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Growing up Healthy: Combating Childhood Obesity

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Title: Growing up Healthy: Combating Childhood Obesity


1
Growing up Healthy Combating Childhood Obesity
2
Did you know?
  • 15 of American children are overweight.
  • Overweight adolescents have a 70 chance of
    becoming overweight or obese adults.
  • Childhood obesity can lead to pediatric
    hypertension, type 2 diabetes, coronary disease,
    stress on weight bearing joints, low self esteem.
  • 60 of children 5-10 years of age have at least
    one risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

3
Definition of overweight
  • Weight for Height (growth charts)
  • Body Mass Index for ages 2-20
  • Weight(lbs.)/Height(in.)/Height(in.)x703
  • This number is charted on a BMI chart for
    children
  • 95th percentile or greater is overweight
  • 85th-95th percentile is at risk for overweight
  • 5th 85th percentile is normal weight
  • 5th percentile or less is underweight
  • BMI chart available at www.cdc.gov/growthcharts

4
Call for Action
  • If child has a high BMI
  • Dont single them out
  • The main goal is to grow into their weight
  • If weight loss is necessary, slow, gradual weight
    loss is desired.
  • No fad diets!

5
Genetics
  • While genetics is a strong underlying factor, it
    is still just one factor.
  • A variety of unhealthy behaviors overrides
    genetic tendencies.
  • While genetics can provide a slow metabolism,
    exercise can help to overcome that.

6
Unhealthy Behaviors
  • Putting butter on everything
  • Eating mostly meat and potatoes-rarely with a
    vegetable, fruit and milk
  • Eating candy bars or chips as regular snacks
  • Pig out when you eat out
  • Eating or snacking in front of the TV or while
    reading
  • Reaching for food due to stress, boredom, anger,
    or just because its there
  • Drinking regular pop and other empty calorie
    beverages rather than milk or water.

7
Unhealthy Behaviors
  • Spending hours surfing the Internet
  • Choosing TV over outdoor activities
  • Considering exercise a chore
  • Parking the car near the front door of the mall
  • Taking the elevators instead of the stairs

8
Why is Obesity on the Rise?
  • Food selections
  • Food trends
  • Skipping breakfast
  • Decreased physical activity
  • Televisions influence

9
  • We spend more money on high fat, high calorie
    foods, and less on foods that will keep us
    healthy.

10
  • America has gotten out-of-control with portion
    sizes, and many lack self-control with eating.

11
  • Many children and their parents or caregivers
    live very sedentary lifestyles…the most exercise
    they get is clicking the remote button.

12
  • We do not hesitate to pay 3.19 for a bag of
    chips, but we refuse to spend that much on a
    bag of oranges.

13
  • We have larger and fancier kitchens, but we cook
    less.

14
  • We have pre-packaged foods, kitchen gadgets, and
    hundreds of cookbooks, but no time to cook.

15
  • We look to medicine to restore health, rather
    than to nutrition and healthy lifestyle to
    maintain our health.

16
  • We buy treadmills, exercise videos and gadgets
    but then complain about using them.

17
The Influence of a Parent or Caregiver
  • Children model their parents or caregivers
    behavior and eating patterns.
  • Treating the parents or caregivers and children
    is more effective than directly treating the
    obese child alone.
  • Parents or caregivers with poor nutrition and
    exercise habits cannot expect their children to
    eat healthy foods and exercise daily.

18
Childrens Nutrition Rights
  • Children have the right not to go hungry or
    endure deprivation of healthy foods.
  • Children have the right to choose among healthy
    foods available.
  • Children have the right to eat according to their
    hunger.
  • Children have the right to enjoy their favorite
    foods in moderation.

19
The influence of a parent or caregiver
  • It is tough for many parents or caregivers to
    be consistent.
  • For those parents or caregivers who did not have
    good parental role models themselves, the road
    ahead is even rockier.
  • It takes time to plan a healthy lifestyle.
  • It takes some monetary investment.
  • It takes sacrifice on the part of the parent or
    caregiver.

20
Parents or Caregivers Responsibilities
  • Learn about good nutrition.
  • Grocery shop for healthy foods.
  • Create a food environment that doesnt trigger
    unnecessary eating.
  • Prepare food wisely.
  • Emphasize mealtimes and provide appropriate
    snacks.

21
Parents or Caregivers Responsibilities
  • Make mealtimes pleasant
  • Model good behaviors
  • Do not use food to reward or punish-food is
    nourishment
  • Be flexible and understanding
  • Provide 3 meals (and healthy snacks when
    appropriate)
  • Provide a variety of foods try new foods
  • Parents need to be in agreement about the plan
    for healthy eating

22
The Parent or Caregiver Connection
  • Parents or caregivers need to be role models for
    how to eat healthfully and how to stay active.
  • When children see their parents or caregivers
    taking care of themselves, they tend to follow
    along.

23
Healthy Lifestyle Changes
  • Each of us can decide to make lifestyle changes
    that are healthy.
  • Women are often the leaders in their families in
    regard to the food choices that are made.
  • All parents or caregivers shape their familys
    health and nutrition behaviors.

24
A Family Approach to Improving Nutrition
  • Involve all family members, including parents,
    siblings, grandparents, and caregivers.
  • Try to educate those who care for the child,
    including day care providers, grandparents, and
    friends.

25
Which came first… Inactivity or Obesity?
  • It doesnt matter if a sedentary lifestyle and
    poor nutrition habits came first, or if the child
    is inactive because of the obesity.
  • The solution is to get moving.

26
Fabulous Exercise Facts
  • When combined with a healthy diet, exercise is
    the most effective method of weight control.
  • Burns extra calories while a person is
    exercising.
  • Increases metabolism, even after exercising.
  • Builds muscle (maintains lean body mass) which
    burns calories more efficiently than fat.

27
Fabulous Exercise Facts
  • Exercise decreases body fat.
  • It improves physical fitness.
  • It takes ones mind off eating.
  • It may be easier to change a childs exercise
    habits than to change food habits.
  • Exercise decreases stress.
  • It increases self esteem.

28
Fabulous Exercise Facts
  • Exercise increases social contacts and improves
    social skills (organized sports).
  • Combats boredom.
  • Learning how to have fun with exercise helps to
    develop lifelong healthy habits.
  • It allows parents to spend time with their
    children.

29
The Fitness Connection
  • Society as a whole must undergo a profound change
    to address problems created by obesity and lack
    of activity.
  • It is not only about food, and it is not only
    about activity. Its about both eating healthful
    foods and being active.

30
The Fitness Connection
  • Exercise is essential because muscle is the
    biggest tissue in the body.
  • Most people should work toward being moderately
    active for at least 60 minutes each day.
  • Be more physically active by incorporating short
    bursts of activity into daily routines.

31
Parents or Caregivers Be a good example!
  • Use hand weights when reading or watching
    television.
  • Take the steps instead of the elevator.
  • Take 3 ten-minute walks each day.
  • Deliver mail at work in person.
  • Park at the far end of the parking lot.
  • Return your grocery cart into the inside of the
    store, or at least put it back where it belongs.
  • Buy a pedometer aim for 10,000 steps per day.

32
How parents or caregivers can encourage exercise
  • Limit TV, video games and computer time. (2 hours
    per day in the summer and 1 hour per day during
    school time).
  • Use physical activity as a reward (fun family
    activities).
  • Include children in activities that parents
    enjoy.
  • Let your child win sometimes.
  • Learn to enjoy exercise.
  • Include physical activity in a vacation.

33
How parents and caregivers discourage exercise
  • Allow endless TV, video games and computer time.
  • Reward a child with TV.
  • Use TV as a babysitter.
  • Spending sunny, cool afternoons indoors.
  • Make fun of exercise.
  • Plan vacations that involve mostly driving,
    eating and sitting.

34
How parents and caregivers discourage exercise
  • Exercise by yourself. Dont include the kids.
  • Make remarks about how you cannot fit exercise
    into your already busy schedule.
  • Complain about how tired and sweaty you are after
    exercising.
  • Complain that you arent seeing results fast
    enough, and then quit being active.

35
Dispelling exercise myths
  • Exercising makes you eat more.
  • No pain, No gain.
  • Its useless to exercise if you cannot do it for
    30 minutes at any time.
  • Some just arent meant to be athletic.
  • Jogging a mile burns more calories than walking a
    mile.

36
Dispelling exercise myths
  • If you exercise, you can eat all you want.
  • You can reduce specific parts of your body by
    doing repetitions of exercises designed for those
    parts.

37
Marys Family Portrait
  • TV in a prominent place in family room.
  • On the coffee table chips, dip, empty soda cans,
    open container of peanuts.
  • Candy bowl on kitchen table, clear glass jar full
    of chocolate chip cookies on the counter.
  • Unwashed veggies in refrigerator, no fruit.
  • Snack wrappers, soda cans, TV, and computer in
    her room.

38
Anns Family Portrait
  • Bicycles, roller-blades and tennis rackets near
    the front door.
  • TV in the corner, exercise bike pointed towards
    the screen.
  • Bowl of fruit on the kitchen table.
  • A container of washed veggies for snacks in the
    refrigerator.
  • Room is a mess, but cant find food wrappers and
    sweetened beverage containers.

39
Which environment may contribute to overweight
children?
  • 1 Meals are served on time, everyone eats
    quickly, serving dishes are left on the table,
    conversation is not pleasant.
  • Rule You must clean your plate, no dessert if
    dinner not finished.

40
Which environment may contribute to over weight
children?
  • 2 Dinner is never at the same time or place
    it may be a sandwich in front of the TV at 500
    pm, a regular meal at 700 pm or cereal at 830
    pm. Snacks are available before and after
    dinner. Family may/may not eat together.

41
  • 3 Dinner served between 600 and 700 pm.
    Family eats together, conversation is pleasant.
    Occasionally a special TV program is watched, but
    the TV is off 95 of the time. Parents ask
    children their opinions on a topic of discussion.
    Meal prep and clean-up is shared. One rule a
    new food has to be at least tasted. If a food is
    disliked, a child does not have to eat all of it.

42
What is in your grocery cart?
  • Did anyone plan the meals?
  • Do you fly by the seat of your pants when it
    comes to meal planning?
  • Did you come home with fruit and vegetables?
  • Which do you have more of… chips and cookies, or
    fruit and veggies?

43
Whos in the kitchen?
  • Do any of the children help with cooking?
  • Are you teaching children to cook healthy foods,
    with low fat ingredients?
  • Does the cook make meals out of necessity or
    love?
  • Is there an avid baker in the house?

44
Nutrition Balancing Acts
  • Balance is about allowing children to eat enough
    of their favorite foods to be happy, but control
    high fat, high calorie foods in order to affect
    their weight in a healthy way.

45
Nutrition Balancing Acts
  • Balance high fat foods with low fat foods.
  • Balance empty calories with good nutrition.
  • Balance calories in with calories out.

46
Breakfast Tips
  • Select nutritious breakfasts that can be prepared
    in five minutes or less such as
  • Instant oatmeal or cold cereal with skim milk and
    fruit.
  • Lowfat muffin and fruit smoothie.
  • Toaster waffle topped with yogurt and or fruit.
  • Granola cereal mixed into fruited yogurt.
  • Peanut butter on toast or bagel with skim milk.

47
Eating Out
  • Is it a treat occasionally, or a frequent last
    minute choice?
  • What type of restaurants are chosen?
  • Do you eat out on days and nights when you are
    rushed to get somewhere else?
  • Do you order Biggie portions?

48
Life in the fast lane
49
Life in the fast lane
50
Best Bites at Fast Food Restaurants
  • Grilled chicken sandwiches w/mayo on the side,
    and a salad with dressing drizzled, not dumped.
  • Small spaghetti with meat sauce
  • Lean sub sandwiches 6 inches
  • Frozen yogurt cones small
  • Chili
  • Small hamburger and small fry
  • Thin crust vegetable or cheese pizza
  • Chicken or beef taco

51
Healthy Snacks
  • Wise vending machine choices 100 fruit juices,
    low fat milk, fruit, pretzels, baked chips,
    peanuts, Rice Krispie Treats.
  • Grab and Go Snack ideas String cheese, grapes,
    fruit cups, raisins, pretzels, granola bar, fruit
    juice, flavored milk, cereal bar, fresh fruit,
    light popcorn, peanut butter and celery.

52
School Lunches
  • Of the 21 meals a child eats per week, only 5 are
    at school.
  • Children who do not participate in the school
    lunch program have a threefold increase in sugar
    intake.
  • Look over the menu the night before and talk
    about healthy choices.
  • Pack a healthy lunch if they do not like the
    menu.
  • Ask them what they are eating at school.
  • Ask if they are buying extras.

53
Label Reading
  • Serving size Is this how much you are going to
    have?
  • Calories Amount of calories for the serving
    listed.
  • Fat Avoid saturated or trans fats. Realize that
    too much of even the healthy fat means too many
    calories.

54
Conclusions
  • Childhood obesity is on the rise and can cause
    health and self-esteem problems in children.
  • The whole family needs to be involved in a
    healthy lifestyle.
  • Balancing food intake with activity will help
    promote a healthy weight.

55
THANK YOU!
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