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DENTAL SURVEYOR The tool for perfect planning of Removable Partial Denture

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DENTAL SURVEYOR The tool for perfect planning of Removable Partial Denture Dalhousie continual education McCracken s Removable Prosthodontics, 11th Edition – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: DENTAL SURVEYOR The tool for perfect planning of Removable Partial Denture


1
DENTAL SURVEYOR The tool for perfect planning of
Removable Partial Denture
  • Dalhousie continual education
  • McCrackens Removable Prosthodontics, 11th
    Edition

2
Lecture Outline
  • Description of Dental Surveyor
  • Purposes of Surveyor
  • Discussing some related terms
  • Factors That Determine Path of Placement and
    Removal
  • Guiding Planes
  • Retentive Areas
  • Interference
  • Esthetics
  • Step-by-Step Procedures in Surveying
    Diagnostic Cast
  • Recording Relation of Cast to Surveyor

3
Definition An instrument used to determine the
relative parallelism of two or more surfaces of
the teeth or other parts of the cast of a dental
arch.
4
Purposes of Surveying the Diagnostic Cast
  • 1. To determine the most desirable path of
    placement that will eliminate or minimize
    interference to placement and removal
  • 2. To identify proximal tooth surfaces that are,
    or need to be, made parallel so that they act as
    guiding planes during placement and removal.
  • 3. To locate and measure areas of the teeth that
    may be used for retention.

5
Purposes of Surveying the Diagnostic Cast
  • 4. To determine whether tooth and bony areas of
    interference will need to be eliminated
    surgically or by selecting a different path of
    placement.
  • 5. To determine the most suitable path of
    placemen that will permit locating retainers and
    artificial teeth to the best esthetic advantage.
  • 6. To permit an accurate charting of the mouth
    preparation to be made

6
Purposes of Surveying the Diagnostic Cast
  • 7. To delineate the height of contour on abutment
  • teeth and to locate areas of undesirable tooth
  • undercut that are to be avoided, eliminated, or
    blocked out.
  • 8. To record the cast position in relation to the
    selected path of placement for future reference.

7

Some Important Terms
8
  • Height of Contour Undercut

9
Height of Contour (HOC)
  • A line encircling a tooth, designating its
    greatest circumference at a selected position
    determined by a dental surveyor.

10
  • Height of contour

11
  • Any areas cervical to HOC used for placement of
    retentive clasp components
  • Areas occlusal to the HOC used for the placement
    of nonretentive, stabilizing, or reciprocating
    components.

12
Non-undercut Area
Undercut here
13
Types of undercuts
Tooth Undercuts
Soft Tissues or bony Undercuts(on lingual side of
ridge)
14
Angle of Cervical Convergence
  • An angle viewed between a vertical rod
    contacting an abutment tooth and the axial
    surface of the abutment cervical to the height of
    contour.

15
Direct Retainers
Buccal
  • Retention
  • Composed of
  • rest
  • retentive element
  • reciprocal (bracing) element
  • minor connector

Lingual
16
Rule Retentive tip should usually be designed to
be placed in the gingival 1/3
17
  • Path of Insertion Removal

18
Path of Insertion
  • Path that the prosthesis is
  • Placed/removed
  • Usually a single path

19
Path of Insertion (P.I)
The Direction in Which a Restoration/ Prosthesis
Moves From the Point of Initial Contact With the
Supporting Teeth to the Terminal Resting Position
Where the Occlusal Rests Are Seated and the
Denture Base Is in Contact With the Tissue
Path of Removal (P.R) Reverse of the
Path of Insertion
20
Advantages of a Single Path of Insertion
  • Equalizes retention

21
Advantages of a Single Path of Insertion
  • Bracing and Cross-arch Stabilization

22
Advantages of a Single Path of Insertion
  • Minimizes torque on abutments

23
Advantages of a Single Path of Insertion
  • Allows removal without encountering interferences

24
Advantages of a Single Path of Insertion
  • Directs forces along long axes of teeth

25
Advantages of a Single Path of Insertion
  • Provides frictional retention

26
Factors Determining Path of Insertion Removal
  • Guiding planes
  • Retentive areas
  • Interference
  • Esthetics

27
Guiding Planes
  • Two or more vertically parallel flat surfaces of
    abutment teeth shaped to direct a prosthesis
    during
  • placement and removal

28
Guiding Planes
  • Where rigid components contact abutments

29
Effects of Guiding Planes on Retention Stability
  • Maintains Retention

30
Effects of Guiding Planes On Retention Stability
  • Minimizes Need for Retention

31
Guiding Planes Functions
  • to ensure passage of the rigid parts of
    prosthesis past existing areas of interference.
  • to control limit directions of movement of RPD
    as it is being inserted, removed or while in
    function.
  • to ensure predictable clasp assembly function,
    including retention and stabilization

32
Effectiveness of Guiding Planes
  • Most effective when
  • Parallel to each other
  • More than one common axial surface

33
Effectiveness of Guideplanes
  • Most effective when
  • Directly opposing each other

34
Effectiveness of Guideplanes
  • Most effective when
  • Prepared on several teeth
  • Cover a large surface area (proximal lingual)

35
Prep. Of Guiding Planes
Prepare Guiding Planes First
36
Use Finger Rest
37
Burs
8837K-014
  • Long Cylindrical Carbide or Diamond (8837K 014)

38
Guiding Plane Dimensions
39
Guiding Plane Dimensions
40
Polish Prepared Surfaces
  • Rubber wheels or points

41
If Axial Surface Already Parallel to Path of
Insertion?
  • NO Preparation !

42
  • Retentive Areas

43
Retentive Areas
  • Retentive arm should have a different path of
    escapement than guiding plane (path of removal),
    so retentive arm must be forced to flex over a
    convex surface during placement and removal
    (retention)

44
Optimal Path of Insertion
  • Retentive undercuts equalized
  • Ideally, retentive arms should oppose each other
    on opposite sides of the arch with fairly even
    retention

45
Retentive Areas
  • To obtain fairly even retention
  • --change the path of placement to increase or
    decrease the angle of cervical convergence of
    opposing retentive surfaces of abutment teeth.
  • OR
  • --alter flexibility of retentive clasp arm

46
Optimal Path of Insertion (Interference)
  • Prosthesis must be designed so that it may be
    placed and removed without encountering tooth or
    soft tissue interference

47
Interference
  • Bony prominences and lingually inclined premolar
    teeth are the most common causes of interference
    to a lingual bar connector

48
Interference
  • If the interference is bilateral, surgery or
    recontouring of lingual tooth surfaces, or both,
    may be unavoidable.
  • If it is only unilateral, a change in the
    lateral tilt may prevent an area of tooth or
    tissue interference.

49
Interference
  • Bony undercuts
  • to remove them surgically
  • to change the path of placement at the expense of
    modifying or restoring teeth to achieve guiding
    planes and retention
  • to design denture bases to prevent such undercut
    areas.

50
Interference
  • Generally, interference that cannot be eliminated
    for one reason or another will take precedence
    over the factors of retention and guiding planes.

51
Optimal Path of Insertion (Esthetics)
  • Esthetics
  • Minimize display of clasps, metal components

52
Esthetics
  • Esthetics dictates the choice of path selected
    only when missing anterior teeth must be replaced
    with RPD

53
Parts of a Dental Surveyor
B-Vertical Upright Column C-Cross Arm with
Spindle Housing D-The Vertical Spindle With Tool
Holder E- Screw To Lock The Spindle F- Tool
adaptor Holder G- Surveying tool holder J- Model
Clamp K- Model table lock nut L- Model rotating
ball socket M- Ball rotating ring N- Tool
Rack O- Storage Compartment P- Model lock nut
54
Parts of a Surveyor
  • Surveying Table

55
Parts of a Surveyor
  • Surveying Arm

56
Surveying Tools
1- Analyzing Rods
2- Carbon Marker
3- Undercut Gauge
4- Wax Trimmer
57
Parts of a Surveyor
  • Surveying Tools
  • Analyzing Rod

58
Analyzing Rod
59
Surveying Tools
1- Analyzing Rods
2- Carbon Marker
3- Undercut Gauge
4- Wax Trimmer
60
Parts of a Surveyor
  • Surveying Tools
  • Carbon Markers

61
Carbon Marker
62
Parts of a Surveyor
  • Surveying Tools
  • Undercut Gauges

63
Undercut Gauge
64
Undercut Gauges
65
Undercut Gauges
66
Undercut Gauge
67
Parts of a Surveyor
  • Surveying Tools
  • Wax Trimmer

68
Wax Trimmer
69
Dental Surveyor
Ney Surveyor
Jelenko Surveyor
70
PROCEDURES of SURVEYING DIAGNOSTIC CAST
1- Placement of the Cast
2- Altering the Cast Position Anteroposteriorly
To Provide Parallel Proximal Surfaces That
May Act As Guiding Planes
3- Tilt the Cast Laterally Until Equal
Retentive Areas Exist on the Principal Abutments
4- Eliminate Areas of Interference
5- Permits a More Esthetic Placement of Clasp
Arms Than the Other.
71
1- Placement of the Cast
  • Position the adjustable
  • table so that the occlusal surfaces of the
    teeth are
  • approximately parallel to the platform

72
  • 2. Altering the Cast Position Anteroposteriorly
    To Provide Parallel Proximal Surfaces That May
    Act As Guiding Planes

73
3- Tilt the Cast Laterally Until Equal
Retentive Areas Exist on the Principal Abutments
  • By contacting buccal and lingual surfaces of
    abutment teeth with the surveyor blade, the
    amount of retention existing below their height
    of convexity may be determined.

74
The Location of the Undercut Area Can Be Changed
by Changing the Tilting
75
B
Cast at zero tilt. Creation of undercut
by tilting cast
D
Without guiding planes, Clasps designed are
ineffective when restoration is subject to
dislodging forces in occlusal direction.
76
4- Eliminate Areas of Interference by Reshaping
Tooth Surfaces, Surgery, Block-out, Restoration,
or Change in lateral Tilt if Unilateral
Interference
77
5- Permits a More Esthetic Placement of Clasp
Arms Than the Other.
78
A Cast in a Tilted Relationship Represents a Path
of Placement Toward the Side of the Cast That Is
Tilted Upward
79
FINAL PATH OF PLACEMENT
  • The anteroposterior and lateral position of the
    cast, in relation to the vertical arm of the
    surveyor that best satisfies all four factors
    guiding planes, retention, interference, and
    esthetics.

80
Recording Relation of Cast to Surveyor
Tripoding is Performed While Cast is Still
Mounted on the Survey Table Without Changing the
Tilt to Preserve the Established Cast Tilt
81
Tripoding the Cast
82
  • All proposed mouth changes (prep. of proximal
    surfaces, reduction of buccal lingual
    surfaces, prep. of rest seats) should be
    indicated on the diagnostic cast in red pencil,
    with the exception of restorations to be done.

83
References
  • McCrackens Removable Prosthodontics, 11th
    Edition 2005 by McGivney GP, Carr AB. Chapter 11
    (Surveying)
  • Dalhousie continual education
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