Guidelines%20for%20Good%20Nutrition - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Guidelines%20for%20Good%20Nutrition

Description:

Title: Guidelines for Good Nutrition Author: kgodbey Last modified by: Jenny Hester Created Date: 7/31/2007 9:28:11 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:143
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 21
Provided by: kgo81
Learn more at: http://www.swhs.warren.kyschools.us
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Guidelines%20for%20Good%20Nutrition


1
Guidelines for Good Nutrition
  • Unit 1
  • Nutrition 101

2
Dietary Guidelines
  • Aim for Fitness
  • Build a Healthy Base
  • Choose Sensibly

3
Aim for Fitness
  • Aim for a healthy weight
  • Be physically active each day

4
(No Transcript)
5
Build a Healthy Base
  • Let the ChooseMyPlate guide your food choices
  • Choose a variety of grains daily, especially
    whole grains
  • Choose a variety of fruits and vegetables daily
  • Keep food safe to eat

6
Choose Sensibly
  • Choose a diet that is low in saturated fat and
    cholesterol and moderate in total fat
  • Choose beverages and foods to moderate your
    intake of sugars
  • Choose and prepare foods with less salt

7
  • Section 3-3
  • Separating Fact from Fiction

8
Evaluating Advertisements
  • Limited information
  • Positive Images
  • Celebrity Endorsements
  • Appeal to basic needs
  • Scare tactics
  • False claims
  • Infomercials

9
Limited Information
  • Advertisements often give only the facts that
    will encourage you to buy without telling the
    whole story.

10
(No Transcript)
11
Positive Images
  • An ad may use images of things that people feel
    positively about, such as friendship or a good
    appearance.
  • The advertiser hopes that the consumer will
    associate those images and feelings with the
    product.

12
Celebrity Endorsement
  • Some ads show popular performers or athletes
    promoting the product. They dont tell you
    whether the person actually uses the product in
    real life.
  • Examples
  • Jessica Simpson and PROACTIV
  • Tiger Woods and NIKE

13
Can you think of anymore?
14
Appeal to basic needs
  • Advertisers may focus on ways the product meets a
    need for security or self-esteem.
  • They try to convince you that this product will
    make you look or feel better.

15
Scare tactics
  • Advertisers may play on peoples fears of aging
    or developing a medical condition by claiming
    that their product can prevent or relieve the
    symptoms or provide essential nutrients.

16
(No Transcript)
17
Infomercials
  • Infomercials are TV ads made to look like regular
    consumer programs or televised news reports.
    Unless you look carefully, you may believe your
    watching something youre not!

18
False Claims
  • Ads may make claims that are not true, such as
    fast or guaranteed results.
  • Remember, if a claim sounds too good to be true,
    it usually is.

19
Connecting Food with Social Studies
  • Teen Consumerism
  • The purpose of advertising is to sell, and
    todays teens are a target market. Think about
    the kinds of promotions that have inspired you
    to try a new product. A recent marketing and
    lifestyle study revealed the following buying
    habits in response to various promotions

AGE Promotion 12-15
16-17 18-19 Free Sample 48 47
38 Coupon 35 40
42 Contest/Sweepstakes 26 21
19 Free gift with purchase 25 21
20 Cash Rebate 11 10
11 Frequent-buyer clubs 6 8
9
20
Think About It
  • Be smart about what you buy to eat
  • Seek qualified opinion- Registered Dietician,
    Nutrition Expert or a health care professional
  • Remember, your health is your responsibility.
    Separating nutrition fact from fiction is an
    important part of exercising that responsibility.
About PowerShow.com