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Shintoism

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Shintoism The heart of the person before you is a mirror. See there your own form . - A Shinto Saying – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Shintoism


1
Shintoism
The heart of the person before you is a mirror.
See there your own form. - A Shinto Saying
2
Origins
Shinto ("the way of the gods") is the
indigenous faith of the Japanese people and is
as old as Japan itself.
3
Origins
  • Therefore, Shinto has no founder or founding
    date. It is the indigenous religion of Japan.

4
Adherents
  • Worldwide, there are approximately 3-4 million
    followers of Shintoism.
  • These Shintoism followers are called Shinto.

5
Views
  • Shintoism is a polytheistic religion based on the
    kami, ancient gods or spirits.
  • Kami are sacred spirits which take the form of
    things and concepts important to life, such as
    wind, rain, mountains, trees, rivers and stones.

6
Some prominent rocks are worshiped as kami.
7
Views
  • Humans become kami after they die and are revered
    by their families as ancestral kami. The kami of
    extraordinary people are even enshrined at some
    shrines.
  • The Sun Goddess Amaterasu is considered Shinto's
    most important kami.

8
Views
  • Shinto shrines are the places of worship and the
    homes of kami.
  • Sacred objects of worship that represent the kami
    are stored in the innermost chamber of the shrine
    where they cannot be seen by anybody.
  • Most shrines celebrate festivals (matsuri)
    regularly in order to show the kami the outside
    world.

9
Ise Jingu is Shinto's most sacred shrine.
10
Tokyo's Meiji Shrine is dedicated to the spirits
of Emperor Meiji.
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12
Torii One or more torii gates mark the approach
and entrance to a shrine. They come in various
colors and are made of various materials. Most
torii, however are made of wood, and many are
painted orange and black.
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16
General Practices
  • In Shinto, there is no absolute right and wrong,
    and nobody is perfect.
  • Shinto is an optimistic faith, as humans are
    thought to be fundamentally good, and evil is
    believed to be caused by evil spirits.
  • Consequently, the purpose of most Shinto rituals
    is to keep away evil spirits by purification,
    prayers and offerings to the kami.

17
General Practices
  • People visit shrines in order to worship, pay
    respect to the kami by making offerings or to
    pray for good fortune.
  • People also participate in purification rituals.

18
At the purification fountain near the shrine's
entrance, take one of the ladles provided, fill
it with fresh water and rinse both hands. Then
transfer some water into your cupped hand, rinse
your mouth and spit the water beside the
fountain. You are not supposed to transfer the
water directly from the ladle into your mouth or
swallow the water.
19
At some temples, visitors burn incense (osenko)
in large incense burners. Purchase a bundle,
light them, let them burn for a few seconds and
then extinguish the flame by waving your hand
rather than by blowing it out. Finally, put the
incense into the incense burner and fan some
smoke towards yourself as the smoke is believed
to have healing power. For example, fan some
smoke towards your shoulder if you have an
injured shoulder.
20
General Practices
  • Shrines are also visited during special events
    and festivals such as New Year, setsubun, and
    shichigosan.

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22
A shimenawa is a straw rope with white zigzag
paper strips (gohei). It marks the boundary to
something sacred and can be found on torii gates,
around sacred trees and stones, etc. A rope
similar to the shimenawa is also worn by
yokozuna, the highest ranked Sumo Wrestlers,
during ritual ceremonies.
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25
Komainu are a pair of guardian dogs or lions,
often found on each side of a shrine's entrance.
In the case of Inari Shrines, they are foxes (see
picture) rather than dogs.
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29
Ema Shrine visitors write their wishes on these
wooden plates and then leave them at the shrine
in the hope that their wishes come true. Most
people wish for good health, success in business,
passing entrance exams, love or wealth.
30
Omikuji are fortune telling paper slips found at
many shrines and temples. Randomly drawn, they
contain predictions ranging from daikichi ("great
good luck") to daikyo ("great bad luck"). By
tying the piece of paper around a tree's branch,
good fortune will come true or bad fortune can be
averted.
31
Lifes Purpose
  • Humans are pure by nature and can keep away evil
    through purification rituals and attain good
    things by calling on the kami.

32
Afterlife
  • Death is bad and impure.
  • Some humans become kami after death.

33
Holy Text(s)
  • Shinto does not have any philosophical literature
    or official scripture that can be compared to
    texts like other religions.
  • But the Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters) and
    the Nihongi or Nihon shoki (Chronicles of Japan),
    are in a sense the sacred books of Shinto.
  • They were written in AD 712 and 720,
    respectively, and are compilations of the oral
    traditions, mythology and ceremonies of ancient
    Shinto.
  • But they are also books about the history,
    topography, and literature of ancient Japan.

34
  • Shinto Wedding Ceremony

35
  • Shinto Wedding Ceremony

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