Science Project Reaction Time - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Science Project Reaction Time

Description:

Science Project Reaction ... Activity as inquiry as more background to help with ... Human Reaction Time to a Stimulus stimulus response response time motor neurons ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:320
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 30
Provided by: NewCentur8
Learn more at: http://science.dadeschools.net
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Science Project Reaction Time


1
Science ProjectReaction Time
Correlated to the Elementary Science,
Mathematics, Engineering, and Inventions Fair
Handbook
  • Division of Mathematics, Science, and Advanced
    Academics

2
Overview
  • Elementary Science Project Fair Resources
  • Hands-0n Inquiry Based Project Reaction Time!
  • A Science Fair Project TE Planning Form
  • A Science Fair Project Student Planning Form
  • A Science Fair Project Power Point Guide
  • A Science Fair Project Power Point Template

3
Guided InquiryReaction Time
  • Scientific Method
  • Do research on a topic
  • Identify a testable question
  • Form hypothesis
  • Design an experiment identify the variables,
    gather materials, write procedures
  • Conduct the experiment
  • Collect and record data
  • Analyze data/results
  • Draw conclusions make applications
  • Communicate the results

4
Step 1 Choose a Topic.
  • Get a notebook to record all information
    collected for your project.
  • Do research to learn as much as you can about the
    experiment topic.
  • Ask questions about your topic that you want to
    answer and make sure you can observe and measure
    data.
  • More research may be needed after you decide what
    to investigate in your experiment.
  • Try the library and the internet.
  • Cite your sources in the Bibliography.

5
Topic Human Reaction Time to a Stimulus
stimulus
response
Nervous System
sensory neurons
neurons
motor neurons
response time
6
What Does Reaction Time Involve?
  • Our body uses our 5 senses to recognize a change
    outside or inside the body called a stimulus.
    Special cells in the nervous system called
    neurons carry messages to and from the brain and
    spinal cord.
  • Sensory neurons detect a stimulus. Then
    additional
  • neurons carry the message to the spinal cord and
    brain. The brain interprets the information and
    decides on an action. The message is carried
    back to the motor neurons. They direct the
    muscles to carry out a response. All of this
    happens in a fraction of a second.
  • This is measured as reaction time.
  • T

7
(No Transcript)
8
Step 2 Ask a Question
  • Identify a question that
  • can be answered by
  • performing an experiment.
  • An experiment is a set of steps you follow to
    test a hypothesis.
  • This question will be the Problem Statement.

9
Problem Statement
  • Is the reaction time for your dominant hand
    faster, the same or slower than your nondominant
    hand?

10
Step 3 Make a Hypothesis
  • Look at the Problem Statement and identify the
    one factor that can be tested. This is the
    manipulated or independent variable.
  • Form an idea or educated prediction that can be
    tested by an experiment.
  • Write down your Hypothesis If . then (this)
    will happen.

11
Hypothesis
  • If the reaction time for both the dominant
    hand and nondominant hand are tested, then the
    reaction time will be faster for
  • the dominant hand.

12
Step 4 Plan the Investigation
  • Identify and record the factors that can affect
  • the results of the experiment under Variables.
  • 1. Independent/test
    (manipulated) variable or the
  • factor that is changed in
    the experiment.
  • (See previous Step 3.)
  • 2. Dependent/outcome (responding)
    variable or
  • the data to be collected during the
    experiment.
  • 3. Constant/Control variables or all
    the factors
  • to be kept the same in the
    experiment.

13
Variables
  • Constant Variables
  • Same ruler
  • Same drop and catch directions
  • Same partner
  • Same conversion chart
  • Manipulated Variable
  • Dominant hand
  • Nondominant hand
  • Responding Variable
  • Centimeter mark on ruler when caught
  • Reaction time in seconds

14
Step 4 Planning Continued
  • Write your procedures or the steps you will
  • follow in your experiment.
  • Each procedure step needs to be numbered.
  • Each step needs to begin with a verb.
  • These procedures will insure that all variables
    are kept the same (constant) or controlled except
    the one you are testing.
  • Figure out and collect the materials needed for
    the experiment.

15
Materials
  • 1 ruler with centimeter markings
  • two students to work as partners
  • Centimeters to Seconds Conversion Chart

16
Procedures
  1. Hold the ruler (partner 2) vertically with the 0
    cm end facing down while the other (partner 1)
    holds his or her thumb and pointer finger from
    his or her dominant hand at the bottom of the
    rulerready to catch the ruler when it is
    dropped.
  2. Drop the ruler without warning (partner 2) and
    partner 1 tries to catch it as quickly as
    possible with his/her dominant hand.
  3. Observe the centimeter mark on the ruler where
    the ruler was caught (use the mark closest to the
    bottom of the thumb). Record the number.
  4. Use the conversion chart to change the centimeter
    measurements to a specific time in seconds.
    Record the time.
  5. Repeat steps 1.-4. five more times and find the
    average.
  6. Repeat steps 1. 5. with your nondominant hand.
  7. Change partner roles and repeat steps 1. 6.

17
Step 5 Collect, Organize, and
Display Data
  • Start the experiment.
  • Observe and record the quantitative data (numbers
    or measurements) collected during the experiment
    on a data table.
  • Repeat the experiment three or more times to
    confirm results.
  • Take pictures during the experiment.
  • Graph your data from all trials. (Dry Mix)
  • Display under Data.
  • Restate your data in a narrative form under
    Results.

18
Data
Reaction Time in Seconds
Partner 1 Hands Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Trial 4 Trial 5 Average
Dominant .20 .235 .20 .24 .19 .21
Non Dominant .18 .21 225 225 175 .20
Partner 2 Hands Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Trial 4 Trial 5 Average
Dominant .225 .185 .195 .24 .19 .21
Non Dominant .22 .195 .17 .23 .165 .20
19
Data
20
Results
  • Data from the five trials shows that partner
    1s dominant hand an average reaction time of .21
    seconds and the nondominant hand an average
    reaction time of .20 seconds.
  • Data from the five trials shows that partner 2s
    dominant hand an average reaction time of .21
    seconds and the nondominant hand an average
    reaction time of .20 seconds.

21
Step 6 Drawing Conclusions
  • What was investigated? (Describe the problem
    statement.)
  • Restate your hypothesis, and tell if it was
  • supported (true) or not supported (false).
  • What were the major findings? (Explain your
    results.)

22
Conclusion
  • This purpose of this project was to
    investigate if the reaction time for a persons
    dominant hand is faster, the same or slower than
    the nondominant hand.
  • It was hypothesized that the dominant hand
    would be faster. The hypothesis was not
    supported. The major findings showed that the
    dominant hand was slower by an average of .01 of
    a second than the nondominant hand. However,
    since .01 of a second difference is so close, the
    results could be considered inconclusive.

23
Step 7 Making Applications
  • What recommendations do you have for further
    study and for improving the experiment?
  • Explain what you learned from your experiment
    that could be applied in real life.
  • List any new questions that your experiment lead
    you to ask that could be tested in a new
    investigation.

24
Application
  • The project may have been improved by compiling
    and reporting on a larger sample of the students
    reaction times. The data collected by each pair
    of students completing a project could be
    averaged together. If there are other classes
    doing the same project, their data could also be
    used in making a revised conclusion.
  • The findings from this investigation lead me to
    think that although hand domination affects a
    persons ability to do specialized activities
    such as writing my name, it doesnt always affect
    reaction time to a stimulus in my day-to-day
    life.
  • On average do boys and girls of the same age have
    the
  • reaction time is a new question that could be
    investigated.

25
Step 8 Abstract and Bibliography
  • Describe your purpose and hypothesis.
  • Briefly describe your procedure.
  • Describe and explain your results.
  • Explain your conclusion and state if your
    hypothesis was supported or not by the results.
    Give possible reasons.
  • Write about your projects applications.
  • List your bibliography of three or more sources.

26
Abstract
  • This purpose of this project was to investigate
    if the reaction time for a persons dominant hand
    is faster, the same or slower than the non
    -dominant hand. It was hypothesized that the
    dominant hand would be faster.
  • A partner and I alternated dropping a ruler with
    the other catching a ruler and observing the
    centimeter mark where the ruler was caught. A
    conversion chart was used to change the
    centimeter mark to seconds.
  • The results showed that the dominant hand was
    slower by an average of .01 of a second than the
    non-dominant hand. This did not support the
    hypothesis. However, since .01 of a second
    difference is so close, the results could also be
    considered inconclusive.
  • The project may have been improved by compiling
    and reporting on a larger sample of the students
    reaction times.
  • The findings from this investigation lead me to
    think that although hand domination affects a
    persons ability to do specialized activities
    such as writing my name it doesnt always affect
    reaction time to a stimulus in my day-to-day
    life.

27
Bibliography
  • Home Connections Act Fast! Science and
    Children. National Science Teachers Association,
    September 2003, pp. 53 54
  • www.SciLinks.org Keyword Nervous System, code
    SC090302
  • Oracle Think Quest http//library.thinkquest.org/
    3007/nervous.html

28
Communicate Your Inquiry
  • You can use the science fair blank template to
    create a Power Point presentation.
  • You can duplicate your Power Point presentation
    and display on a Science Fair Project Board.

29
Guided InquiryReaction Time
  • Scientific Method
  • Do research on a topic
  • Identify a testable question
  • Form hypothesis
  • Design an experiment identify the variables,
    gather materials, write procedures
  • Conduct the experiment
  • Collect and record data
  • Analyze data/results
  • Draw conclusions make applications
  • Communicate the results
About PowerShow.com