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Canadian Customer Contact Centre Landscape An Industry in Transition

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Human Resources Profile, Education and ... CCCs represent one of the key emerging trends in the 21st century ... Source: NBI/Michael Sone Associates Inc. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Canadian Customer Contact Centre Landscape An Industry in Transition


1
Canadian Customer Contact Centre Landscape An
Industry in Transition
  • Human Resources Study Overview
  • And
  • Next Steps
  • September 2002

2
Presentation Outline
  • Background and Structure of Study
  • Study Objectives
  • Sector Profile and Evolution
  • Technology and Channel Trends
  • Human Resources Profile, Education and Training
  • Issues and Recommendations
  • The Sector Council Model
  • Group Discussion and Follow Up

3
Background
  • CCCs represent one of the key emerging trends in
    the 21st century
  • CCCs are effectively an industry with its own
  • Language
  • Technology
  • Culture
  • Despite growing impact and role in business
    today, little research on
  • Size
  • Demographics
  • Trends
  • Human resource challenges

4
Background (continued)
  • However, there is an explosion in
  • Number of contact centres
  • Size of the centres
  • Functionality and technology
  • Value to their organization
  • Value to Canadian economy

5
Background (continued)
  • Estimated to be in excess of 14,000 contact
    centres
  • Offering direct employment to over 1/2 million
    staff (FT/PT) (3.4 of employed population)
  • 36 Billion annually in salaries (with an average
    yearly salary of 32,130 for CSRs)
  • 37.6 Billion / 4.01 of Total Canadian Gross
    Domestic Product
  • Relative to 1st position Manufacturing 169
    Billion / 18

6
Background (continued)
  • CCCs clearly have 3 strengths relative to
    competition in general, but specifically to the
    United States
  • 1. Workforce Quality and Availability
  • high education levels
  • a comparatively lower attrition rate
  • a comparatively higher employment rate
  • multiculturalism and language capabilities

7
Background (contd)
  • 2. Infrastructure and Location Consideration
  • proximity to U.S.
  • technology infrastructure
  • short lead time for startup
  • 3. Financial Perspective
  • exchange rate
  • CCCs are in a strategic position to evolve and
    contribute even more substantially to the
    National / Global economy

8
Structure of Study
  • Research Data Gathering
  • Industry experts interviews
  • CC and educational institution interviews
  • Survey of establishment in Aug Sept 2001 (500)

HRDC Analysis and Need Assessment
  • Terms of Reference Development
  • Consultant Hire

Steering Committee Formation
Human Resources Environment Profile
  • 5 Review Meetings
  • Steering Committee
  • HRDC
  • PWC

Market Environment Profile
Education Training Environment Profile
Study Recommendations
Industry Environment Profile
Technology Environment Profile
9
Study Objectives
  • Provide a clear picture of the sector through
    quantitative information
  • Identify key emerging market drivers
  • Identify specific public policy, legislative and
    regulatory issues affecting the contact centre
    sector
  • Provide a human resource profile
  • Explore human resource issues of importance
    across the sector
  • Provide an analysis of the flow of potential
    recruits and employees through the education and
    training system
  • Forecast the likely direction for the sector in
    the future and
  • Identify barriers and recommend actions to be
    taken to meet identified human resource
    challenges.

10
Definition of Contact Centre (for purposes of
this Study)
  • An internal or out-sourced operation largely
    based on telecommunication and data supports
    whose primary role is to provide one or many
    relationship channels for customers, clients,
    employees or suppliers. This may include inbound
    and/or outbound, person-to-person and
    self-service contact capabilities that include
    service, sales, marketing, fulfillment or data
    collection.

11
CCC by Regions
  • Over 50 of Canadas CCC operations are located
    in Ontario followed by Quebec at 18
  • Western Canada comprises nearly 25 of all CCC
    operations compared with 7 in Atlantic Canada

Source PWC Consulting
12
Distribution by Industry Sector
13
Sector Size and Composition
  • CCC Overall Sector Size

Source NBI/Michael Sone Associates Inc.,
Canadian ACD/CCC Market Report, 1996 2000 /
PricewaterhouseCoopers  
14
Size of CCCs
  • Agents Percentage
  • 1-6 17
  • 7-12 30
  • 13-24 30
  • 25-50 12
  • 51-74 5
  • 75-100 2
  • 101-200 2
  • 201 2
  • 77 of all centres have less than 25 agents,
    still more-and-more
  • companies are recognizing that one aspect of
    their operations
  • is the contact centre.

15
Technology Trends
Supporting Technology Planned Implementations
2001 PriceWaterhouse Coopers
16
Technology Trends
Multi-Channels are driving the need to integrate
handling scheduling of multiple media contacts
  • Increased use of self-help applications creating
    complexity of inquiries in live channel
  • Increased opportunities for global market suppor
  • Increased opportunities for operations through
    Internet and e-mail.
  • Need for each channel to have channel-specific
    performance metrics.

17
Changing Trends in Channel Management
18
Human Resource Planning
  • CSRs in CRM/IMC Centres will require skills in
  • Effective communication
  • Technological skills
  • Sales Skills
  • Speak more than one language

19
Recruitment Challenges
  • Strategy an important element of CCCs business
    plan and must be consistent with culture, value
    and performance criteria of the organization.
  • High staff turnover in sector exacerbated in
    strong economy with relatively low unemployment
  • Greater pressure to find right people quickly so
    they dont get hired by other CCCs
  • Costs Between 1000-2000 to recruit and select
    a CSR
  • Add training and this cost can increase to
    7500-12,000 depending on position and
    responsibilities (CSR Technical Support)

20
Recruitment Process, Attracting Candidates
Differentiation
  • According to Survey of Establishments
  • Education Levels of CSRs hired in the last two
    years
  • 43 of CSRs have post-secondary diploma or
    degree
  • Inbound centres CSRs typically have higher level
    of education than outbound centres
  • 43 of inbound centres report that their CSRs
    have post-secondary diploma or degree
  • 28 of outbound centres report that their CSRs
    have post-secondary diploma or degree

21
Education and Training
  • PARTNERSHIPS
  • Many Contact Centres Partner with Colleges and
    other educational systems to provide training
  • GAP ANALYSIS
  • Training for CSRs is well covered off (in-house /
    institutional)
  • Only a few formal management programs
  • Internal management training generally not
    offered
  • Few training opportunities for supervisors/coaches
  • Technical support in several educational
    institutions but not all provinces

22
Summary of Issues and Challenges Identified
  • Profile / Image of Canadian Customer Contact
    Centre Industry
  • despite some perceptions
  • salaries and benefits are competitive . . . .
  • working environment is ergonomically sound . . .
    . .
  • responsibilities can be challenging and rewarding
    . . . . .
  • leading edge technology is a reality . . . . .
  • Rapidly changing business and customer demands
  • customer expectations have increased
  • technology growth and diversity is creating need
    for strategic change
  • Training to meet future needs
  • skills, knowledge and capabilities required of
    staff is increasing as well as shifting

23
Recommendations
  • 1. Establish a National CCC Sector Human
    Resources Council
  • Develop a leadership role in implementing study
    recommendations
  • Develop a political capacity to look after CCC
    sectors HR/training interests

24
Recommendations (contd)
  • 2. Develop a CCC image / marketing campaign
  • Market the sector to the general public as a
    place for a career
  • Market the sector internally to the CCCs

25
Recommendations (contd)
  • 3. Develop a recruitment and retention strategy
  • Attract people with appropriate skills knowledge
    and capability for the contact centres of the
    future
  • Develop generic HR tools
  • Develop a CCC career path
  • Develop job descriptions

26
Recommendations (contd)
  • 4. Develop a strategic partnership with
    educational institutions and other training
    providers
  • Identify generic vs specialized training needs
  • Develop/promote transferable skills and
    certification/diplomas
  • Explore expansion of relevant training
    programs/including training for managers

27
Recommendations (contd)
  • 5. Develop a strategy to produce/share
    information
  • Make benchmarking and other HR related
    information available to the sector
  • Identify standards for continuous improvements

28
End of Part I
Questions on the Presentation or
Recommendations?
29
From a Sector Partnership to a Sector Council
Key driver in Skills Learning Agenda
  • A world class workforce needs new skills to meet
    changing economic, technological and demographic
    demands
  • Sector Councils have a proven track record in
    addressing the continual needs of workers
  • Councils are a catalyst for collective industry
    action

30
The Sector Council Model
  • Definition
  • An organization that provides a neutral
  • decision-making forum for management and
  • labour to determine human resource issues
  • within a sector and to develop and implement
  • a sectoral human resource strategy.

31
The Sector Council Model (continued)
  • Key elements of a Sector Council are
  • board of directors representative of those
    involved within the sector
  • board members with authority to make decisions on
    behalf of their constituency
  • a specific organizational focus on human
    resources
  • a commitment to continuity of engagement in
    planning and action

32
The Sector Council Model (continued)
Organizational Chart
Industry Academic Labour Associations
BOARD
Executive Director
Admin. Assistant
Committees
A
B
C
E
F
G
Note Salaries of Director and Assistant funded
by HRDC
33
Benefits of the Sectoral Model
  • A proven track record - national network of 26
    sector councils represented by firms and workers
    in their industry
  • A solid diagnostic capacity and understanding of
    industry skills issues
  • A consensus approach around human resource issues
    and action
  • The development of innovative approaches that
    improve workplace learning
  • Improve the responsiveness of educational
    institutions to industry skills needs, and
  • Promote a culture of continuous learning in our
    industry

34
Relationship Between Sector Council and
Associations
35
The Sector Council Model (continued)
  • A sectoral initiative supported by Human
    Resources Development Canada
  • There are three phases in developing a council
  • Consensus Building Activities
  • Developmental Activities
  • Operational Activities

36
The Sector Council Model (continued)
  • Phase 1 - Consensus Building Activities (today)
  • communicate results of study to industry
  • seek industry feedback on study findings
  • seek industry input regarding follow-up
    activities
  • gain support and commitment from key stakeholders
    for a sector council
  • workshop structure of Council and information on
    best practices (end 2002)

37
The Sector Council Model (continued)
  • Phase 2 - Developmental Activities
  • staff board of directors and administrative
    assistant
  • develop mission and mandate statement
  • develop 5 year plan
  • gain industry support for organizational
    structure and business plan
  • incorporate council as a legal, non-profit entity

38
The Sector Council Model (continued)
  • Phase 3 - Operational Activities
  • implement business plan activities
  • develop and implement a communication plan to
    promote awareness of the Council
  • revise the business/strategic plan on an annual
    basis
  • Update board / administrative structure as
    required

39
Optimizing and Sustaining Performance
  • Exemplary councils would require four core
    attributes for optimal performance
  • Responsive (industry driven, address industry
    skills needs)
  • Representative (driven by the collective interest
    of industry partners on a national basis)
  • Connected (linkages that involve and influence
    the learning system, e.g. colleges)
  • Results-based (sectoral activities demonstrate
    positive impact on industry skills development)

40
Optimizing and Sustaining Performance
  • New funding model to sustain council stability
    and performance results-based business plan
  • Sustained support contingent on exemplary status
    (results assessed against business plan
    objectives)

41
Examples / Initiatives Projects
  • Canadian Council for Human Resources in the
    Environment Industry
  • Environment Recruitment, Retention and Learning
  • Canadian Automotive Repair and Service Council
    (CARS)
  • Interactive Distance Learning
  • Workplace Mentor/Coach Program
  • Software Human Resources Council
  • Mapping of the IT Labour Market

42
The Purpose of Todays Group Discussion
  • To review Study recommendations
  • To understand your perspective and interest in
    the creation of the CCCC Sector Council
  • Follow-Up
  • Summary of Meeting Results emailed to participants

43
Table Discussion
  • The questions to be discussed and answered refer
    to one specific recommendation assigned to your
    table
  •  Likes and dislikes on a recommendation
  •  Elements to include or exclude from a
    recommendation

44
Individual Questionnaire
  • To be answered by each participant and returned
    to the facilitator
  • A commitment to pursue further involvement in a
    future meeting regarding sector council activities

45
End of part II
  • Any Questions before Group Discussion Begins?
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