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Italy: Birthplace of the Renaissance

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Italy: Birthplace of the Renaissance The European Renaissance was a rebirth of learning and the arts that began in Italy in the 1300s. Italy s Advantages Italy had ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Italy: Birthplace of the Renaissance


1
Italy Birthplace of the Renaissance
  • The European Renaissance was a rebirth of
    learning and the arts that began in Italy in the
    1300s.

2
Italys Advantages
  • Italy had three advantages over the rest of
    Europe that helped lead to the Renaissance.
  • Thriving trade cities
  • A wealthy merchant class
  • Classical heritage of Greece and Rome.
  • Also, the rest of Europe was embroiled in the
    Hundreds Years War.

3
The Hundreds Years War
  • The Hundred Years War was a war that lasted from
    1337 to 1453. The war was fought between England
    and France in a struggle for the control of land
    in France.
  • Victory passed back and forth between France and
    England until the French drove the English out of
    France entirely.
  • Joan of Arch led France to victory but is
    captured and executed.
  • The Hundred Years War gave rise to nationalism,
    empowered the French King and the English
    Parliament.

4
Urban Centers
  • The trade and transportation that developed
    during the Crusades led to the growth of large
    city-states in northern Italy.
  • The Bubonic Plague struck these cities hard,
    killing up to 60 of the population. The large
    population decline led to economic changes.
    Because there were fewer workers, thy could
    demand higher wages.

5
Merchants and the Medici
  • Milan, Florence and Venice all operated
    independently and collected their own taxes and
    raised their own armies.
  • The merchants were the most powerful and
    influential class, but their social rank was
    earned, not inherited like the nobles.
  • Individual achievement was a very important
    element of the Renaissance.

6
Medici Family
  • The city of Florence was controlled by the
    powerful Medici family.
  • Cosimo deMedici was the wealthiest European of
    his time.
  • He controlled Florence for nearly 30 years.

Cosimo deMedici
7
Classical Heritage
  • Renaissance scholars looked down on the art of
    the Middle Ages and began to turn their interest
    to the classic Greek and Roman styles.
  • In the 1300s, scholars began to study the ancient
    Latin manuscripts that had been preserved in the
    monasteries.
  • With the fall of Constantinople in 1453, the
    Byzantine scholars fled
  • the city with the ancient Greek manuscripts
    of the Byzantine Empire
  • and ancient Roman Empire which scholars
    believed had been lost
  • forever.

8
Classical Worldly Values
  • Classics lead to Humanism
  • Humanists focused on human potential and
    achievements.
  • Enjoyment of Worldly Pleasures
  • The basic spirit of the Renaissance is secular
    concerned with the here and now as opposed to a
    better life after death.
  • Patrons of the Arts
  • Popes and merchants became supporters of the
    arts.
  • Renaissance Man
  • The ideal Renaissance individual excelled in many
    fields and all areas of study.

9
Renaissance Revolutionizes Art
  • Many Renaissance artists developed new techniques
    such as perspective.
  • Leonardo da Vinci typified the true Renaissance
    Man.
  • Raphael created realistic masterpieces.

Leonardo da Vinci
10
Leonardo
  • Leonardo da Vinci was deeply interested in how
    things work. He studied how muscles move, how
    veins are arranged in a leaf.
  • Among his most famous works are the Mona Lisa,
    and the Last Supper. Only 17 of his paintings
    still survive.

11
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13
Leonardo da Vincis Inventions
14
Michelangelo Buonarroti
  • Michelangelo was a true Renaissance Man, he
    excelled at almost every area of study. He was a
    painter, sculpture, poet and architect.
  • Among his most famous works are the design of the
    dome at the top of St. Peters Basilica, his
    statue David. and his paintings on the ceiling
    of the Sistine Chapel.

15
The Sistine Chapel
  • To paint the Sistine Chapel, Michelangelo lay
    stretched on his back on a high scaffold.
  • His working conditions were very bad. He worked
    in scorching heat in the summer and had to work
    by candlelight.

16
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17
Michelangelo
18
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21
Raphael
  • Raphael learned his trade by studying the works
    of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci.
  • He enjoyed painting the Madonna.
  • His greatest achievements fill the library in the
    Vatican.
  • He died on his 37th birthday after a short
    illness. All of Rome went into mourning.

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24
Renaissance Literature
  • Renaissance writers began to develop the
    techniques still used today.
  • They began writing in the vernacular (local
    language)
  • Wrote for self-expression and portrayed the
    individuality of their subjects.

25
Dante
  • Dante began writing his works in Italian instead
    of classical Latin. His most famous work is
    Inferno which portrays a mans journey through
    the nine circles of Hell.

26
Dantes Inferno
27
Machiavelli Advises Rulers
  • Niccolò Machiavelli wrote a political guidebook
    entitled The Prince.
  • In The Prince, Machiavelli examines how a ruler
    can gain power and keep it.
  • He believed that for a ruler to succeed in a
    wicked world, a leader had to be as strong as a
    lion and shrewd as a fox.
  • He was not concerned with moral correctness, only
    political effectiveness.

28
Women Writers
  • Women writers of the Renaissance wrote about
    personal subjects, not politics.
  • Vittoria Colonna wrote sonnets with Michelangelo
    and helped to publish the Courtier.

29
The End
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