Skillstreaming and Social Skills Deficits in the Schools - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Skillstreaming and Social Skills Deficits in the Schools

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Skillstreaming and Social Skills Deficits in the Schools By Laurie Stiga Yes! It did demonstrate an educational impact utilizing parent/teacher input. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Skillstreaming and Social Skills Deficits in the Schools


1
Skillstreaming and Social Skills Deficits in the
Schools
  • By Laurie Stiga

2
Social Skills Deficits in the Schools
  • Can the Skillstreaming program be implemented in
    the school setting to effectively assess and
    address the educational impact of reduced social
    skills in a reliable, organized and systematic
    way?

3
  • Is there a need to address social skills in
    the school setting?

4
Increased Number of Children with Reduced Social
Skills
  • Environmental reasons unemployment, family
    stress, divorce
  • Genetic and developmental reasons - increased
    rate of autism, learning disabilities

5
Inclusive Classes
  • Move towards inclusive settings.
  • Greater number of children with autism and
    learning disabilities are being taught in the
    regular classroom.
  • Supports in place will be helpful for teacher and
    student.

6
Reduced social skills may lead to
  • Reduced self-esteem
  • Decreased sense of belonging
  • Reduced sense of responsibility
  • Increased aggressive behavior
  • Increased withdrawn behavior
  • Reduced maturity
  • Decreased student personal
  • satisfaction
  • Reduced student relationships
  • Decreased problem solving abilities
  • Decreased ability to deal with stress

7
Impact of reduced social skills on educational
performance?
  • Decreased classroom participation
  • Reduced grades
  • Difficult classroom and/or school environment
  • Bullying

8
Why work on social skills?
  • Improved classroom management
  • Improved grades
  • Improved school safety
  • Positive school environment

9
Skillstreaming
  • Social skills training program being used in the
    schools.
  • Goal - teach desirable skills to improve social
    skills in a systematic way.
  • Positively reinforcing good social behaviors.
  • Uses teacher and peer modeling and role play.
  • Includes checklists that can be used for
    assessing social skills in an organized and
    measureable way.
  •  

10
Skillstreaming Assessments
  • The Skillstreaming program has three checklists.
  • They measure social behaviors in a variety of
    real life situations.
  •  
  • The Teacher Skillstreaming Checklist - rates
    teachers perception of the social skills of the
    student in the classroom and in other school
    settings.
  • The Parent Skillstreaming Checklist - rates
    parents perceptions of the childs skill levels
    in the home and neighborhood.
  • The Student Skillstreaming Checklist rates
    students perception of his/her own social skills
    in the home and school environment.
  •  

11
Teacher/Parent Checklists
  • Each child is rated on 60 social skills using the
    following scale -
  • 1 if the child is almost never good at using the
    skill.
  • 2 if the child is seldom good at using the skill.
  • 3 if the child is sometimes good at using the
    skill.
  • 4 if the child is often good at using the skill.
  • 5 if the child is almost always good at using the
    skill.

12
Some Skills
  • Listening
  • Asking for Help
  • Saying Thank You
  • Ignoring Distractions
  • Joining In
  • Conversational Skills
  • Sharing
  • Apologizing

13
More Skills
  • Dealing with Feelings
  • Using Self-Control
  • Responding to Teasing
  • Staying out of Trouble
  • Dealing with Embarrassment
  • Reacting to Failure
  • Dealing with Losing

14
Wonderings About Checklists with regard to
social skills.
  • Can they help measure the educational impact
    using parent/teacher input?
  • Are parent and teacher perceptions similar of
    different?
  •  
  • Can they provide us with a reliable baseline?
  • Can they assist in providing data-driven,
    individualized instruction?
  • Can they drive parent/teacher/therapist
    communication in a more objective manner?
  •  

15
Implementation of the Study
  • Data was collected on 5 first and second grade
    students at MRS.
  •  
  • Each student was identified as having delays in
    social skills. These difficulties were documented
    in writing by an IEP, a 504 or and IRS plan.
  •  
  • The children were all in a regular education
    setting (regular ed or inclusive class).
  •  
  • Data was collected on each of the identified
    students utilizing 3 checklists.
  •  
  • Two of the checklists administered were from the
    Skillstreaming program the Teacher Checklist
    and the Parent Checklist.
  •  
  • All students were also administered the
    Assessment of Pragmatic Skills
  •  
  • This checklist administered by a speech
    pathologist to reduce subjectivity.
  •  
  •  

16
Comparison of Initial Results from Social Skills
Checklists Parent, Teacher and Therapist
  • Figure 1
  • Blue Parent Survey, RedTeacher Survey,
    GreenTherapist Checklist

17
Comments
  • There is room on the parent and teacher
    assessments to write comments.
  • Although the comments were unexpected, they were
    very informative.

18
Comments
  • Doesnt realize why others are mad or annoyed at
    his behavior.
  • Sometimes his perception of the rules differs
    from others. He then becomes upset thinking
    others are wrong.
  • He doesnt like to lose. Will often accuse
    others of cheating during games.

19
Interpretations
  • An educational impact was noted.
  • There appears to be reliability in the informal
    checklists.
  •  
  • Teacher, parent and therapists perceptions
    appear closely correlated.
  • Teachers and parents wrote comments that turned
    out to be very useful for grouping and
    individualized target selection.
  •  
  •  

20
What was done with the information?
  • Parent/teacher/therapist communication.
  • Qualified students for social skills training
    and/or speech therapy by establishing an
    educational impact using parent and teacher
    input.
  • Children were grouped for Skillstreaming and
    individualized targets were selected service
    delivery model and frequency varied.

21
Service Delivery Models
  • Small group speech therapy in therapy room
    ran by speech therapist
  • Circle of Friends - a social club during
    lunch/recess, 50 typical and 50 socially
    delayed for 30 or 45 minutes ran by a teacher,
    aide or CST member
  • Large group presented to the entire class in a
    lesson format, has been utilized at MRS in an
    inclusive class.

22
Steps in Skillstreaming
  • Define the skill
  • Establish student skill need with a discussion
  • Teacher role play
  • Peer role play
  • Provide performance feedback
  • Review

23
Circle of Friends
24
Teacher Role Play
25
(No Transcript)
26
Student Role Play
27
Is It Working?
  • The teachers were given a copy of the teachers
    checklist again in March 2012.
  • This data was used to compare individual
    performance on the teachers checklist before and
    after implementation of Skillstreaming.
  • Teachers were also given a survey discussing
    progress and the data was compiled to see trends.
  •  

28
Comparison of September and March Skillstreaming
Checklist Results
  • Figure 2 - BlueTeacher Results before
    Skillstreaming, RedResults in March 2012

29
Teachers Survey
  • Please rate improvement
  • Classroom behavior
  • Friendship making skills
  • Dealing with Feelings
  • Dealing with Stress

30
Teacher Survey
  • 1 No improvement
  • 2 Little improvement
  • 3- Some improvement
  • 4 Good improvement
  • 5 Exceptional improvement
  •  

31
  • Figure 3 - Data from Teacher Survey

32
Interpretation
  •  
  • The survey results appeared to demonstrate at
    least some improvement.
  • Checklists had mixed results.
  •  
  • The checklist may not be sensitive enough to
    measure progress over a short period of time.
  • Some children may need more intensive
    intervention or intervention over a longer
    period.
  •  

33
Reflection
  • ????????????????????????????????
  • Does that data provide some supporting
    evidence that the Skillstreaming assessments are
    accurate and useful in evaluating and treating
    our students with social skill deficits?

34
Yes!
  • It did demonstrate an educational impact
    utilizing parent/teacher input.
  • Parents/teachers appear to be good reporters.
  •  
  • Checklists can be used to create a baseline.
  •  
  • Useful information for individualized,
    data-driven instruction.
  •  
  • Useful for grouping of children based on their
    social skills needs.

35
Also Useful tool for
  • Parent/therapist communication
  • Teacher/therapist communication
  •  
  • Parent/teacher communication
  • Parent conferences, IEP and IRS meetings

36
But..
  • The tools dont give as a severity level.
  • They are not based on normative data.
  • The accuracy scales are still subjective.
  •  
  • Parent/teacher perspectives can influence
    results.

37
  • Did the students progress with the
    Skillstreaming program?

38
Yes!
  • At least some students appeared to benefit
    based on data collected but..
  • The checklists may not be sensitive enough
    measure progress over a short period of time
    (under a year).
  • Some children may need more intense intervention
    than what they were receiving.
  • Others factors may have led to the improvement.

39
External factors contributed to the improvement ??
  • Home life
  • Adjusting to teacher/class
  • Classroom/school-based initiatives (ex. Be a
    Buddy not a Bully, Peer buddies)
  •  

40
Other Factors to Consider
  • Small group of children targeted.
  • Various service delivery models with different
    frequencies and durations were utilized.
  • May be beneficial to tease out if children
    improved on certain skills and not others and
    why.
  •  

41
Conclusions
  • The Skillstreaming program help make informal
    assessment more measurable and organized with
    parent/teacher input. The tools appear to be
    useful for communication and therapy.
  • It appears that at least some of the children are
    benefiting from the Skillstreaming program.
  • It is difficult to decipher out what service
    delivery model and frequency of services is most
    effective.

42
References
  • McGinnis, Ellen Goldstein, Arnold, (1997),
    Skillstreaming in the Elementary School Child
    Revised Edition.
  • McGinnis, Ellen Goldstein, Arnold, (1997).
    Skillstreaming in the Elementary School Child
    Revised Edition Program Forms.
  • Shipley, K McAfee, J. (1992), Assessment in
    Speech-Language Pathology A Resource Manual
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