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Studies in Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

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Title: Studies in Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness


1
Studies in Homeland Security and Emergency
Preparedness
  • Harford County Public Schools
  • Harford County, Maryland
  • June 12, 2006

2
Building A High School Program in Homeland
Security and Emergency Preparedness
3
Part One
  • Comprehensive Secondary School Reform Plan
  • Career Education
  • Accelerated Learning
  • High School Design
  • Design Support
  • Compliances
  • Alignments with USDE, MSDE, HCPS
  • Partnerships
  • System Resources Commitments
  • AHS Prototype

4
Background
  • The investigation of secondary education and
    possible methods for its improvement have been
    on-going for more than a decade. HCPS alone has
    been actively studying this since spring of 2002.
    The enacting of No Child Left Behind further
    encouraged these efforts and is now accelerating
    their incorporation into high school educational
    program formats across America.

5
A Nation At Risk
  • Prompted the dialogue that surrounded
    comprehensive school reform
  • Stimulated various reform initiatives
  • Encouraged a statistical evaluation of best
    school practices
  • Fostered the school improvement movement

6
Qualities of Effective Schools
  • High Expectations for all students
  • Student ownership of their learning
  • Purposeful, inter-related programs of study
  • Student-centered learning environments
  • Strong presence of student advocacy
  • Learning connections that go beyond the classroom
  • Dedicated and qualified instructional staff

7
  • The intent of the Harford County Public Schools
    Comprehensive Secondary School Reform Plan has
    always been, and continues to be, to develop a
    forward thinking secondary education that will
    carry our students into the workplace of the
    twenty-first century.
  • Harford SchoolsMarch 2005

8
Justification
  • Serving all students equally well
  • Meeting the various assessment standards
  • Creating an environment that motivates and
    inspires students to elevate personal achievement
  • Creating smaller personal learning communities
    that foster stronger positive adult-student
    relationships
  • Preparing students for the twenty-first century
    workplace

9
Source of Validation
  • The National Association of Secondary School
    Principals and its combined national and
    international research consortium of experts in
    the various fields of secondary education has
    served as the clearing house for all research and
    program components. These combined resources
    represent the most experienced, knowledgeable,
    and proven educators in the world.

10
The TheoryBreaking Ranks OneA Major Theme
  • Personalization High Schools must break into
    units of no more than 600 students so that
    teachers and students can get to know each other
    better. Then, teachers should use a variety of
    instructional strategies that accommodate
    individual learning styles and engage students.
    This will be helped by every student having a
    personal adult advocate and a personal plan for
    progress.

11
The PracticeBreaking Ranks 2
  • This second edition serves as a field book for
    both validating and implementing elements of
    secondary school reform. Schools across the
    United States are using the research-based
    recommendations found within this text as their
    guide to accomplishing the intent previously
    expressed by our Board in Harford Schools in
    March 2005.

12
Three Primary Related Themes
  • 1.Personalized Educational Programs
  • Student ownership of their education
  • Appropriate remediation strategies
  • Purposeful career education
  • Intentional character education strategies
  • Alternative forms of educational services (AEP)
  • Programs that capitalize upon student interests
  • and talents

13
  • 2. Creating Smaller Learning Communities
  • Utilization of teams, career clusters, academies
  • and magnet programs
  • Promoting opportunities for integrated learning
  • Connected coursework and learnings
  • Expanded alternative education approaches

14
  • 3. Raising Standards and Expectations
  • Increasing credits for graduation
  • Creating a more purposeful senior year
  • Requiring more related coursework
  • Increasing assessment proficiencies

15
Educational Intuitions
16
Educational Indicators
  • Two of the strongest predictors of effective
    high schools remains whether a child can identify
    one adult that knows them well and can advocate
    for him/her and whether the learner has a vested
    interest in daily engagement in their learning.
  • Accomplishing this through smaller learning
    communities and interconnected learning
    experiences appears to hold great potential for
    success.

17
Educational Measures
  • State Assessmentsand SAT, AP, etc.
  • Attendance Rate
  • Graduation Rate
  • Drop-Out Rate
  • Safe Secure Learning Environments

18
  • Harford
  • Countys
  • Response

19
Organize schools into smaller learning
communities
  • The depersonalization of education that is
    caused by large organizations with random course
    selection has less of an opportunity of engaging
    students on a personal level and creating
    increased student advocacy. In the absence of
    such relationships, many less-focused students
    are lost in the masses with little connectivity
    to their educational programs. A commitment to
    create smaller intellectual environments within
    high schools has the greatest potential for
    nurturing the adolescent learners quest for
    knowledge and responsibility for their education.

20
Develop additional off-campus educational
experiences including internet, college, and
e-learning
  • As students learning profiles become
    increasingly more personalized and complex, the
    ability of the system to develop specialized or
    advanced coursework becomes strained.
    Additionally, the traditional process of
    curriculum development, as well as the methods of
    instructional delivery, become less effective.
  • (cont.)

21
  • The use of technology driven coursework not
    only engages students in a different and
    motivating format but also allows for highly
    individualized methods and specific content
    delivery. Additionally, it can provide a
    continuum of learning that transcends the walls
    of the schoolhouse and access to expanded
    educational and research based information.

22
Create dynamic and connected programs of study
that engage students and inspire the personal
ownership of the learner
  • Student motivation and apathy are continuously
    cited as a major contributing factor to those
    students who feel disenfranchised or
    disinterested in their personal education.
    Students will naturally become more vested in
    their own education when they perceive value and
    purpose to the instruction which they receive.
  • (cont)

23
  • Aligning programs of study with student
    interests and talents is essential to developing
    greater motivation on the part of all students.
    Improved motivation should have a corresponding
    positive effect on attendance, behavior, and
    performance.

24
Addressing the themesAt the High School level
25
Accelerated Learning
Career Clusters
  • For the typical student, the Career Clusters
    allow them to explore areas of personal interest
    that are aligned with the emerging job markets.
    Previously less-focused students that will
    benefit from this increased intentionally.
  • For the advanced student, Accelerated Learning
    programs will allow them to explore higher levels
    of academic and intellectual engagement in more
    focused areas.

26
Career Clusters
  • Career clusters are utilized at each high
    school to encourage greater purposeful engagement
    by the student. The intent is to provide
    collections of coursework that have career
    connectivity and are supported by either the
    universal or local job markets. Students are
    primarily identified within the comprehensive
    school but could be magneted from across the
    district.

27
Accelerated Learning Magnets
  • Accelerated Learning programs are envisioned
    at each of the high schools to serve the needs of
    our most gifted students. Placement is
    determined by local interest and ability to
    support a particular magnet program. This
    magnet concept can be used to facilitate
    accelerated learning programs.

28
High School Program Design
29
Design Support
  • Alignments with USDE, MSDE, HCPS
  • Alliance With Community Business
  • External Partnerships
  • Dedicated and Original Funding Streams
  • Compliances
  • System Resource Commitments
  • Champions Shepherds

30
Prototypical DesignAberdeen HighScience Math
Academy
  • The Office of Curriculum Science Supervisor
  • The Army Alliance
  • Battelle, Lockheed, Northrup, etc.
  • Congressional Budget, State Grants
  • The Offices of Grant Management CTE
  • FTEs, Per Pupil Expenditures, Budget
  • The Principal and Site Coordinator

31
DesignJoppatowne HighHomeland Security EP
  • The Offices of Curriculum and CTE and the
    Systems Coordinator
  • The HSEP Advisory Committee
  • Local Related HSEP Industries
  • Congressional Budget, State Grants
  • The Offices of Grant Management CTE
  • FTEs, Per Pupil Expenditures, Budget
  • The Executive Director, System Coordinator,
    Principal, Site Coordinator

32
Questions Answers
  • Comprehensive Secondary School Reform Plan
  • Career Education
  • Accelerated Learning
  • High School Design
  • Design Support
  • Compliances
  • Alignments with USDE, MSDE, HCPS
  • Partnerships
  • System Resources Commitments
  • AHS Prototype

33
Part Two
  • HSEP Background
  • Needs Assessment
  • BRAC Anti-terrorism
  • Governors Biotech
  • Occupations

34
Homeland Security Industry Snapshot
Growing Industry 40 billion in 2004 to 180
billion in 2015 (Homeland Security Research
Corporation Estimate)
Fastest growing sub-sector of homeland security
Cyber security 15-20 annually through 2010
(Frost Sullivan Analysis of Current and Future
U.S. Homeland Security Market)
Median annual compensation for security
professionals in the United States in 2004
75,200 5.9 increase over 2003 (ASIS U.S.
Security Salaries Survey Results, 2005)
35 of all U.S. companies planning to invest in
and expand security programs in 2005 (ASIS
International Foundation Trends Report, 2005)
35
(No Transcript)
36
Summary Comprehensive Needs Assessment, Summer
2005
37
Program Objectives
38
Developing the following career pathways
utilizing County, State, and Federal Stakeholders
Criminal Justice/ Law Enforcement
Information/ Communication/ Technology (ICT)
Junior Reserve Officer Training Corp
Homeland Security Sciences
39
PME 1.0
Staff Function
PME 1.1
Guidance Function
PME 1.2
Project Management (1.4.1)
CTE Projects (1.4..2)
Courseware Development (1.4.3)
Class work and Syllabus (1.4.4)
Future PAC
Program Management Elements (PME)
40
The Road Ahead
Prioritize County involvement / secure grant
funding
Build a seamless/cost effective program among all
Counties in Maryland Build an information
sharing system that responds to the demand
for information, interoperability, and a
cooperation rich environment
Involve Government, Academia, and Private Sector
in developing the program
41
  • The protection of our homeland is the
    responsibility of every citizen, government
    agency, business, educational institution, and
    organization, both public and private. We must
    all work in unison to secure peace, prosperity
    and freedom, the hallmarks of our country.

QUESTIONS?
42
Questions Answers
  • HSEP Background
  • Needs Assessment
  • BRAC Anti-terrorism
  • Governors Biotech
  • Occupations

43
Part Three
  • Advisory PAC
  • Seed Grants
  • MSDE Compliances
  • Foundation Course
  • 3-Pathways
  • Articulation

44
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Career Completer Program

45
Homeland Security Industry Snapshot
  • Growing Industry 40 billion in 2004 to 180
    billion in 2015
  • (Homeland Security Research Corporation
    Estimate)
  • Fastest growing sub-sector of homeland security
    Cyber security 15-20 annually through 2010
  • (Frost Sullivan Analysis of Current and
    Future U.S. Homeland Security Market)
  • Median annual compensation for security
    professionals in the United States in 2004
    75,200 5.9 increase over 2003
  • (ASIS U.S. Security Salaries Survey Results,
    2005)
  • 35 of all U.S. companies planning to invest in
    and expand security programs in 2005
  • (ASIS International Foundation Trends Report,
    2005)

46
Stakeholders Federal Level
  • United States Department of Defense
  • United States Department of Education
  • United States Department of Homeland Security
  • United States Department of Justice
  • Federal Emergency Management Agency
  • all coordinated through the National Partnership
    for Careers in Law, Public Safety, Corrections,
    and Security (Dr. Joe Coffee, Executive Director)

47
Stakeholders State Level
  • Maryland State Department of Education
  • Maryland Emergency Management Agency
  • Department of Public Safety and Correctional
    Services
  • Governors Office on Homeland Security
  • Consortium of colleges and universities
    University of Maryland College Park, University
    of Maryland Baltimore County, Towson University,
    Anne Arundel Community College, Frederick
    Community College, Cecil Community College, and
    Harford Community College
  • Representatives from 24 of the 24 school systems
    in Maryland

48
Stakeholders Local Level
  • Harford County Government
  • Harford County Board of Education
  • Harford County Law Enforcement Agencies, all
    jurisdictions represented
  • Aberdeen Proving Ground (U.S. Army Edgewood
    Chem/Bio Center)
  • Private sector/local businesses (Upper Chesapeake
    Health Goldbelt Raven EAI Corporation)
  • Harford County Economic Development Advisory
    Board
  • Northeastern Maryland Technology Council

49
Seed Grant Money
50
Career Cluster Framework
51
Homeland Security Program within the MSDE Cluster
Framework
52
Process for Developing New CTE Program Proposals
  • Steps 1A Establish program advisory
  • and 1B committee and conduct labor market
    needs analysis
  • Step 2A Review cluster, pathways, and skill
    standards to identify the program to be
  • developed. Describe the program based on
    desired student outcomes.
  • Step 2B Describe each CTE completer course and
    identify end of course assessments
  • Step 2C Determine appropriate curriculum,
    end-of- program assessments, licenses, and
    certifications
  • Step 2D Complete the secondary program matrix

53
Process for Developing New CTE Program Proposals
(cont.)
  • Step 2E Specify the type(s) of value-added
    options available to students (credentials
    or postsecondary credit)
  • Step 2F Identify the work-based learning
    experiences provided to students
  • Step 2G Identify the CTSO provided to students
    in the program
  • Step 3 Identify sites and allocate resources
  • Step 4 Submit Proposal to MSDE/DCTAL
  • Step 5 Implement and continuously improve
  • programs

54
Pathway Program Template
Certification Work
Two-Year Degree
Four-Year Degree
55
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Foundations Course

56
Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency
Preparedness (HSEP)
  • Developed by Harford County Program Advisory
    Committee
  • One credit course, fall semester
  • Required for 10th grade students pursuing HSEP
    Studies
  • Includes a general overview of HSEP and an
    introduction to

57
Foundations of HSEP (cont.)
  • Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency
    Preparedness
  • Historical and contemporary perspectives
  • Policies and guidelines of HSEP
  • Improvements Since 9-11
  • Cultural and sociological perspectives

58
Foundations of HSEP (cont.)
  • Elements of Emergency Response
  • Roles of Emergency Responders
  • Roles of Federal Agencies
  • Roles of Supporting Federal Agencies
  • Inter-relationship of local, state, and federal
    agencies
  • Methodologies of Intelligence Gathering and
    Communications
  • Who, What, and How and Why
  • Geospatial Technology and Remote Sensing

59
Foundations of HSEP (cont.)
  • Threats to Public Safety and Public Health
  • Natural Disasters
  • Man-made Disasters
  • Deliberate Releases
  • Countermeasures

60
Foundations of HSEP (cont.)
  • Personal and community responsibilities
  • Selection of One of Three Strands
  • Homeland Security Science
  • Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement
  • Information and Communications Technology

61
Questions Answers
  • Advisory PAC
  • Seed Grants
  • MSDE Compliances
  • Foundation Course
  • 3-Pathways
  • Articulation

62
Part Four
  • Curriculum Development
  • Professional Development
  • Program Sustainability

63
Curriculum Development

64
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Homeland Security Science Strand

65
Homeland Security Science Strand Course Two
Homeland Security Science
  • One credit course, 11th Grade
  • Includes an in-depth understanding of
  • Threats to Public Safety and Threats to Public
    Health
  • Types of Decontamination
  • Personal and Collective Protection concepts
  • Field instrumentation and laboratory analysis
  • Plan for both chemical and biological incidents

66
Homeland Security Science Strand Course Three
Research Methods and Applications
  • One credit course, 12th Grade- First Semester
  • Includes an in-depth understanding of
  • Proper methods of research and analysis of key
    Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
    concepts
  • Technical writing techniques and applications
  • Interpersonal communication skills and group
    dynamics
  • Current laboratory skills and practices

67
Homeland Security Science Strand Course
Four Internship and Capstone Project
  • One credit course, 12th Grade- Second Semester
  • Internship or capstone project that may include
  • Several weeks in a laboratory or field setting
  • Development of a professional portfolio
  • Research paper
  • Series of field experiences

68
Proposed Strand Layout
69
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Strand

70
The Criminal Justice System
  • Foundation Course (Sophomore Year)
  • The Criminal Justice System (Junior Year)
  • Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Capstone
    Project (Senior Year)

71
The Criminal Justice System
  • Existing Curriculum
  • Administration of Justice
  • Administration of Justice I
  • First Semester, 11th Grade
  • Introduction to Criminal Justice and Corrections
  • Juvenile Justice System
  • Constitution Law

72
The Criminal Justice System
  • Administration of Justice II
  • Second Semester, 11th Grade
  • Criminal Investigations
  • Forensic Investigations

73
Proposed Strand Layout
74
Opportunities
  • College Credits
  • Developing articulation agreement with Harford
    Community College
  • Mentoring Program
  • Youth Academy
  • Law Enforcement Explorer Program
  • Volunteer Program
  • Job Opportunities
  • Cadet Program
  • Corrections

75
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
  • Information and Communications Technology Strand

76
Information Communications Technology Strand
77
CISCO as a Seamless Transition into Network
Security
  • CISCO Certification Program already established
    at Joppatowne High School.
  • CISCO courses are a major component of the
    Community Colleges Network Security Program.

78
Strand Layout
79
SPACESTARS PROGRAM
  • Created by industry to address need.
  • Based on 39 industry defined competencies
  • Only geospatial technologies certification
    program recognized by the Federal Department of
    Labor

80
SPACESTARS PROGRAM
  • Focus on ArcView 3.3 , 9.2 skills, and Remote
    Sensing
  • Partners include Stenis Space Center (NASA),
    ESRI, Berkley Geo-research Group, and Digital
    Quest.
  • Education is the link to local government

81
Proposed Strand Layout
82
Professional Development
  • Teacher Training
  • Private Sector Assistance
  • Governmental Assistance
  • Curriculum Writing Teams
  • Higher Education Articulation

83
Program Sustainability
  • Annual HCPS Commensurate Funds
  • External Advocacy Support Groups
  • (Army Alliance, NEMTC, FEMA, MEMA, UAWG)
  • Continued USDL, USDE,, MSDE Endorsements
    Funds
  • Corporate Sponsorship Input
  • Local Workforce Commitments
  • Program Management Integration

84
Questions Answers
  • Curriculum Development
  • Professional Development
  • Program Sustainability

85
Contacts
  • David A. Volrath Executive Director,
    Harford County Public Schools
  • david.volrath_at_hcps.org 410-588-5208
  • Frank Mezzanotte Magnet Coordinator, Harford
    County Public Schools
  • frank.mezzanotte_at_hcps.org 410-638-3804
  • Michael Mazza Eastern Regional Director,
    Goldbelt Raven LLC
  • mike.mazza_at_us.army.mil 410-688-7977
  • Ruth Hoskins Emergency Operations,
    Harford County, Maryland
  • rjhoskins_at_co.ha.md.us
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