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Chicago Police Crisis Intervention Team

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40 hour State Certification course. Voluntary Training Program. Mental ... Carrie Steiner Illinois School of Psychology. Impact Chicago Police Department ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Chicago Police Crisis Intervention Team


1
Chicago Police Crisis Intervention Team
  • NAMI of Greater Chicago

2
Chicago PoliceCrisis Intervention TeamProgram
goals
  • Enhance outcomes
  • Officer safety
  • De-escalation
  • Diversion
  • Crisis prevention

3
Chicago PoliceCrisis Intervention TeamProgram
goals
  • Identify Mental Health calls
  • Quantify Mental Health calls
  • Identify best practice methods

4
Training
  • 40 hour State Certification course
  • Voluntary Training Program
  • Mental Health Court Training
  • Office of Emergency Communication call taker
    training
  • Mental Health Service System Training
  • Focus groups

5
Training
  • History Overview 1 hour
  • Signs Symptoms 4 hours
  • Risk Assessment/Intervention 4 hours
  • Developmental Disabilities 2 hours
  • Child/adolescent Disorders 2 hours
  • Substance abuse/Co-occurring 2 hours
  • Psychotropic medications 1 hour
  • Geriatric Disorders 1 hour
  • Hearing Voices Exercise 1 hour
  • Legal Issues (Petition) 2 hours
  • Department Procedures 2 hours

6
Training
  • Consumer/Family Panel 3 hours
  • Community Resource Panel 3 hours
  • Mental Health Court Panel 1 hour
  • CIT Role-play 8hours

7
Measurements
  • Effectiveness of training
  • Amy Watson University of Illinois Chicago
    (UIC)
  • Training content
  • Sue Pickett-Schenk University of Illinois,
    Chicago (UIC)
  • Efficacy of training
  • Carrie Steiner Illinois School of
    Psychology
  • Impact Chicago Police Department

8
A rapidly diffusing intervention
  • Over 400 hundred CIT programs (BJA, 2006)
  • Identification of Key Elements (CSG)
  • Evidence (limited but mounting)
  • Reduced injuries (Dupont Cochran, 2000 )
  • Reduced arrests (Steadman, et al 2000 Teller et
    al 2006)
  • Increased transports to hospital (increase
    voluntary) (Teller et al 2006)
  • Increased perceptions of effectiveness (Borum, et
    al 1998)
  • Improved attitudes (Compton, et al 2006)

9
Measurements
  • Prior to training, most officers would elect to
    arrest
  • After training, most officers would elect to
    divert
  • The key to this turn-around lies in the training
  • Trained CIT officers recognize the signs and
    symptoms of mental illness

10
CIT is more than just training
  • Thus, we need to model and measure the other
    elements outcomes

11
Model of CIT Effectiveness (Watson, Morabito,
Draine Ottati)
12
Studying CIT in Chicago.and beyond
  • Evaluate effectiveness of CIT in Chicago
  • Test strategies for measuring key variables and
    outcomes
  • Provide groundwork for multi-site study of CIT
    in several cities
  • work supported by NIMH R34 MH081558

13
Partnerships
  • NAMI of Greater Chicago
  • Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards
    Board
  • Illinois Office of Mental Health
  • Cook County Circuit Court
  • Mental Health Service System
  • Office of Emergency Management and Communications
  • University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Illinois College of Psychology


14
The Pilot Program
  • 7th District (Englewood) 23rd District (Town
    Hall)
  • 40 officers and supervisors per District
  • 1 Sgt, 2 police officers per team
  • Measurement instruments

FOR MORE INFO...
Lt. Jeff Murphy, CIT Coordinator
jeffry.murphy_at_chicagopolice.org Sgt. Bill Lange,
CIT Team Manager william.lange_at_chicagopolice.org
15
Mental Heath Court
16
Since 1990s Over 130 Courts Nationally Have Been
Developed
  • Most are adult criminal courts
  • Have a separate docket dedicated to persons with
    mental illnesses
  • Divert criminal defendants from jail into
    treatment programs
  • Some courts monitor the defendants during
    treatment and have the ability to impose criminal
    sanctions for failure to comply

17
The Cook County Model
  • Target population
  • All voluntary admission to program
  • Works exclusively with MI felony offenders
  • 24 month probation
  • Four phases of treatment
  • State of Illinois Division of Mental Health open
    cases
  • Generally non-violent, non-sex offenders
  • Economically disadvantaged
  • Co-occurring substance use disorder

18
Unique Program Features
  • Primary Focus Community Case Management
  • Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Chicago Police
    Department
  • Clinical Emphasis-Multidisciplinary Team
  • Sanctions-based system that keeps the mentally
    ill offender (MIO) out of jail/prison and in
    community services
  • Open state mental health cases services are paid
    through Medicaid
  • Focus on high-risk clients felony probationers

19
The Process as of Now(What we are finding
reality to be)
  • The program individuals have
  • Much more extensive criminal backgrounds(compared
    to a 7 year review of Cook County drug court
    participants)
  • Much more extensive psychiatric histories
    (including major Axis II Personality Disorders)
  • Few, if any, community resources with adequate
    funding to service the level of care needed

20
Criminal Justice History of Program Participants
at Admission
21
Criminal Activity Pre- and Post-Admission
22
In Custody Days and Costs
Average Jail Costs
Average Days in Custody
23
Increase Public Safety
  • For all 139 participants
  • 75 reduction in arrests
  • 78 no felony arrests
  • 91 no felony conviction
  • Average days in custody went from 112 to 11.5
    following a new arrest (annualized)

24
Graduates
  • For the first two graduating classes
  • 100 no felony arrests
  • 100 no drug crime arrests
  • 93 decrease in total convictions
  • Average time in custody fell from 74 days to 3
    hours (per year)
  • Related costs from 9,559 to 14

25
What we have learned about recovery
  • The 24 month probation time frame is short for
    probationers to accomplish all we want them to
  • CJS has made significant adjustments (also from
    the drug court model)
  • Recovery takes time
  • It is not linear
  • 1st 3-6 months crucial
  • People who do well seem to turn a corner at
    around 12-15 months

26
How does the Mental Health Court Team evaluate
probationers progress?
  • New arrests
  • Drug test results
  • Compliance with probation conditions, including
    engagement in treatment
  • Progress toward work and/or school
  • Attaining stable housing

27
What does CIT have to do with all of this?
  • CIT officers are the muscle for the mental
    health court judges
  • CIT officers strive to serve MH Court warrants
    within 48 hours of issuance
  • CIT officers appear in MH Court to testify after
    warrant has been served
  • CIT officers call this ongoing diversion

28
New Initiatives
  • HBT/SWAT
  • School Patrol/SVU Officer training
  • Advanced CIT Training
  • Autism
  • Suicide
  • Mental Health Court Warrant Procedures
  • Veteran PTSD/TBI/Justice Involved

29
Chicago Police DepartmentCrisis Intervention Team
  • Lt. Jeff Murphy - CIT Coordinator
  • Education and Training Division
  • jeffry.murphy_at_chicagopolice.org
  • Suzanne M. Andriukaitis, M.A., LCSWExecutive
    DirectorNAMI Greater Chicago
  • Email namigc_at_aol.com
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