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TRAIN TO GAIN BROKERS PRESENTATION

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Title: TRAIN TO GAIN BROKERS PRESENTATION


1
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2
  • TRAIN TO GAIN BROKERS PRESENTATION

3
  • AGENDA

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7
  • SECTOR ISSUES

8
SECTOR PROFILE / CHARACTERISTICS
  • Contributed 7.2 billion to England economy in
    2004
  • 500,000 paid employees in 5 sub-sectors
  • Whole sector employment is evenly distributed
    across England
  • Sector includes paid workers, self-employment and
    unpaid voluntary work in over 30,425 public,
    private, voluntary and not-for-profit
    organisations
  • 70 of sector organisations employ 10 people or
    less
  • 5.8 million volunteers
  • 1.2 million coaches, 81 are volunteers

Source Experian Business Strategies, 2005 and
Sport England
9
PAID EMPLOYMENT IN THE SECTOR
10
EMPLOYMENT BY JOB STATUS
11
REGIONAL EMPLOYMENT DISTRIBUTION 2004
Experian Business Strategies 2005
12
VOLUNTEERS
  • Sport and exercise are the most popular field of
    interest for volunteering at 43
  • Interest has grown by 6 since 2001
  • Youth/ childrens activities also attracts 26 of
    volunteers
  • Volunteers are concentrated into key occupations
  • Coaching and officiating
  • According to SkillsActive research, sector
    organisations only have 3 out of 4 of the
    volunteers they need
  • They were only able to recruit 6 more volunteers
    in the last year

13
SECTOR GROWTH OVER LAST 5 YEARS
  • Employment growth has soared over 4 times that
    of all industries in England with an average
    annual growth rate of 4.1
  • Active Leisure and Learning has performed twice
    as well as the English economy over the last 10
    years in GVA output
  • The sector is still expected to outperform the UK
    until 2014, despite slowing down
  • Growth fuelled particularly by Sport, Fitness
    Outdoors and Playwork

14
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15
CONSUMER AND GOVERNMENT DRIVERS
Positive drivers
Negative drivers
Drop in disposable income
Extended schools agenda
Playwork
Full employment
Increased taxes
Fuel prices
Increased concerns about child safety
Increasingly sedentary lifestyles
Sport
Government investment in Sport
Work / life balance
Increased leisure time
Consumer spending
Fitness
Luxury spend
Increasing participation rates
Perception of risk
Outdoors
Ageing population
Organised adventure holidays
Outdoor Education manifesto
Planning and licensing
Caravans
Customer expectations
Cheap flights and foreign holiday homes
The housing market
16
RECRUITMENT AND SKILLS
  • 24 of establishments report a vacancy
  • 42 of sector organisations with a vacancy found
    them hard-to-fill
  • 54 of organisations with a hard-to-fill vacancy
    attributed it to a skills shortage reasons (lack
    of experience, qualifications or skills required)
  • Skills shortage vacancies represented 19 of all
    vacancies
  • 16 considered they had a skills gap.

Source NESS 2004
17
QUALIFICATION PROFILE FOR SKILLSACTIVE
NVQ equivalent level
18
SKILLS NEEDS FOR ACTIVE LEISURE AND LEARNING NEXT
3 YEARS
National Employer Skills Survey 2003
19
COACHING
  • There are 1.2 million coaches in the UK
  • 81 of these are volunteers only 230,000 are
    paid
  • Only 1 in 4 are paid full time - 60,000
  • 38 of coaches hold a coaching qualification
  • 730,000 need a qualification
  • Average age of a coach is 37
  • Over 70 of the general public would take up a
    coaching course if funding was made available
  • Half the funding to reach UK Coaching Certificate
    targets would 12 m

Source Sports Coaching in the UK, MORI 2004
20
REGISTER OF EXERCISE PROFESSIONALS
  • Provides evidence of competence
  • 30k first time registrations
  • 8,000 instructors on provisional status
  • Need to up-skill to Level 3 for special
    populations
  • improved and rationalised training provision

21
TRAINING PRIORITIES FOR SKILLSACTIVE
TECHNICAL
  • Statutory requirements OfSTED defined for work
    with under 8s treated as the norm for work with
    children
  • Vocational Level 2 /3 REPS or National
    Governing Body of Sport, Playwork etc
  • Few are publicly funded
  • Customer service / communications
  • Generic modules to be introduced to UK Coaching
    Certificate
  • Management training
  • Problem solving
  • Basic skills including IT

GENERIC
22
KEY QUALIFICATIONS FOR SKILLSACTIVE
SPORT AND FITNESS
  • Management - Professional bodies ILAM, ISRM
  • Community / Junior Sport Activity Leader Award
    (CSLA / JSLA
  • Fitness instructors REPS Lev 2
  • Personal Trainer REPS Lev 3
  • Exercise referral REPS Lev 3
  • Recreation staff Statutory training NPLG for
    lifeguards, first aid, health safety
  • National Governing Body Awards
  • Coaching - NGB Level 1 - 4
  • Officiating - NGB Level 1, 2 or 3
  • Degree for Sport Development

OUTDOORS
  • APIOL Accredited Practitioner of the
    Institute of Outdoor Learning
  • In-house training for non-NGB activities
  • Introductory Training Programme
  • NGB Coaching Level 1,2 or 3
  • Work-based NVQs
  • Minibus driving qualification
  • Degree for Adult education

23
KEY QUALIFICATIONS FOR SKILLSACTIVE
CARAVAN INDUSTRY
  • CITO National Certificate in Park Management
  • CITO Safe siting - Edexel
  • NVQ2 Operational Services (Caravan Parks) - City
    Guilds
  • NVQ 3 (Leisure Management) currently awaiting
    approval
  • City Guilds Certificate for workshop
    technicians (touring caravans)

PLAYWORK
  • NVQ 2 Playwork
  • NVQ 3 Playwork
  • Certificate in Playwork
  • Diploma in Playwork
  • Foundation Degree

24
Stage Two - Results
25
HIGHER EDUCATION
  • The number of places has increased by 35 since
    1999
  • c 15,000 students study courses in the
    SkillsActive sector
  • over 14,000 are in sport or fitness
  • Less than a third of graduates go on to get a job
    in sport or fitness
  • Only 50 of those said it was a requirement for
    the job
  • Employers think graduates lack vocational skills
  • 500 in the Outdoors and just 80 for Playwork
  • Most of these do find employment in the sector

26
TRAINING AND SPEND IN LAST 12 MONTHS
Whole economy
SkillsActive
  • Proportion of staff trained
  • Ave no. of days per employee
  • Ave spend per employee
  • Ave spend by organisation
  • Playwork proportion of staff trained
  • Ave no. of days per Playwork employee
    SkillsActive
  • Ave spend per Playwork organisation
  • Ave proportion of staff trained (Sport, Fitness,
    Outdoors)
  • Ave no. of days per employee SkillsActive
    (Sport, Fitness, Outdoors)
  • Ave spend per organisation Sport, Fitness,
    Outdoors)
  • Ave no. of days per employee on training in
    Fitness
  • Ave spend on training in Fitness
  • Proportion of training in Fitness funded by
    employee
  • Ave proportion of Caravan Parks providing
    training
  • Ave no. of staff receiving training
  • 71
  • 6.1 days
  • 139
  • 2,390
  • 90
  • 9.5
  • 2,000
  • 91
  • 5
  • 7022
  • 6
  • 338
  • 45
  • 57
  • 10

70 6.3 225 4150
Ness 2004 / Playwork / SFO Employment and Skills
Survey 2005 / Working in Fitness survey 2005 /
Caravan Parks Report 2004
27
FUNDING SOURCE FOR RVQ LEARNER AIMS
28
LSC PRIORITIES
  • New LSC Funding Priorities unintended
    consequences?
  • 5 cap on franchising and partnerships
  • 19 FE funding 4 (06/07) 3 (07/08)
  • 500,000 fewer learning opportunities for adults
  • More support for longer more expensive courses
    at the expense of leisure learning
  • The Level 2 entitlement, full NVQ achievement, or
    full fat VRQs and 16-19s

29
QUALITY OF TRAINING BY TYPE OF PROVIDER
Excellent
Disappointing
Employer Training Survey 2005
30
SCOPE FOR IMPROVEMENT
Employer Training Survey 2005
31
Stage Three ANALYSIS OF GAPS AND WEAKNESSES
32
STAGE THREE REPORT
  • One pan-UK, pan-sector report
  • Identifies common issues or challenges
  • With some sector or country specifics
  • Proposes range of solutions for the sector,
    stakeholders and delivery partners
  • With some sector or country specifics
  • Regional stakeholder fora will / have been
    arranged
  • Regional action plans will be developed to
    promote national and regional solutions to
    SkillsActives Sector Skills Agreement

33
THE RIGHT PEOPLE WITH THE RIGHT SKILLS
  • Seven KEY Priorities for action
  • Improve quality and range of services
  • Improve Recruitment
  • Improve Retention
  • Professionalise and Upskill Existing Workforce
  • Match Supply to Demand
  • Re-direct Funding
  • Increase sector investment in our people

34
  • Improve quality and range of services
  • More sustainable public funding
  • Better recognition of the value of Playwork
  • Meet the skills challenge of the 2012 Olympics
  • Constant drive to meet customer expectations
  • Improve Recruitment and Retention
  • Better Careers advice in schools and colleges
  • Clear Career progression routes
  • Develop Skills Passports
  • Explore improvements to pay and conditions

35
  • Professionalise and Up-skill Existing Workforce
  • Improve percentage of coaches with a
    qualification
  • Make coaching a priority skill
  • Register of qualified playworkers / fitness
    instructors
  • Up-skill Fitness instructors for special
    populations to level 3
  • Improve qualification levels in the Caravan
    Industry
  • Match Supply to Demand
  • Oversupply of sports science graduates
    introduce HE Employability Index
  • Too many graduates without practical skills -
    more vocational (Foundation) degrees
  • Improve quality of FE delivery and FE content
    destination data
  • Introduce qualifications where they are missing
  • Standardise training so skills are transparent
    and transferable

36
  • Re-direct Funding
  • Reduce barriers to accessing training more
    local, flexible, work-based training
  • Funding for coaching qualifications
  • Funding for 25, job changers and volunteers
  • Reduce bureaucracy of funding applications
  • National contracts for National Governing Bodies
  • Increase sector investment in our people
  • Explore quality work experience for students,
    tutors and assessors
  • Encourage employer use of workforce development
    plans
  • Increase training levels of the sector
  • Mentored and assessed volunteering experience

37
SSA STAKEHOLDERS
  • RDA
  • Regional Skills Partnership
  • LSC
  • Business Link
  • Job Centre Plus
  • GO
  • TUC
  • HEI and HE representatives
  • Sport England
  • Regional Sports Boards
  • County Sports Partnerships
  • Sportscoach UK
  • National Governing Bodies of Sport
  • Register of Exercise professionals
  • Playwork Regional Centres

38
SSA STAKEHOLDER FORA
39
Warwick Andrews Lesli Godfrey (Play)
SkillsActive RDM Team 2006
Rob Williams Cat Ross (Play)
Dian Shaw Bev Amison / Mark Bryce (Play)
Jeff Spencer Julia Merivale (Play)
Stuart Wilson Julia Fallowfield (Play)
Sonia Birch Camilla palmer (Play)
Jackie Hayhoe John Fitzpatrick (Play)
Kim Egerton / Craig Wooldridge Leonie
Labistour (Play)
James Emmett Vanessa Roberts (Play)
40
A LEVEL PLAYING FIELD ACROSS ENGLAND
  • SkillsActive organisations are present in every
    community
  • Sector organisations want to see parity of
    support and investment across the regions
  • They want to cut bureaucracy with
  • joined up funding
  • national contracts for funding and delivery of
    training
  • The Chancellors budget provides 600m Olympic
    games, 200 m for Elite athletes and 6 m for
    school sports
  • Need for a structural platform for the SSA to be
    assessed and encompassed within regional plans

41
SUMMARY OF PRIORITIES QUALIFICATIONS
  • Establish a framework of technical qualifications
    linked to national standards
  • Broaden Soft Skills training and assessment
    around technical qualifications
  • A vocationally relevant qualification at level
    2/3 for each occupation to be on each National
    Qualifications Framework
  • Initiate industry investigation into the pool of
    30 in the industry with no level 2
    qualifications
  • Create new programmes with HE to develop sector
    linked management and business skills
  • Explore ways to give increased value to the
    skills acquired in the industry especially
    volunteers

42
SUMMARY OF PRIORITIES - FUNDING
  • Support for upskilling and professionalisation of
    existing workforce
  • Support for short course, bite-size, flexible
    delivery programmes
  • Recognise and support skill needs of volunteers
  • Switch emphasis to work-based learning
  • Support industry drive to create national
    frameworks that support career development
  • Value our services recognise and support
    experiential learning (through adventure, sport
    and play) as a key part of skills development in
    the UK
  • Work towards equality of funding across the UK
    the industry needs national solutions, accessible
    locally

43
OUR SECTOR DELIVERS
  • Active People and Active Communities
  • Improved Health and Social Integration
  • Economic Growth Through Regeneration, Tourism and
    Growing Employment
  • Personal and Social Development
  • Fun and Adventure
  • Improved Quality of Life
  • National Pride

LET US DELIVER THEY TRAINING THEY NEED
44
REGIONAL SPECIFICS
45
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46
  • HOW IS SKILLSACTIVE STRUCTURED?

47
THE UK STRUCTURE
PATRONS
BOARD OF EMPLOYERS
England
Northern Ireland
Scotland
Wales
SECTOR COUNCIL
48
Wales Manager John Byers
SKILLSACTIVE TRADING LIMITED
REPS
Chief Executive Stephen Studd
Public Affairs Officer Will Pickering
Executive Assistant Mike Burrows
Account Officer Vicky Hembry
EOSE Secretariat Aurelien Favre
Head Of Business Development Florence Orban
Head of Unit Sport and Recreation Phil Collier
Head of Unit Playwork Paul Bonel
Finance and Administration Director Martin Ellis
Head of Unit Home Countries Ashley Pringle
Head of Unit Research Information Muriel
Bankhead
Head of Unit Technical John Thorpe
Marketing Manager Matthew Hickey
Professional Development Manager Steve Woolland
Programme Manager N.Ireland Siobhan Weir
Programme Manager Funding and Project
Management Honore Kitenge
Research Manager
Qualifications Manager Ben Gittus
Financial Controller Joy Marais
Community Development Manager Bansari Samani
Entry to the Workforce Manager Steve Mitchell
Programmer Manager Wales Richard Tobutt
Communications/ PR Manager Shelly Beresford
Research Manager Beth Fowler
Programme Manager Qualifications
Standards Dawn Newton
Facilities Manager Doug Burtenshaw
Programme Manager Exercise Council Wales Rhian
James
Outdoor Manager Peter Thompson
Research Analyst Liz Chan
9 Regional Managers WM Sonia Birch Lon Jackie
Hayhoe YH Rob Williams NW Dian Shaw SE James
Emmett SW Craig Wooldridge NE Warwick
Andrews East Stewart Wilson EM Jeff Spencer
Programme Manager
Cross Sector Manager Sue Hook
Communications Officer Playwork Uzma Ahmed
Programme Manager Scotland Pam Scott
Programme Manager Funding Policy Chris
Martin
Programme Manager (part-time) Children and
Young People Drew McCanney
Development Officer Standards Lee Buck
Communications and Marketing Officer Paul Durrans
Programme Manager - Regions Maggie Patchett
Finance Officer Shila Patel
Web Editor
Development Officer Frameworks and
Careers Nicola Temple
Programme Manager Playwork Policy UK
Senior Admin and QA Officer Kiran Sahota
Finance Officer Bo McDougal
Admin Officer Cheryl Francis/ Stacey Baker
Development Officer Youth Apprenticeships Katie
Couchman
Communications and PR Assistant Danielle Powell
Admin Assistant Valerie Pringle
Team Admin Julie Stancombe
Development Officer Outdoors and Cross Sector Kim
Harman
9 Regional Centres
Reception Sally Rensch
49
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50
  • HOW DOES SKILLSACTIVE DEVELOP STANDARDS?

51
DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL STANDARDS
  • Requires
  • A Standards Setting Body recognised and approved
    by government
  • Funding and project management from the
    Qualifications and Curriculum Authority

52
DEVELOPMENT AND REVIEW PROCESS
Functional Map
Standards Plan
Convening of Working Groups
Approval/Accreditation by QCA
Development of N/SVQ Structures
Development of Standards
Industry Consultation
53
THE OCCUPATIONAL MAP
  • The Types of Occupations in the Sector, Numbers
    Employed and Any Anticipated Changes in
    Employment Patterns
  • Roles Played by Key Employers, Trade
    Associations, Professional Bodies, Trade Unions
    and Statutory Bodies
  • Existing Qualifications, Application and
    Positioning
  • Opportunities for Progression and Career Routes
  • Relationship Between Existing Standards and
    Occupations
  • Key Information Sources

54
The Functional Map
  • A functional map is the framework for developing
    national occupational standards.
  • It should provide
  • A breakdown of all the functions staff in the
    industry need to carry out
  • A model of good practice
  • A forward-looking perspective
  • In summary, everything that it necessary and
    sufficient for the workforce to achieve the
    overall mission of the industry

55
CONTENTS OF A FUNCTIONAL MAP
  • A Key Purpose summarising the overall mission
    of the industry
  • Key Areas describing very large areas of work,
    often undertaken by whole groups of staff
  • Key Roles describing major functions carried
    out by teams or individuals
  • Units of Competence describing the functions
    carried out by individuals.

56
Key Roles
What needs to happen to achieve?
Key Areas
A1. Plan the exercise and fitness business
A. Provide fitness professionals and facilities
that will meet peoples needs, abilities and
potential.
A2. Initiate the exercise and fitness business
plan
A3. Manage the exercise and fitness business
Key Purpose
A4. Review the exercise and fitness business
Enable everyone to develop and maintain their
health- and performance-related fitness by
providing and monitoring safe and effective
services and products that meet individuals
needs, cater to their abilities and help them
achieve their potential.
A5. Administer the exercise and fitness business
A6. Establish, maintain and develop business
relationships
B1. Promote and sell exercise and fitness
services and products
B. Provide and develop exercise and fitness
services and products for individuals
B2. Educate healthy adults by providing exercise
and fitness
B3. Educate special populations by providing
exercise and
B4. Research and develop exercise and fitness
services
C. Provide a safe and quality experience for
individuals
C1. Maintain safety within the facility
C2. Provide and improve customer service
C3. Provide and maintain quality equipment and
facilities
D. Support continuing professional development
D1. Continue to develop own professional skills
and knowledge
D2. Develop the professional skills and knowledge
of others
57
STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT
  • Units are either
  • Developed from scratch
  • Identified from the National Database of
    Vocational Qualifications and tailored to the
    needs of the industry

In both cases using industry working groups
58
CONTENTS OF A UNIT
  • Heavy emphasis on plain English and user
    friendly layout
  • Front page summary of unit contents and target
    group
  • Explanations and examples of terms used
  • Performance standards
  • Knowledge, understanding, values and skills
  • Key and Core Skill signposting

59
N/SVQ DEVELOPMENT
  • The N/SVQs are developed by packaging the units
    in the functional map, according to the
    information contained in the occupational map.
  • The most favoured approach now is core and
    options. This provides maximum flexibility to
    the industry.

60
INDUSTRY WIDE CONSULTATION
  • Postal consultations by structured questionnaire
  • Focus groups
  • Posting draft standards on the website
  • Mediation of feedback by industry working group

61
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62
  • HOW DOES SKILLSACTIVE WORK CROSS SECTOR?

63
CROSS SECTOR WORK ADDING VALUE TO SECTOR
EMPLOYERS?
  • The work is lead by the technical unit
  • John Thorpe, Head of Unit
  • Sue Hook, Cross Sector Manager
  • Lee Buck, Development Officer
  • The work falls into three main areas
  • Management and Leadership National Occupational
    Standards (NOS) project
  • Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS) workforce
    project
  • Cross sector work through designated staffing of
    SSDA direct funded cross sector posts.

64
1. MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP CHAMPIONS WORK
  • We have 2 champions one from playwork and one
    from the regional development team.
  • Maggie Patchett National Playwork Manager
  • Rob Williams Regional Development Manager,
    Yorks
  • Both have been
  • reviewing M and L NOS importations into sector
    specific NOS (including 2 of our suites)
  • raising awareness of M and L as a priority for
    our sector.
  • contacted training brokerages to ensure
    management raining for playworkers in north yorks
    is mapped to the standards
  • secured LSC funding for volunteers in sport to
    access m and l training

65
2. VCS INTO SECTOR SKILLS AGREEMENT (SSA)
  • Jackie Hayhoe, RDM for London, is our VCS
    ambassador
  • ran an event recently for VCS employers to enable
    them to input into the SSA process and up to
    August 60 of the SSA responses had come from the
    VCS.
  • A cross sector VCS seminar run and hosted by us
    involved our employers and raised our profile
    significantly with some who were otherwise
    unaware of SSCs and the SfBN( Skills for business
    network)

66
3. LINKS TO OTHER SSCS
  • This has resulted in good working relationships
    with many SSCs and sharing of good practice (e.g.
    careers IAG (information, advice and guidance)
    with Skillset).
  • We have also formed useful relationships with
    Standard Setting Bodies (SSBs) including
    Management Standards Centre, SfEDI etc.
  • This means questions or requests for help from
    our employers can be dealt with effectively and
    promptly.
  • We have also been sited on several occasions as
    examples of good practice SSDAs approach to us
    to work with ENTO came out of our raised profile
    with them re Management and Leadership

67
4. OPPORTUNITIES FOR OUR EMPLOYERS
  • Opportunities for our employers to pilot a
    business solutions website autumn 2005 showing
    real solutions to real problems contextualized
    for the sector.
  • We are being funded to interface directly with
    employers and offer them a service.
  • This is only possible because of our work on the
    steering group of this project and the resultant
    relationship with Skillsfast

68
5. RAISING PROFILE WITH PARTNER ORGS
  • Greatly raised profile in the VCS and with our
    VCS employers via a (hard won) close working
    relationship with NCVO, SCVO, WCVO and NICVA via
    their Workforce Development Hub.
  • Increased access to help and resources for our
    VCS employers via our VCS ambassador

69
6. NOS DEVELOPMENTS
  • Our NOS contain more generic management materials
    both in the VCS and using management and
    leadership NOS.
  • in playwork , operations and development and
    spectator safety management our sector managers
    of the future will have more transferable skills
  • our employers will find it easier to recruit as
    they recognise generic management skills as
    relevant to them.
  • Working with industry expert groups on standards
    development using generic NOS raises their
    awareness and widens their experience

70
7. PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT
  • Careers development in partnership with Skillset
    has produced an excellent product benchmarked
    to the SSDA agreed standard via the Skillset led
    IAG project and for the first time offering an
    exciting careers service to our employers and
    potential employees
  • www.skillsactive.com/careers

71
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72
  • HOW DOES SKILLSACTIVE WORK WITH SKILLS FOR LIFE?

73
SKILLS FOR LIFE
  • THE FACTS
  • 23 of adults in work in England struggle with
    maths or English
  • 49 out of 50 jobs are closed to people with low
    literacy and numeracy skills
  • 4 out of 5 jobs created now will require skill
    levels above A-level and only one third of
    Britons have these.
  • 30 of graduates have literacy levels below level
    2
  • 15 million people in the workforce have poor
    numeracy skills

74
WHAT ARE SKILLS FOR LIFE?
  • Adult literacy, language and numeracy skills are
    often referred to using different terminology.
    Skills for Life is the definition used in
    England. It represents
  • The ability to read, write and speak in English
    and to use mathematics at a level necessary to
    function and make progress at work and in society
    in general.
  • Skills for Life is also known as the government
    strategy for improving adult literacy and
    numeracy and basic ITC skills in England.

75
TERMINOLOGY FOR LITERACY, LANGUAGE AND NUMERACY
USED ACROSS THE FOUR NATIONS
  • England Skills for Life - covers basic skills,
    key skills and GCSE (English and Maths A-C
    grades). Skills for Life includes literacy and
    numeracy skills as documented in National
    Standards from entry 3 to Level
  • Wales Basic Skills - covers literacy and
    numeracy skills as documented in National
    Standards from entry 3 to Level 1
  • Northern Ireland Essential Skills - cover
    literacy and numeracy skills as documented in
    National Standards from entry 3 to Level 2.
  • Scotland Core Skills or Literacies is also
    used. Literacies cover the range of skills
    identified as needed for family life, employment
    and citizenship.

76
TERMINOLOGY (cont)
  • Employability and Generic skills are also terms
    that have been applied to the skills described
  • And now the introduction of Functional Skills
    which will eventually replace Skills for Life.
  • Functional English, functional mathematics and
    functional ICT will form a core element of
    English, maths and ICT GCSEs respectively, but
    they are being introduced for young people first.

77
THE BUSINESS CASE
  • Why do Skills for Life matter?
  • Do you want you employees to
  • Be skilled enough to do their job now and in the
    future
  • To stay with you and value the place in which
    they work
  • Feel engaged and involved in the workplace

78
WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?
  • Poor adherence to health and safety procedures
  • Inaccurate/poor quality paperwork e.g. health and
    safety documents, reports
  • Poor communication with customers and colleagues
  • Staff reluctant to take on extra tasks/ transfer
    skills and be responsive to the needs of the
    environment
  • Poor time management and planning skills
  • High absenteeism and staff turnover
  • Staff do not benefit from training/ chance to
    develop their skills
  • Inability to read and understand written
    instructions
  • Poor team working skills

79
BENEFITS IN THE WORKPLACE
  • Improved performance
  • Improved quality assurance
  • Improved communication
  • Improved compliance with regulations
  • Improved customer relations
  • Improved recruitment
  • Improved retention
  • Realising existing potential
  • Increased profits

80
CASE STUDIES
  • Businesses
  • Greenwich Leisure,
  • Liverpool Leisure Services
  • Individuals
  • Captain of Brighton and Hove FC

81
RESOURCES
  • The Provider Toolkit
  • www.thenetwork.co.uk/providertoolkit
  • A comprehensive bank of information on workplace
    language, literacy and numeracy (LLN), for
    practitioners, learning representatives and
    brokers. guidance, case studies, proformas, and
    exemplar materials to support and supplement
    training and development activities. 

82
  • Skills for Life Make it your Business
  • A newly revised toolkit for employers wishing to
    look into literacy, language and numeracy skills
    gaps in the workforce. A step by step guide
    through the process from hints and tips on
    identifying LLN gaps to implementing provision.
    help you address issues, face challenges and find
    solutions to business problems arising from poor
    literacy and numeracy skills. 
  • Skills for Life Make it your business is made up
    of four hard-copy sections, a CD-Rom and a
    video. 
  • Order your free copy from dfes_at_prolog.uk.com or
    0845 60 222 60 quoting Ref ETKV2-2004.

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USEFUL LINKS
  • Skills for Life Strategy Unit - The Unit is
    responsible for implementing 'Skills for Life',
    the national adult literacy, numeracy and
    language strategy in England.
  • Avanti Books - The most comprehensive supplier of
    resources to support basic skills teaching. The
    materials cover literacy, numeracy and ESOL key
    skills and workplace basic skills family
    literacy and lifelong learning.
  • BBC Learning - BBC2's 'Working' series, year
    round television programmes on the Learning Zone
    that support learning for all those who want to
    get into or on in work.
  • BBC Skillswise - Skillswise is an interactive
    adult literacy and numeracy resource from the BBC
    for tutors and learners. The website includes
    quizzes, games, activities and printable
    resources.
  • BSAThe Basic Skills Agency - An independent
    organisation which mainly funded by the
    Government through grants from the Department for
    Education and Skills (DfES) and the Welsh
    Assembly Government.
  • BSA Observatory - The Observatory is developed by
    the Basic Skills Agency. The Observatory of Basic
    Skills is the only place where information about
    literacy, numeracy and language as they impact on
    everyone from early years to adult life can be
    found.

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  • Campaign for Learning - They aim to stimulate
    learning that will sustain people for life.
  • CBI Confederation of British Industry - The UK's
    premier independent business organisation. It
    exists to ensure that the government of the day,
    the European Commission and the wider community
    understand both the needs of British business and
    the contribution it makes to the well being of UK
    society.
  • ELWa - Education and Learning Wales is the joint
    name for the National Council for Education and
    Training for Wales and the Higher Education
    Funding Council for Wales.
  • Hertfordshire Professional Development Resource
    Centre - for basic skills providers and teachers.
  • IiP Investors In People UK - Formed in 1993 to
    take national ownership of the Standard, protect
    its integrity and ensure its successful promotion
    and development.
  • LSC 'Skills for Life' Quality InitiativeThe
    Learning and Skills Council (LSC) Skills for Life
    Quality Initiative is a major LSC programme that
    supports the implementation and delivery of
    Skills for Life the national strategy to improve
    adult literacy and numeracy skills. The Skills
    for Life strategy underpins both Success for All
    and the Skills Strategy.

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  • Move On - A national project aiming to share the
    success of a pilot project in Somerset and
    developing its approach further. It offers Level
    1 and 2 learners the new national Certificate in
    Adult Literacy and numeracy with a free brush-up
    course, aiming to reach new learners who dont
    see themselves as needing help with their basic
    skills.
  • NATECLA (National Association for Teaching
    English and Other Community Languages to Adults)
    - A national forum for English and community
    language teaching issues.
  • National Extension College - a non-profit-making
    educational trust. They provide a range of
    distance learning basic skills courses including
    mathematics, numeracy, English, reading, writing
    and languages.
  • National Literacy Trust - The National Literacy
    Trust is an independent charity dedicated to
    building a literate nation.
  • The Learning and Skills Council - Responsible for
    all post-16 education and training. The LSC's
    national office is based in Coventry, with 47
    local Learning and Skills Councils across
    England.

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  • National Research and Development Centre (NRDC)
    for Adult Literacy and Numeracy - National centre
    dedicated to research and development on adult
    literacy, language and numeracy. It was
    established as part of Skills for Life, the
    national strategy for improving adult literacy
    and numeracy skills. The Centre aims to improve
    practice and inform policy through the generation
    of knowledge, by creating a strong research
    culture and by developing professional practice.
  • Research and Practice in Adult Literacy - RaPAL
    is the only British national organisation that
    focuses on the role of literacy in adult life. We
    are an independent network of learners, teachers,
    managers and researchers in adult basic
    education. RaPAL was established in 1985 and is
    supported by membership subscription only.
  • Scottish Executive - Learning Connections -
    Learning Connections is part of the Regeneration
    Division of Communities Scotland. It is made up
    of two linked teams which are central to the
    Scottish Executive's strategies for social
    inclusion and the regeneration of Scotland's
    diverse communities.
  • SEEOnline (South East England Online) - A website
    for sharing knowledge. It aims to encourage
    interaction between organisations in the South
    East through the easy transfer of information and
    experience online.
  • Skills for Life - A guide to funding adult
    literacy and numeracy learning programmes.
  • Skills for Life Network - On-line news and
    information resource for Skills for Life
    Professionals. The fortnightly e-news updates
    contain a round up of the latest Skills for Life
    news, developments, events, resources and jobs

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  • Social Exclusion Unit - The Social Exclusion Unit
    was set up by the Prime Minister to help improve
    Government action to reduce social exclusion by
    producing 'joined-up solutions to joined-up
    problems'.
  • SEEDA (South East England Development Agency) -
    Established by the Government through the
    Regional Development Agency Act 1998, and came
    into operation on 1st April 1999 to take the
    strategic lead in promoting the sustainable
    economic development of the region. There mission
    is to work with our partners to make the South
    East of England a world class region, achieving
    sustainable development and enhanced quality of
    life as measured by Economic Prosperity,
    Environmental Quality and Social Inclusion -
    ensuring meaningful employment for all.
  • Talent (Training Adult Literacy, ESOL and
    Numeracy Teachers) - Professional Development
    site for teachers of adult literacy, ESOL and
    numeracy, funded by the London Development Agency
    and hosted by Tower Hamlets College, London. This
    site is designed to support teacher training and
    the development of qualified language, literacy
    and numeracy teachers.
  • TUC Learning Services - Provides the strategic
    framework to support the union role in learning
    and skills, and gives training and support to the
    growing number of Learning Reps.
  • UfI / Learndirect - Ufi's learning services are
    being delivered through Learndirect, which
    provides access to innovative and high quality
    courses, over 80 percent of them on-line.
  • WEA Workers' Educational Association - The WEA,
    which was founded in 1903, aims to provide high
    quality learning opportunities for adults from
    all walks of life, but especially those who may
    have missed out on learning in early life, or who
    are socially and economically disadvantaged.

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  • HOW DOES SKILLSACTIVE HELP EMPLOYERS?

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INVEST IN SKILLS
  • SkillsActive is Shaping Skills for the Future,
    through
  • PEOPLE
  • ensuring all people in the sector are
    appropriately trained and qualified.
  • PRODUCTIVITY
  • ensuring better performance through the
    professional development of the sector. 
  • PROVISION
  • ensuring the sector has accessible, relevant and
    funded training across the UK.
  • PROMOTION
  • ensuring the contributions of the sector are
    recognised at a governmental level.

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MEMBERSHIP
  • Employer Engagement is critical to our success!
  • You are all now members
  • We have developed a membership package which is
    to add benefit to your business
  • The benefits of membership include
  • INFORMATION electronic, quarterly funding
    updates
  • SUPPORT on training, qualifications, standards,
    website
  • EVENTS - discounts
  • CONSULTANCY mapping of qualifications,
    development of training
  • POLICY CONSULTATION quarterly updates
  • RESEARCH facts, figures
  • BROKERAGE SERVICE access to training providers
  • DIALOGUE!!! With Government and the agencies

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SKILLSACTIVECAREERS
  • To be THE first point of contact for any
    individual, employer, or organisation enquiring
    about Careers in our Sector
  • To improve the careers advice available (from
    other sources and careers professionals) to both
    current and prospective employees in our sector
    across the UK
  • To work with Key Partners and Employers to ensure
    the right messages and the right advice is being
    offered
  • To increase awareness of our employers, relevant
    qualifications, relevant skills and our sector as
    a whole
  • To work with Connexions, Learndirect, Next Step
    and Job Centre Plus
  • To develop links with the IAG professional bodies
    (e.g. ICG/AGCAS/NAEGA)

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What do we have available??
  • www.skillsactive.com/careers
  • Virtual Careers Advisor Ask Dougie
  • Learndirect UfI helpline
  • SkillsActiveCareers Brochure
  • Fact sheets and Case studies
  • Technical advice
  • Employer/Key Partner Links
  • HC Careers Organisations Links
  • Job Websites
  • Introductory CD Rom
  • B-Live and Sports Hub Products
  • 28/29 September BE INVOLVED WITH JOB SCENE

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CURRENTLY..
  • SAC Strategy CoHesion
  • SSDA IAG Project
  • Updating LMI on the National Guidance Research
    Forum
  • Developing presentation templates and delivering
    workshops to Careers IAG Professionals
  • Cross Sector Careers Group Skillset Mentoring
  • Collaborations with Careers Scotland, Careers
    Wales and Careers NI
  • Learndirect Helpline Updates and Hot Courses
    Search

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NANCY OVENS BURSARY
  • We are working with the Nancy Oven Trust to
    sponsor an exciting skills development bursary
  • It is aimed at paid or voluntary coaches, who
    work with children and young people
  • It will be awarded to those who wish enhance
    their own skills
  • The awards will be supported by a mentor
  • Can last for up to 2 months and be worth up to
    2500!
  • So who can apply????

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NANCY OVENS BURSARY (cont)
  • Open to all Coaches/Leaders who work in our
    Sectors, with limited access to training in their
    work
  • Worked for a min of 2 years
  • Open to both paid and unpaid
  • Must be endorsed by Employer
  • Must work with Children/Young People
  • WE HAVE FOUR WINNERS THIS YEAR.

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The SkillsActive Academy
  • What Is It?
  • How Can I Get Involved?

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ContextOur Sector State of Play
Bad News Recruiting relevant staff. Retaining
good staff. Training provision and needs
mismatched. Unclear vocational routes. Lack of
quality volunteer training. Underdeveloped
customer care skills. Poor succession
planning. Over reliance on academic
qualifications. Estimated 26.6m training
shortfall.
Good News Vibrant times. 8.6bn GVA
contribution. 3.9 pa growth rate (4x UK
plc). 634,000 paid staff. 5.8m volunteers. 100,000
new jobs by 2014. Additional 70,000 leavers
pa. Extra 90,000 jobs for 2012 Olympics.

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The Solution?
  • Training delivery.
  • Employer controlled.
  • New.
  • Innovative.
  • One of a network of National Skills Academies.
  • Sustainable

The SkillsActive Academy
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CASH CONTRIBUTION
THE PROPOSITION
Further Ed
Higher Ed
National
Private TPs
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What are National Skills Academies?
  • Single most important reform facing skills
    training today.
  • At the apex of new and existing learning
    networks.
  • Designed by industry for industry.
  • Facilitated by Sector Skills Councils, recognised
    by Government.
  • Coordinate.
  • Drive up standards.
  • Accredit.

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Our Model -UK wide, 3 levels
  • Regional Hubs
  • 12 physical locations
  • Supporting local network of Centres of Excellence
    CoVES, FE/HE institutions, private training
    providers, schools and specialist sports
    colleges.
  • National Faculties
  • Subject based fora of employers, training
    providers, partners and trade associations.
  • Examples in coaching, leisure management,
    outdoors, event management, playwork, caravans,
    management/leadership, sporting excellence.
  • Virtual Platform
  • Online HQ/Apex
  • Coordinating mechanism, governance/financing,
    running complete structure.

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Finance
10m set up costs. 3.5m government. 200k
London regional hub. LT revenue funding LSC and
employers. 60 training currently paid for in
house. 5m sponsorship target (charitable).
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Whats In It For Me?Why Get Involved?
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Next Steps How Do I Get Involved?
by 19 June 2006
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Workforce Development Planning Workshop
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Aim
  • The aim of the workshop is to leave with a good
    working knowledge of workforce development and
    the role it can play in the development of a
    business or organisation

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Outcomes
  • By the end of this workshop you should be able
    to
  • Describe the process of workforce development
    planning
  • Identify the benefits of workforce planning.
  • Relate workforce planning to the success of an
    organisation
  • Create an action plan for your organisation

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WORKSHOP PROGRAMME
  • What is workforce development
  • Key facts about workforce development
  • Scenarios
  • Skills gaps and skills shortages
  • Practicality
  • Solutions
  • Action Planning
  • Check outcomes

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The Sport Recreation Workforce CURRENT STATE
OF PLAY
  • A fragmented approach
  • Low priority given to workforce development
  • Little influence with key strategic partners
  • Under investment
  • Supply not meeting demand
  • Little respect for professionalism of workforce

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The Future VISION FOR 2012
  • Successful partnerships
  • Co-ordinated strategies
  • Greater investment
  • Mainstream education and training
  • A recognised profession
  • A great place to work

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Research shows.
  • 24 of establishments report a vacancy
  • 42 of sector organisations with a vacancy found
    them hard-to-fill
  • 54 of organisations with a hard-to-fill vacancy
    attributed it to a skills shortage reasons (lack
    of experience, qualifications or skills required)
  • Skills shortage vacancies represented 19 of all
    vacancies
  • 16 considered they had a skills gap.

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How do we ensure success?
  • Increase Participation Success
  • Make Participation Essential Spend
  • Retain Customers
  • Improve Service Quality
  • Deliver New Services Lifestyle
  • Deliver for Government and LAs
  • Capitalise on 2012 Olympics

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Role of SkillsActive
Skills Active
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Skills gaps and shortages
  • Skills gaps
  • People in work do not possess the required skill
    levels to perform their role (also known as a
    training gap).
  • Skills shortages
  • The skills are in short supply and it is
    difficult to recruit somebody with the required
    skills.

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Examples
  • Skills gaps
  • A Sports Development Officer earning a promotion
    to a management position but not having any
    experience of managing people. This person has a
    skills (or training) gap and will require
    training to become a competent manager.
  • Skills shortages
  • The creation of a new position within an
    organisation such as Workforce Development
    Officer, requiring skills that the current
    workforce do not have.

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What is workforce development?
  • In groups
  • Define workforce
  • Define workforce development
  • Without using either word!

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Workforce Key Facts
  • Contributed 8.6 billion to UK economy in 2004
  • The sector employs 634,000 paid employees in 5
    sub-sectors
  • Whole sector employment is evenly distributed
    across UK
  • Sector includes paid workers, self-employment and
    unpaid voluntary work in over 36,500 public,
    private, voluntary and not-for-profit
    organisations
  • 5.8 million volunteers

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Scenario questions
  • Who are the people?
  • How would a workforce development plan help?
  • What are the key issues?
  • What do they need to do?

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Scenarios
  • Voluntary sports club
  • Coach development
  • Volunteer management
  • Membership
  • Small/medium enterprise (SME)
  • Staffing
  • Management
  • Membership

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Practical gaps and shortages
  • Pick one of the roles from scenario
  • Identify the main skills gaps and / or shortages
  • Identify solutions

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Action Plan
  • Use the sheet to complete an action plan with a
    minimum of 3 and a maximum of ten actions

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Outcomes
  • Describe the process of workforce development
    planning
  • Identify the benefits of workforce planning.
  • Relate workforce planning to the success of an
    organisation
  • Create an action plan for your organisation

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The Guide
  • The Guide to Successful Workforce Development
    Planning
  • Glossary of Terms
  • Audit Information
  • Training Needs Analysis
  • Skills for Life Screening
  • Departmental / Organisational Needs Summary
  • Annual Training Planner
  • Useful Contacts
  • Workforce Development Plan Templates
  • Workforce Development Plan Blank

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