAIL
  • 1 mile (or ½ mile) uniform traffic signal
    spacing at existing crossroads for optimum
    traffic flow

1.1 mile
N/S CORRIDOR
21st Street / CR 200 N
1.1 mile
CR 100 N
  • Potential access points or median openings at ½
    mile between existing crossroads

Legend
1.1 mile
ROCKVILLE ROAD
36
N-S Corridor (Constructed)
CONRAIL
1.1 mile
N-S Corridor (Planned)) Interchange Traffic
Signal Spacing at Existing Intersections Potential
Access points or median openings
CR 100 S / MORRIS STREET
CR 1050 E
1 mile
CR 1050 E
CR 200 S / BRADFORD ROAD
.5 mile
40
.6 mile
E MAIN STREET
.6 mile
.9 mile
CR 450 S / STAFFORD ROAD
.75 mile
I-70
76
Its In The Planners Hands
Iowa Access Management Manual
77
Special Tools
  • Overlay districts
  • Access policies and ordinances
  • National resources
  • TRB Access Management Manual
  • State access management manuals
  • Indiana
  • Florida
  • Oregon
  • Iowa
  • More
  • TRB access management website
  • www.accessmanagement.gov

78
Corridor Enhancements
79
Enhancements of Corridor
  • Increase as sphere of planning
  • Elements impacted
  • Crosswalk Treatment
  • Street Signs
  • Traffic Signals
  • Light Fixtures
  • Gateway Treatments
  • Structural Treatments
  • Pedestrian Amenities
  • Median Treatments
  • Signage/Wayfinding
  • Entryways
  • Landscaping
  • Building Orientation
  • Building Architecture/Materials
  • Loading Dock Orientation
  • Trash Bins

Curbline to Curbline
27th Street
Expanded Overlay
80
Prototypical Concepts Landscaped Medians and
Accents
LANDSCAPE AND LIGHTING TREATMENT ISSUE CONSENSUS
Stone Paver Accent Banding
Landscaped medians with minimal to moderate
hardscape and softscape accent treatments were
selected for the corridor.
Landscape Accents in Median
Special Landscape accents in some Locations
Multi-Use Path
Accent Planting at Special Feature
Special Landscape Accents at Median Noses
Landscape Accents at Special Features along
Corridor
81
Prototypical Concepts Major Gateways
GATEWAY ELEMENT CONSENSUS
Structured Gateway Elements were selected for the
corridor.
Ronald Reagan Parkway
Major Gateway Sign
R.O.W Line
R.O.W Line
24 Typ.
/- 30 Typ.
16 Typ.
24 Typ.
20 Min.
/- 10 Typ.
12
Right of Way with Major Gateway Sign, Ornamental
Planting, and Flags or banners
2 Lane Roadway
Multi-Use Path
Corridor Markers
2 Lane Roadway
Buffer
Right of Way with Major Gateway Sign, Ornamental
Planting, and Flags or banners
Major Gateways
82
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83
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84
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85
Corridor Master Plan Process
Land Use Plan
Road Enhancements Plan
Access Management Plan
Conceptual Enhancements
Alternative Enhancements
Access Management Plan
Enhancement Guidelines
Community Workshops
Community Workshops
Community Workshops
Community Workshops
Land Use Scenarios
Goals Objectives
Preferred Scenario
Implementation
Data Gathering
Design Plan
Time 6 months
86
Its In The Planners Hands
  • Regional plans define roles
  • Comprehensive plan
  • Transportation plan
  • Corridor plans
  • Subarea plans
  • Subdivision/platting
  • Zoning
  • Site plan review
  • Building permits
  • Access permits

87
The Complete Corridor Study
  • Transportation Plan
  • Engineering Analysis
  • Planning Analysis
  • Land Use
  • Access Management
  • Enhancements

88
Planning
Engineering
Urban Design
89
  • John W. Myers, PE, AICP
  • Transportation Planning Director
  • HNTB Corporation

90
Transportation Planning and Traffic Calming- Part
1
Rural Transportation Planning March 5th,
2007 by Indraneel Kumar, AICP
91
Context
  • Regional planning- 1920s
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations
    (MPOs)/Councils of Governments (COGs) have been
    in existence for over three decades offering
    transportation planning for the urbanized areas.
  • What about the rural areas? Any formal/informal
    transportation planning organization?

Source USDA, NJTPA
92
Context
What is Rural America?
  • 80 percent of nations land area
  • 17 percent of nations population
  • 2,000 counties
  • 77 percent of road miles (3.1 million road
    miles)
  • Close to 40 percent of Vehicle Miles Traveled
    (VMT)

Source FHWA, USDA (ERS)
93
Issues Concerns
  • Economic activity, safety, environment,
    connectivity, demographic changes, etc.

Safety is a concern in Rural areas
  • Rural areas have 35 percent more crashes, more
    vehicles and individuals involved, and more
    deaths than in urban areas
  • In U.S., approximately 42,000 traffic fatalities
    happen each year, 60 occur on rural roads

Source National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, FHWA
94
Purpose
Why Rural Transportation Planning?
Source FHWA, FTA
95
Components
A Good Rural Transportation Plan
  • Ensures that quality of life and economy in
    rural areas is maintained and enhanced
  • Provides a wide range of investment,
    operational, and technology options
  • Fulfills transportation needs of rural residents
  • Improves multimodal and intermodal
    transportation systems
  • Provides ample opportunities to participate in
    the planning process

Source FHWA, FTA
96
Program
USDOT Rural Transportation Initiative
  • 1999 (For rural areas and small communities)
  • Plan, develop and improve air, surface, and
    water transportation infrastructure
  • Highway
  • Transit
  • Aviation
  • Rail
  • Coast Guard and Maritime Program
  • Community Enhancements
  • Safety

Source FHWA, FTA, DOT
97
RPO
Regional / Rural Planning Organizations
  • Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century
    (TEA 21), 1998
  • Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and
    Federal Transit Administration (FTA), 2003
  • Regional Development/Planning Organizations
    (known by many names)
  • Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT)

http//www.in.gov/dot/about/environment/planning.h
tml
Source INDOT, NADO
98
RPO
  • Input from rural stakeholders
  • Generally advisory in nature
  • Several areas of work
  • Safe Accountable Flexible Efficient
    Transportation Equity Act- A Legacy for Users
    (SAFETEA-LU), 2005- RPOs

Source NADO, IARC
99
Thank You!
Questions? ipevents_at_purdue.edu
Purdue Land Use Team Purdue University http//www.
ces.purdue.edu/landuse
Transportation Planning and Traffic Calming- Part
2, June 21st
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