Redwood National Park - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Redwood National Park

Description:

The Klamath River, the largest in the North Coast region, ... The Smith River is also important for wildlife and has been named a Wild and Scenic River. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:663
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 18
Provided by: stude324
Learn more at: http://www.usd322.org
Category:
Tags: national | park | redwood

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Redwood National Park


1
Redwood National Park
Redwood National Park
Animals
Plants
History
Things To Do
Environmental Concerns
Natural Features Ecosystyems
2
Things To Do
  • Places To Go Outdoor Activities
  • Schedule of Events Backcountry

Campgrounds Nearby Attractions
Ranger-led programs Horseback Riding Bicycling Sce
nic Drives Other Activites
Guidelines Permits Northern Section Middle
Section Southern Section
There are no event scheduled at this time
HOME
3
Nearby Attractions
  • Crater Lake
  • Oregon Caves
  • Lassen Volcanic
  • Lave Beds
  • Unfortunately all these attractions are from 60
    to 230 miles away or 1 ½-5 hours

Back
4

Outdoor activities
  • Most of these activities are during the summer.
    There are many different activities to choose
    from for all ages so you can take your pick and
    have fun.
  • The rangers keep the activities fun so dont
    worry about getting bored.

Back
5
History
American Indians The native people of the North
Coast region have made the redwood forests and
associated ecosystems their home for thousands of
years. These American Indians spoke many
different languages and held numerous and
distinct identities. Today, the descendants of
these people continue to live on and off
reservations in the redwood region. American
Indians Today Over the passage of time, some
aspects of northwestern California Indian
cultures began to merge. Many customs, beliefs,
and ceremonies grew similar, but the languages
have remained distinct. Four of them Tolowa,
Yurok, Hupa, and Karuk are still living
languages, spoken yet by a handful of cherished
elders. Encouragingly, in a revival that is now
sweeping the entire area, these languages are
once again being learned by members of the
younger generation.
More
Home
6
  • LoggingWhen Euro-Americans swept westward in the
    1800s, they needed raw material for their homes
    and lives. Commercial logging followed the
    expansion of America as companies struggled to
    keep up with the furious pace of progress. Timber
    harvesting quickly became the top manufacturing
    industry in the west.
  • Save-the-Redwoods LeagueWhen redwood logging
    reached a fever pitch by the 1890s, most of the
    redwood forests had become privately owned.
    Though some people had previously proposed the
    idea of preservation, the huge demand for lumber
    in America made it impossible at the time.
  • Paleontologists Henry Fairfield Osborn of the
    American Museum of Natural History, Madison Grant
    of the New York Zoological Society, and John C.
    Merriam of the University of California at
    Berkeley founded the Save-the-Redwoods League in
    1918. The League was formed as a nonprofit
    organization dedicated to buying redwood tracts
    for preservation. Through donations and matching
    state funds, the League bought over 100,000 acres
    of redwood forest between 1920 and 1960.

Back
7
A variety of wildlife species call RNSP home. The
diversity of ecosystems in the parks means that
creatures as different as black bears, sea stars,
and bald eagles can be seen by a lucky visitor in
a single day. In addition to the more common
inhabitants, many threatened and endangered
species rely on the parks' old-growth forests,
open prairies, estuaries, and the coastline for
crucial havens of survival. Marine mammals such
as sea lions and gray whales are among the most
visible wildlife in the parks. Visitors are also
likely to see Roosevelt elk browsing in the
prairies. Pelicans, ospreys, and gulls are
frequently spotted along the coast. Of course,
tide pool creatures aren't likely to run very far
at your approach, so anemones and crabs are easy
to spot too.
Home
8
Plants
At RNSP, visitors often come just to see the
redwoods. They are the world's tallest trees, but
they are also just one species in an incredibly
varied ecosystem. From the wind-pruned,
salt-tolerant Sitka spruce by the seaside, to the
cool, moist redwood groves, and sunny, open
grasslands of the prairies, visitors can find an
interconnected community of greenery. In this
narrow zone where land meets sea, salt-laden
winds, cold fog-shrouded days, steep slopes, and
sandy beaches conspire against plants. The
protected valleys and alluvial flats found along
streams and creeks provide ideal growing
conditions for the coast redwood, with many trees
exceeding 300 feet in height. Other trees include
hardwoods such as big-leaf maple, California bay
(laurel), and red alder. Sword fern and redwood
sorrel are the most common members of redwoods'
understory.
  • At RNSP, visitors often come just to see the
    redwoods. They are the world's tallest trees, but
    they are also just one species in an incredibly
    varied ecosystem. From the wind-pruned,
    salt-tolerant Sitka spruce by the seaside, to the
    cool, moist redwood groves, and sunny, open
    grasslands of the prairies, visitors can find an
    interconnected community of greenery. In this
    narrow zone where land meets sea, salt-laden
    winds, cold fog-shrouded days, steep slopes, and
    sandy beaches conspire against plants.
  • The protected valleys and alluvial flats found
    along streams and creeks provide ideal growing
    conditions for the coast redwood, with many trees
    exceeding 300 feet in height. Other trees include
    hardwoods such as big-leaf maple, California bay
    (laurel), and red alder. Sword fern and redwood
    sorrel are the most common members of redwoods'
    understory.

Back
9
Environmental Concerns
  • Restoration work along Redwood Creek includes the
    removal of several miles of abandoned and eroding
    logging roads. These roads are remnants of the
    logging and road building that happened before
    the parks' establishment. The primary goals are
    to restore stream channels and hillslopes to the
    natural conditions that existed prior to road
    construction. These goals are accomplished by
    clearing stream channels choked with road fill
    and logging debris, recontouring hillslopes
    marred by road networks, and reestablishing
    natural drainage patterns. In achieving these
    goals, the unnaturally high erosion and
    sedimentation rates in Redwood Creek will be
    reduced and a solid foundation will be recreated
    for the protection and reestablishment of a
    healthy ecosystem.

More
10
  • Decaying and undersized culverts on existing
    roads are being replaced and roads over streams
    modified to control erosion. These measures
    reduce sedimentation from previously logged lands
    and associated roads, sediment that is harmful to
    salmon survival in Redwood Creek and its
    tributaries.
  • Placement of large in-stream wood structures,
    removal and modification of unnatural fish
    barriers, re-establishment of streamside
    vegetation, and modification of existing flood
    control levees are also improving fish habitat.
    Other measures that benefit salmonids are the
    prioritization of roads slated for removal by
    risk failure (potential for erosion) and
    sensitive resources (number of fish species and
    their population size) and review of timber
    harvest plans adjacent to the park. Annual
    surveys in summer and winter are conducted to
    provide information on the status of salmon and
    steelhead. Two decades of monitoring juvenile
    salmonids in summer and fall in the Redwood Creek
    estuary has verified the prominent role of
    estuaries in the life cycle of chinook salmon and
    steelhead and the importance of small coastal
    estuaries in degraded watersheds. The park is
    proposing to restore the Redwood Creek estuary to
    a fully functioning ecosystem benefiting fish,
    wildlife, and the public.

More
11
  • During your travels through Redwood National and
    State Parks, you may notice trees and landscapes
    that have been charred by fire. Some burns
    happened due to lightning strikes, some from
    American Indian-ignited fires of the past, and
    some from park management using prescribed fire.
  • The American Indian method of managing plant
    communities with fire contributed to ecosystem
    health by clearing brush and encouraging new
    growth. However, management practices by
    Euro-Americans brought a century of fire
    suppression and altered landscapes.
  • Today, park resource managers are returning to
    the practice of using fire to maintain landscape
    health. It is the long-term goal for RNSP to
    restore park lands to the state that existed just
    prior to Euro-American contact and influence. By
    using prescribed fire on a regular basis, park
    managers have set the following goals for
    prairies and redwood forests

Home
12
Natural Features
  • Earthquakes
  • Studies have shown that the last great subduction
    zone earthquake took place 300 years ago.
    Intervals between such quakes are in the hundreds
    of years, so predicting the next one is
    difficult. But research suggests that eventually
    such a quake will occur. Disastrous effects are
    possible when visiting the redwood region. BE
    PREPARED! Watch for things falling
  • Rocks
  • Most of RNSP is underlain by rocks of the
    Franciscan asemblage, which is primarily composed
    of sandstones and mudstones. This rock unit is
    best seen along the coast from Enderts Beach to
    the mouth of Redwood Creek and in road cuts on
    the way to the Tall Trees Grove trailhead. Much
    of the Franciscan assemblage consists of rock
    that has been sheared and lifted from the ocean
    floor as a result of the plate action along the
    Cascadia subduction zone.

Back
More
Pictures
13
N E X T Back
14
  • Tsunamis
  • Tsunamis have killed in the past. They are always
    a possible threat in the seismically active North
    Coast region, however, destructive tsunamis are
    rare and shouldn't ruin your visit to the beach
  • Rivers
  • The three large river systems within the park
    the Smith River, the Klamath River, and Redwood
    Creek  have cut deep gorges through the forest
    and mountainous terrain. Redwood Creek follows
    the Grogan Fault northwest, with many small
    tributaries. The Klamath River, the largest in
    the North Coast region, provides important
    habitat for wildlife along its banks and in its
    estuary. The Smith River is also important for
    wildlife and has been named a Wild and Scenic
    River.

Back
More
Pictures
15
Next Back
16
  • Ocean
  • Tides rise and fall twice daily on a 25-hour
    lunar cycle. In the zone between high and low
    tide, life forms arrange themselves vertically.
    Just where depends on their tolerance for
    exposure to air and/or water and to heat and wave
    shock. Other biological limits apply, too, such
    as predators and competing organisms.
  • Prairies
  • Unbeknownst to many visitors to RNSP are the
    parks' prairies, grasslands that provide
    important habitat for elk, black-tailed deer, and
    other inhabitants of the biological community.
    Today, park staff is using fire to maintain the
    oak woodlands, grasses, and other native plants
    found in this diminishing natural community. Fire
    not only helps preserve the natural values of
    these grassy expanses, but the cultural values as
    well. Values represented by the historic barns,
    relict stands of oak, and the openness of the
    land itself.

Home
Back
Pictures
17
H O M E
About PowerShow.com