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The Other Ride of Paul Revere: Brokerage Role in the Making of the American Revolution

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Title: The Other Ride of Paul Revere: Brokerage Role in the Making of the American Revolution


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The Other Ride of Paul RevereBrokerage Rolein
the Making of the American Revolution
  • Shin-Kap Han

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The Other Ride of Paul RevereBrokerage Rolein
the Making of the American Revolution
  1. Question
  2. Issues Historical and Sociological
  3. Data Membership Networks
  4. Findings
  5. Summary and Conclusion

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Folklore vs. History
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Midnight Ride of Paul Revere (1931) by Grant
WoodMetropolitan Museum of Art, New York
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Folklore vs. History
  • (???)
  • an uncanny genius for being at the center of
    events
  • (Fischer 1994)

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Sociological Framing
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Sociological Framing
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The Black Box
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A Historiographical Blind Spot?A Sociological
Black Box?
  • What was his real importance?
  • What was the nature of the role he played?

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The Other Ride
  • Reveres role in the mobilization process of the
    Revolutionary movement from a social structural
    perspective

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The Other Ride
  • Reveres role in the mobilization process of the
    Revolutionary movement from a social structural
    perspective
  • Spanned various social chasms and connected
    disparate organizational elements
  • A bridge par excellence across the structural
    holes

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The Mechanism
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IssuesBrokerage
  • A process by which intermediary actors
    facilitate transactions between other actors
    lacking access to or trust in one another
    (Marsden 1982)

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Issues Incentives in Brokerage
  • Commissions (Marsden)
  • Tertius Gaudens (Burt)
  • Tariff (Boissevain)
  • ? His was pro bono.

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Issues Incentives in Brokerage
  • Commissions (Marsden)
  • Tertius Gaudens (Burt)
  • Tariff (Boissevain)
  • ? His was pro bono.
  • Interest in keeping the holes from being closed
    up
  • ? He filled the holes.

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Issues Incentives in Brokerage
  • Commissions (Marsden)
  • Tertius Gaudens (Burt)
  • Tariff (Boissevain)
  • ? His was pro bono.
  • Interest in keeping the holes from being closed
    up
  • ? He filled the holes.

Competitive Setting
Non-Competitive Setting
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IssuesBrokerage and Mobilization
  • A process by which intermediary actors
    facilitate transactions between other actors
    lacking access to or trust in one another
    (Marsden 1982)
  • bridge-and-cluster structure
  • weakly coupled structure

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Issues Brokerage and Mobilization
  • Structural problems inherent in any large-scale
    mobilization process ? Mobilizing men of all
    orders
  • Levels multiorganizational fields (i.e.,
    networks of organizations)
  • Multiplexity overlaps and intersections

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Issues Brokerage and Mobilization
  • Structural problems inherent in any large-scale
    mobilization process ? Mobilizing men of all
    orders
  • Levels multiorganizational fields (i.e.,
    networks of organizations)
  • Multiplexity overlaps and intersections

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Issues Brokerage and Mobilization
  • Structural problems inherent in any large-scale
    mobilization process ? Mobilizing men of all
    orders
  • Levels multiorganizational fields (i.e.,
    networks of organizations)
  • Multiplexity overlaps and intersections

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IssuesLate 18th Century British American
Colonies
  • Fault lines
  • Tories, true blue, and the timid
  • The better sort and the lower sort
  • Militia and crowd
  • Organizational infrastructure Diffuse alliances
  • In the middle of it all was Revere, as a
    communicator, coordinator, and organizer.

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IssuesLate 18th Century British American
Colonies
  • Fault lines
  • Tories, true blue, and the timid
  • The better sort and the lower sort
  • Militia and crowd
  • Organizational infrastructure Diffuse alliances
  • In the middle of it all was Revere, as a
    communicator, coordinator, and organizer.

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IssuesLate 18th Century British American
Colonies
  • Fault lines
  • Tories, true blue, and the timid
  • The better sort and the lower sort
  • Militia and crowd
  • Organizational infrastructure Diffuse alliances
  • In the middle of it all was Revere, as a
    communicator, coordinator, and organizer.

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Data
(1994. Oxford University Press)
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Membership List of Five Whig Groups
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2-Mode (Affiliation) Network Data
Matrix Operations A (P-by-G) AT (G-by-P) A(AT)
P-by-P AT(A) G-by-G
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Findings, I
  • Linkages Between Organizations and Their Members

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Findings, II
  • Reveres Place

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Distribution of Centrality Scores
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Network Structure of the Revolutionary Movement
in Boston All (Density .725)
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Network Structure of the Revolutionary Movement
in Boston All (Density .725)
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Network Structure of the Revolutionary Movement
in Boston W/O 2 (D .500)
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Changes () in Average Path Distance
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Findings, III
  • Linkages Across Social Divides

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Membership Characteristics
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Membership Characteristics
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Membership Characteristics
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Membership Characteristics
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Membership Characteristics
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Membership Characteristics
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Changing of the Guards
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Summary and Conclusion
  • Reveres importance was in his being an
    extraordinarily effective bridge, chiefly due to
    its high multiplexity and the unique ways in
    which it was embedded in the social and
    organizational setting of the 18th-century New
    England.

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Where to go from here?
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Where to go from here?
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To Harness an OutbreakA Microstructural Account
of Mobilizationfor the March First Movement
  • On March 1, 1919, the tenth year of Japanese
    occupation of Korea, the largest mass movement in
    Korean history began For a period of two months,
    more than two million Koreans directly
    participated in more than 1,500 separate
    gatherings all across the country, shouting Long
    Live Korean Independence!

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To Harness an OutbreakA Microstructural Account
of Mobilizationfor the March First Movement
  • Under the harsh colonial rule of imperial Japan
    the nationalistic spirit of resistance had grown
    and spread to all segments of Korean society and
    had almost reached the point of explosion.
  • ?An inevitable outbreak?

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The Other Ride of Paul RevereBrokerage Rolein
the Making of the American Revolution
  1. Question
  2. Issues Historical and Sociological
  3. Data Membership Networks
  4. Findings
  5. Summary and Conclusion

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The Other Ride of Paul RevereBrokerage Rolein
the Making of the American Revolution
  • Shin-Kap Han
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