Discourse Communities - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Discourse Communities PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 729c6d-ZmIyY



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Discourse Communities

Description:

Discourse Communities Swales (1990) common goals (Sw1) common language – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:223
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 220
Provided by: Bertr158
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Discourse Communities


1
Discourse Communities
  • Swales (1990)
  • common goals (Sw1)
  • common language

2
characteristic genres (Sw2)
3
specific lexis (Sw3)
  • communication practices

4
mechanisms for intercommunication (Sw4)
5
information feedback (Sw5)
6
threshold level of members (Sw6)
  • Gee Discourses

7
J. Gee, "What is literacy?", 1987, p. 1 By "a
discourse" I will mean a socially accepted
association among ways of using language, of
thinking, and of acting that can be used to
identify oneself as a member of a socially
meaningful group or "social network". Think of a
discourse as an "identity kit" which comes
complete with the appropriate costume and
instructions on how to act and talk so as to take
on a particular role that others will recognize.
8
J. Gee, l990, p. 143 A Discourse is a socially
accepted association among ways of using
language, of thinking, feeling, believing,
valuing, and of acting that can be used to
identify oneself as a member of a socially
meaningful group or 'social network', or to
signal (that one is playing a socially meaningful
role.
9
literacy control over secondary Discourse
  • Community Definition
  • 1. Common ways of talking and acting--identity
    kit

10
a. representational devices (vocabulary--Sw2)
11
b. ways of acting (genres, forms--St4, Sw3)
12
c. physical objects (St1)
13
d. interpretive strategies (personal
appearance--Gee)
  • 2. Characteristic participation structures

14
a. Communication channels (two-way)
15
b. Activity structures
16
c. Dialogue function
17
d. Locus of expertise
18
e. Power relations
  • Implications

19
roles
20
communication patterns (IRE)
21
silences
  • 3. Common ideology

22
a. Beliefs (Gee)
23
b. Knowledge status
24
c. Diversity of beliefs
25
d. Values (standards) (Gee)
26
e. Purpose (Sw1)
  • Boundary objects (Star, 1989)
  • repositories (St1)
  • ideal types, e.g., species (St2Sw3)
  • coincident boundaries (St3)
  • standardized forms (St4Sw2)
  • Exclusion/inclusion (Gee, 1989)
  • gt resistant to internal criticism--centripetal
    (G2)
  • gt defined in opposition to other
    discourses--centrifugal (G3)
  • gt certain concepts, values, viewpoints at
    expense of other marginalize other viewpoints
    (G4)
  • related to distribution of social power
    hierarchy (G5)
  • no outside discourse position
  • inherently ideological set of values about
    relationships between people and the distribution
    of social goods (money, power, status)

27
  • Theory of splitting (Star, "onions", 1991)

28
multiple membership--simultaneously in and out
(Hubbard Randall, Shape of red)
29
maintaining the high tension zone
30
cost of membership in multiple areas
31
multivocality and translation
  • Other Discourse Issues
  • Analysis of new technology

32
  • Evolution of discourse communities
  • How individuals enter into
  • Linguistic Utopias

33
Mary Louise Pratt, The linguistics of writing
  • Verbal practices associated with women (connected
    to powerlessness or domestic sphere)

34
Planting suggestions in the minds of other people
so that they think they thought of it themselves
35
Speaking to one person in such a way that another
might hear and be affected in the desired fashion
36
In academic writing, gradually building up
evidence toward the main point rather than
stating it at the beginning and then backing it up
37
Storytelling as a way of communicating values (to
children, for example)
38
Gossip as a means of supporting and surveilling
each other, and as a form of power over men, who
fear this secret network
39
Talking often repetitively with one another for
the purpose of maintaining a shared world (small
talk)
40
Talking to subjects who dont know language at
all (babies, animals, plants, TV sets, the walls)
  • marginalization of speech forms associated with
    women and womens spheres
  • imagined ocmmunity
  • Discourse Theory Challenges

41
(No Transcript)
42
Inner
43
Outer
44
Knowledge
45
Epistemology Rhetoric
46
Social Relations
47
Community Ideology
  • Scollons Learning as Cultural Crisis

48
(No Transcript)
49
  • Pedagogical Responses

50
(No Transcript)
51
Inner
52
Outer
53
Knowledge
54
Meaningful goals Context of Criticism
55
Social Relations
56
Legitimate Peripheral Participation
57
Recognition of contention
58
(No Transcript)
59
  • Responses to Challenges
  • Meaningful goals
  • Empowerment through critique

60
Gee resistant, meta-level, Mushfake
61
Wineburg study
62
Engstrom context of criticism
63
Boomer radical v progressive teaching
64
Rethinking Columbus
  • Learning communities

65
Lave Wenger LPP
66
Gabelnick et al college models
67
Graff canon debate into curriculum
  • Recognition of contention

68
culturally-appropriate practices Tharp
Gallimore Mason Au Moll
69
Delpit criticism
70
not reducing difference to mismatch
71
(No Transcript)
72
  • Questions about Learning Communities

73
(No Transcript)
74
How can we understand individual learning in a
social context?
75
What role does/could/should community play in
learning?
76
How can we make educational discourse communities
into more effective learning communities?
  • Learning Community Charts

77
(No Transcript)
78
Participation Structures
79
(No Transcript)
80
(No Transcript)
81
(No Transcript)
82
Model
83
(No Transcript)
84
(No Transcript)
85
(No Transcript)
86
Activity structure
87
(No Transcript)
88
(No Transcript)
89
Dialogue
90
function
91
(No Transcript)
92
(No Transcript)
93
Locus of expertise
94
(No Transcript)
95
(No Transcript)
96
Power
97
relations
98
(No Transcript)
99
(No Transcript)
100
(No Transcript)
101
(No Transcript)
102
Ideology
103
(No Transcript)
104
(No Transcript)
105
Model
106
(No Transcript)
107
(No Transcript)
108
(No Transcript)
109
Knowledge
110
status
111
(No Transcript)
112
(No Transcript)
113
Diversity
114
of beliefs
115
(No Transcript)
116
(No Transcript)
117
Values
118
(standards)
119
(No Transcript)
120
(No Transcript)
121
Purpose
122
(No Transcript)
123
(No Transcript)
124
(No Transcript)
125
(No Transcript)
126
Standard Teaching
127
(No Transcript)
128
(No Transcript)
129
(No Transcript)
130
temporal
131
standard sequence
132
(No Transcript)
133
(No Transcript)
134
to transmit knowledge
135
(No Transcript)
136
(No Transcript)
137
value asymmetry
138
(No Transcript)
139
(No Transcript)
140
(No Transcript)
141
monotonic asymmetry
142
seek complete
143
(No Transcript)
144
(No Transcript)
145
Standard Teaching
146
(No Transcript)
147
(No Transcript)
148
(No Transcript)
149
pre-established
150
(No Transcript)
151
(No Transcript)
152
(No Transcript)
153
heterodoxy -gt orthodoxy
154
(No Transcript)
155
(No Transcript)
156
pre-set global
157
(No Transcript)
158
(No Transcript)
159
(No Transcript)
160
learning as explicit goal--thematized cognitive
emphasis
161
(No Transcript)
162
(No Transcript)
163
Learning Community
164
(No Transcript)
165
(No Transcript)
166
spatial
167
heterarchical
168
(No Transcript)
169
(No Transcript)
170
process of learning
171
(No Transcript)
172
(No Transcript)
173
(No Transcript)
174
recognize difference
175
seek balance
176
(No Transcript)
177
(No Transcript)
178
value complementarity
179
expect limits
180
(No Transcript)
181
(No Transcript)
182
Learning Community
183
(No Transcript)
184
(No Transcript)
185
socially constructed
186
(No Transcript)
187
(No Transcript)
188
(No Transcript)
189
heterodoxy orthodoxy
190
(No Transcript)
191
(No Transcript)
192
emergent local
193
(No Transcript)
194
(No Transcript)
195
(No Transcript)
196
learning incidental
197
affective holistic
198
(No Transcript)
199
(No Transcript)
200
  • Standard teaching model

201
(2/3 rule)
  • Participation Structure

202
Organization time segmented sequenced
203
Dialogue to transmit knowldege
204
Expertise assume monotonic asymmetry seek
complete
205
Power value asymmetry
  • Ideology

206
Knowledge status pre-established
207
Diversity of beliefs heterodoxy -gt orthodoxy
208
Values (standards) pre-set global
209
Purpose learning as explicit goal thematized
cognitive emphasis
  • Learning community model
  • Participation Structure

210
Activity structure spatial heterarchical
211
Dialogue function process of learning
212
Locus of expertise value complementarity
expect limits
213
Power relations recognize difference seek
balance
  • Ideology

214
Knowledge status socially constructed
215
Diversity of beliefs heterodoxy orthodoxy
216
Values (standards) emergent local
217
Purpose learning incidental affective holistic
218
(No Transcript)
219
(No Transcript)
About PowerShow.com