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Workplace Emergency Planning

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Workplace Emergency Planning – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Workplace Emergency Planning


1
Workplace Emergency Planning Preparedness
Medford Fire Prevention Bureau Based on the 2007
Oregon Fire Code
2
Occupancy Classification Groups
  • A-Assembly
  • B-Business
  • E-Educational
  • F-Factory, Industrial
  • H-Hazardous
  • I-Institutional
  • M-Mercantile
  • R-Residential
  • SR-Special Residential
  • S-Storage
  • U-Miscellaneous

Source (OFC 202)
3
Emergency Planning
  • Includes Fire Evacuation and Fire Safety Plans
  • When Required
  • Group A, except worship areas lt2000 occupants
  • Group B, 500 or more occupants 100 above or
    below
  • lowest level of exit discharge
  • Group E
  • Group H
  • Group I
  • Group R-2 college and university buildings
  • Group R-4 Group R subject to licensure by state
  • Group SR
  • High Rise
  • Group M, 500 or more occupants 100 above or
    below
  • lowest level of exit discharge
  • Covered Malls gt50,000 sq. ft.
  • Underground buildings
  • Group A, E, or M buildings with atriums

Source (OFC 404)
4
Emergency Planning
  • Why Have an Emergency Plan?
  • To prevent fatalities and injuries
  • To reduce damage to buildings and contents
  • To accelerate the resumption of normal operations
  • Because the fire code requires it
  • Consider
  • There are approximately 75,000 fires annually
    that cost businesses over 2 billion
  • These fires kill more than 200 and injure more
    than 5,000 people each year
  • 45 of businesses never reopen after a fire due
    to the high cost of recovery and repairs

Sources OSHA, Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
5
Fire Evacuation Plans
  • To Prepare for and Define the Roles for
    Evacuation and Relocation of Occupants During an
    Emergency
  • Includes
  • Emergency egress or escape routes
  • Procedures for employees
  • Who remains to operate critical equip. before
    evacuating
  • To account for employees and occupants
  • ID those
  • Responsible for rescue or medical aid
  • Who can be contacted for further information
  • ID preferred and alternative means of notifying
    occupants of a fire or emergency
  • Preferred and any alternative means of notifying
    fire department or appropriate emergency
    organization

Source (OFC 404.3.1)
6
Fire Evacuation Plans
  • Staff Duties and Responsibilities
  • Emergency coordinator
  • Chain of command
  • Alternative communication center
  • Address who will assist disabled workers
  • A system for accounting for personnel and
    non-personnel following an evacuation
  • Identify who is trained and willing to deal with
    casualties

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
7
Fire Safety Plans
  • How to React to an Emergency Building Site
    Layout and Hazards
  • How to React to an Emergency
  • Procedure to report an emergency
  • Activating an emergency plan
  • Procedure for alerting staff
  • Ordering an evacuation
  • ID personnel responsible for systems and equip.
    installed to prevent or control fires
  • ID personnel responsible for maintenance,
    housekeeping, and controlling fuel hazard sources
  • List of major fire hazards

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
8
Fire Safety Plans
  • Also Includes
  • Site Plans
  • Floor Plans Clearly Posted Throughout Building
    Showing
  • Evacuation routes and alternate means of escape
    for each room or portion of the occupancy
  • Accessible egress routes
  • Designated Safe Areas
  • Fire alarm pull stations
  • Fire alarm control panels
  • Fire extinguishers and manual fire extinguishing
    equipment
  • Area separation walls
  • First aid areas

Source (OFC 404.3.2)
9
Fire Safety and Evacuation Plans
10
Fire Safety Plans
  • Emergency Plan Guidelines and Procedures
  • Fire
  • Earthquakes
  • Explosion
  • Bomb threats
  • Chemical spills
  • Workplace violence
  • Utility Failure
  • Medical emergency
  • Triage

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
11
Fire Evacuation and Safety Plans
  • Records
  • Emergency contact numbers
  • Emergency dispatch
  • Hospitals
  • Utility companies
  • Government agencies
  • Alarm company
  • Sprinkler company
  • Any other responsible parties
  • Documentation of drills should include the date
    and time of each drill, the person conducting the
    drill and other information relative to the
    drill.
  • Updated list of employee emergency contact
    information

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
12
Fire Evacuation and Safety Plans
  • Maintenance
  • Shall be reviewed or updated annually or as
    necessitated by changes in
  • Staff assignments
  • Occupancy
  • Physical arrangement of building
  • Availability
  • Shall be available in the workplace for reference
    and review by employees
  • Shall be available to fire code official for
    review upon request

Source (OFC 404)
13
Emergency Evacuation Drills
  • Purpose of Fire Drills
  • To be ready should an occurrence happen,
    increasing the chanced of survival. A
    disorganized evacuation can lead to confusion,
    injury, death and property damage.
  • When Required
  • Group A quarterly for employees only
  • Group B annually
  • 500 or more occupants 100 above or below lowest
    level of exit discharge
  • Group E monthly complete evacuation.
  • Group I quarterly each shift for staff only.
  • Group R1 quarterly each shift for staff only.
  • Group R-2 (college and university) quarterly all
    occupants
  • Group R-4 SR see IFC 408.1.2.
  • High Rise annually employees only

Source (OFC 405)
14
Staff Training
  • Emergency Egress and Relocation Drills
  • Shall be held with sufficient frequency to
    familiarize occupants with the drill procedure
    and to establish conduct of the drill as a matter
    of routine.
  • Planning and conduct of drills shall be assigned
    only to competent persons.
  • To be held at expected and unexpected times and
    under varying conditions.
  • Shall be Initiated by the fire alarm system when
    present
  • Drill participants shall relocate to a
    predetermined location and remain at such until a
    recall or dismissal signal is given.
  • Orderly evacuation should receive priority over
    the speed of evacuation.
  • Occupants should be accounted for.
  • A record shall be kept.

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
15
Staff Training
  • In case of fire, think RACE
  • Rescue all persons in immediate area
  • Alarm announce the fire- Pull alarm and dial
    911
  • Confine the fire by closing doors
  • Evacuate/Extinguish

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
16
Staff Training
  • Fire Extinguisher Training
  • Decision
  • Only use if the fire is small and contained,
  • and not spreading beyond its starting point
  • Do not waste time in trying to fight the fire if
    the fire might block your only way out
  • Proper extinguisher use, think PASS
  • Pull trigger pin (Stand back several feet away
    from fire)
  • Aim low, point the nozzle at the base of the fire
  • Squeeze trigger
  • Sweep from side to side until the fire appears to
    be out
  • Medical Training
  • First aid, CPR, etc.
  • Safety Equipment
  • First aid kits, hardhats, goggles, eye washing
    facilities, breathing apparatus, etc.
  • Fire Prevention-Monthly Inspections

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
17
Staff Training
  • Fire Protection Systems (Alarms and Sprinklers)
  • Train employees how your particular system works
  • Employees should be familiar with fire alarm
    signals
  • Smoke alarms detect smoke, sprinklers are set off
    by heat
  • Smoke alarms systems are early warning devices,
    allowing precious time to evacuate
  • Fire sprinkler systems are designed to control
    the fire
  • Normally one or two sprinklers will
  • discharge, not the whole system

Sources Oregon Fire Code, NFPA, OSHA, and
Numerous Business Emergency Plans.
18
Video
  • Getting Out Alive

Source Complete Fire Prevention Library, The
Idea Bank
19
Fire Prevention
20
Access/Premises
21
Egress Hazards
Buildings or structures that are not provided
with adequate means of egress or emergency
escapes are unsafe and shall be subject to the
abatement procedures specified in Section 110.
(OFC 1001.3)
22
Egress Hazards-Locked Exits
23
Emergency Lighting/Illumination
  • Existing Buildings, Where Required
  • Agt50 (Except Churches lt300)
  • B three or more stories and 100 or more occupants
    above or below level of exit discharge
  • B 1,000 or more occupants
  • E exitways and windowless areas of occupancy
  • Fgt100 (Except buildings used only in daylight
    with windows)
  • I
  • M (Except buildings lt3000 sq. ft on one story
    only)
  • R-1 (Except where each guestroom has direct
    outdoor grade level access)
  • R-2 (Except where each guestroom has direct
    outdoor grade level access)
  • R-4 (Except where each guestroom has direct
    outdoor grade level access)
  • (OFC 1027.5)

24
Exit Signs
25
Electrical Hazards
26
Fire Alarm Systems
27
Fire Extinguishers
28
Fire/Smoke Separations
29
Fire Suppression Systems
30
Commercial Kitchen Hoods
3
What wrong with this picture?
31
Heat Sources
32
Housekeeping/Decorations
33
Mechanical Hazards
34
Smoke Detection
35
Storage-Combustible
36
Storage-Compressed Gas Cylinders
37
Storage-Flammable Liquids
38
Storage-Hazardous
39
Questions?
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