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Train The Safety

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A Competent person is someone who has broad knowledge... Tie Training to Natural and System Consequences. Module 4: DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Train The Safety


1
Welcome! Train The Safety Trainer Workshop
2
Trainer Name Trainer Position Organization
3
  • Administrivia
  • Getting around
  • Ground rules

4
Goals
  • This workshop will help you understand
  • OSHA training requirements
  • How to develop and operate an effective safety
    training program
  • Adult learning principles
  • How to plan a training session and develop
    effective lesson plans
  • Presentation skills
  • How to conduct on-the-job (OJT) training

5
What's Inside? Whats most important?
6
Form Teams
  • Introduce yourselves
  • Select a team leader
  • Appoint spokesperson

7
WeRUs
Name your team! Quickly brainstorm a creative
name for your team for the day. Hey, if it's
hard to come up with a namebe afraidbe very
afraid -)
8
  • Great Expectations!
  • Discuss what you want to learn in this course.
  • Write your expectations on flipchart paper.
  • Team spokesperson briefly present the team's
    list.
  • Our great expectations!
  • Other great expectations!

9
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
10
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
Education the presentation of general
information that may or may not be used by the
learner.
  • Ed-u-cer-e (ey-doo-ker-ey) Latinthat which
    leads out of ignorance
  • Anything that affects our knowledge, skills, and
    attitudes (SKA's)
  • The why in safety educates about the natural
    and system consequences of behavior
  • Primarily increases knowledge and attitudes
  • A process through which learners gain new
    understanding, acquire new skills, or change
    their attitudes or behaviors. 

11
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
Training the development and delivery of
information that people will actually use.
  • One method of education
  • The how
  • Primarily increases specific knowledge and skills

12
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
13
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
  • What workplace training can and cant do for
    workers
  • Training isnt likely to help if workers dont
    understand it, if they are unmotivated, or if
    they have poor work attitudes.

14
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
  • What workplace training can and cant do for
    workers
  • Training isnt likely to help if workers dont
    understand it, if they are unmotivated, or if
    they have poor work attitudes.
  • Make training part of a sound safety and health
    program.

15
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
How does ineffective training negatively impact
the organization?
16
Module 1 Defining Education and Training
Analyze this! What are the root causes for lack
of understanding, motivation, and proper
attitudes?
17
Module 2 OVERVIEW OF ANSI/OSHA STANDARDS
18
What do OSHA rules say about employer training
responsibilities?
19
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
20
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
Safety trainers are primarily change agents
  • Leader
  • Evaluator
  • Group Facilitator
  • Individual Development Counselor
  • Instructional Writer
  • Instructor  
  • Manager of Training and Development
  • Marketer
  • Media Specialist
  • Needs Analyst
  • Program Administrator
  • Program Designer
  • Strategist
  • Task Analyst
  • Theoretician
  • Transfer Agent

21
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
ANSI Z490.1-2001 Instructor Qualifications
22
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Trainer criteria shall include subject matter
    expertise and training delivery skills
  • Trainers shall have an appropriate level of
    technical knowledge, skills, or abilities in the
    subjects they teach.

23
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Trainer criteria shall include subject matter
    expertise and training delivery skills
  • Trainers shall have an appropriate level of
    technical knowledge, skills, or abilities in the
    subjects they teach.
  • Trainers shall be competent in delivery
    techniques and methods appropriate to adult
    learning.

24
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Trainer criteria shall include subject matter
    expertise and training delivery skills
  • Trainers shall have an appropriate level of
    technical knowledge, skills, or abilities in the
    subjects they teach.
  • Trainers shall be competent in delivery
    techniques and methods appropriate to adult
    learning.
  • Trainers shall maintain their training skills by
    participating in continuing education,
    development programs, or experience related to
    their subject matter expertise delivery skills.

25
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Trainer criteria shall include subject matter
    expertise and training delivery skills
  • Trainers shall have an appropriate level of
    technical knowledge, skills, or abilities in the
    subjects they teach.
  • Trainers shall be competent in delivery
    techniques and methods appropriate to adult
    learning.
  • Trainers shall maintain their training skills by
    participating in continuing education,
    development programs, or experience related to
    their subject matter expertise delivery skills.
  • The trainer shall apply adult learning principles
    appropriate to the target audience and the
    learning objectives.

26
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
OSHA Guidelines for Instructor Competency
OSHA defines "Competent" as possessing the
skills, knowledge, experience, and judgment to
perform assigned tasks or activities
satisfactorily as determined by the employer.
27
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Instructors should be deemed competent on the
    basis of
  • previous documented experience in their area of
    instruction,

28
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Instructors should be deemed competent on the
    basis of
  • previous documented experience in their area of
    instruction,
  • successful completion of a "train-the-trainer"
    program specific to the topics they will teach,
    and

29
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Instructors should be deemed competent on the
    basis of
  • previous documented experience in their area of
    instruction,
  • successful completion of a "train-the-trainer"
    program specific to the topics they will teach,
    and
  • an evaluation of instructional competence by the
    Training Director.

30
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Instructors should be required to maintain
    professional competency by
  • participating in continuing education or
    professional development programs

31
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • Instructors should be required to maintain
    professional competency by
  • participating in continuing education or
    professional development programs
  • or
  • by completing successfully an annual refresher
    course and having an annual review by the
    Training Director.

32
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • The annual review by the Training Director
    should
  • include observation of an instructor's delivery,

33
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • The annual review by the Training Director
    should
  • include observation of an instructor's delivery,
  • a review of those observations with the trainer,
    and

34
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • The annual review by the Training Director
    should
  • include observation of an instructor's delivery,
  • a review of those observations with the trainer,
    and
  • an analysis of any instructor or class
    evaluations completed by the students during the
    previous year.

35
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
Competency and qualifications OSHAs safety and
health requirements frequently use specific terms
to identify the different categories of workers
who must meet specific training requirements.
36
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • A Certified person has successfully completed
    specialized training and the training has been
    certified in writing by a professional
    organization.

37
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • A Certified person has successfully completed
    specialized training
  • A Designated person has received extensive
    training in a particular task in a particular
    task and is assigned by the employer to perform
    that task in specific operations.

38
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • A Certified person has successfully completed
    specialized training
  • A Designated person has received extensive
    training in a particular task
  • An Authorized person is permitted by an employer
    to be in a regulated area the term also refers
    to a person assigned by the employer to perform a
    specific task or to be in a specific location at
    a jobsite.

39
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • A Certified person has successfully completed
    specialized training
  • A Designated person has received extensive
    training in a particular task
  • An Authorized person is permitted by an employer
    to be in a regulated area
  • A Competent person is someone who has broad
    knowledge of worksite safety and health issues,
    who is capable of identifying existing and
    predictable worksite hazards, and who has
    management approval to control the hazards.

40
Module 3 THE ROLE OF THE TRAINER
  • A Certified person has successfully completed
    specialized training
  • A Designated person has received extensive
    training in a particular task
  • An Authorized person is permitted by an employer
    to be in a regulated area
  • A Competent person is someone who has broad
    knowledge
  • A Qualified person is someone who, through
    training and professional experience, has
    demonstrated the ability to resolve problems
    relating to a specific task or process.

41
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
"Each mind has its own method." Ralph Waldo
Emerson, 1803-1882
42
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
  • A "program" contains a written plan, policies,
    processes, procedures, rules, forms, reports, and
    possibly other documents.
  • Include a written plan for training new-hire and
    current employees.

"Each mind has its own method." Ralph Waldo
Emerson, 1803-1882
43
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
  • A "program" contains a written plan, policies,
    processes, procedures, rules, forms, reports, and
    possibly other documents.
  • Include a written plan for training new-hire and
    current employees.
  • The plan provides training clearly written policy
    and guidelines

"Each mind has its own method." Ralph Waldo
Emerson, 1803-1882
44
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
  • The plan should contain elements that are
    informative and directive.
  • It should inform everyone about the safety
    training mission, policies, procedures.

"Each mind has its own method." Ralph Waldo
Emerson, 1803-1882
45
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
  • The plan should contain elements that are
    informative and directive.
  • It should inform everyone about the safety
    training mission, policies, procedures.
  • It should also clearly state who is responsible
    for carrying out the mission, policies and
    procedures.

"Each mind has its own method." Ralph Waldo
Emerson, 1803-1882
46
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
According to ANSI 490.1-2001, at a minimum a
training program should include
  • A development piece

47
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
According to ANSI 490.1-2001, at a minimum a
training program should include
  • A development piece
  • Delivery by competent trainers

48
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
According to ANSI 490.1-2001, at a minimum a
training program should include
  • A development piece
  • Delivery by competent trainers
  • Evaluation in a continuous improvement system

49
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
According to ANSI 490.1-2001, at a minimum a
training program should include
  • A development piece
  • Delivery by competent trainers
  • Evaluation in a continuous improvement system
  • Documentation and recordkeeping

50
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
According to ANSI 490.1-2001, at a minimum a
training program should include
  • A development piece
  • Delivery by competent trainers
  • Evaluation in a continuous improvement system
  • Documentation and recordkeeping
  • A plan describing how the various training
    elements will be accomplished.

51
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
Tie Training to Natural and System Consequences
Training without effective consequences is a
waste of time and money!
52
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
Natural consequences
  • Occur automatically in response to our
    behaviors/actions.
  • We are punished or rewarded by something for what
    we do.
  • If we fall down, two consequences naturally
    occur we either get hurt or we don't.
  • In safety natural consequences refer to hurt or
    health as outcomes.

53
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
System consequences
  • Are possible organizational responses to our
    behavior/actions.
  • We are punished or rewarded by someone for what
    we do.
  • Various consequences may occur someone may
    administer discipline, apologizes, etc.

54
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
What are the natural and system consequences of
safe/unsafe behaviors/activities?
55
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
When does the "real" education occur? What is the
outcome when safety training is not supported by
the corporate culture?
56
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
Let's take a look at a sample training plan
57
Module 4 DEVELOPING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
Work the plan!
  • Discuss and list the benefits of a formal
    (written) safety training plan that employees and
    employers enjoy.
  • Benefits to the employee
  • Benefits to the employer

58
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
59
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
The first step in the training process is a basic
one to determine if a problem can be solved by
training.
60
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
  • Whenever employees are not performing their jobs
    properly, it is often assumed that training will
    bring them up to standard.

61
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
However other actions (such as hazard abatement
or the implementation of engineering controls)
would enable employees to perform their jobs
properly.
62
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
  • Problems that can be addressed effectively by
    training include
  • those that arise from lack of knowledge of a work
    process,

63
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
  • Problems that can be addressed effectively by
    training include
  • those that arise from lack of knowledge of a work
    process,
  • unfamiliarity with equipment, or

64
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
  • Problems that can be addressed effectively by
    training include
  • those that arise from lack of knowledge of a work
    process,
  • unfamiliarity with equipment, or
  • incorrect execution of a task.

65
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
  • Training is less effective (but still can be
    used) for problems arising from
  • an employee's lack of motivation or

66
Module 5 DETERMINING IF TRAINING IS NEEDED
  • Training is less effective (but still can be
    used) for problems arising from
  • an employee's lack of motivation or
  • lack of attention to the job.

67
Poor safety performance may not be the result of
a training deficiency
68
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69
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70
Non-training Options
71
Non-training Options
72
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
73
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
  • HOW TRAINING NEEDS ARISE
  • There are a number of triggers that may generate
    a training need.
  • Potential Triggers
  • Internal Indicators
  • External Influences

74
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work

75
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers

76
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers
  • Review employee personnel records

77
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers
  • Review employee personnel records
  • Determine demographics (age, gender, race)

78
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers
  • Review employee personnel records
  • Determine demographics (age, gender, race)
  • Determine experience level

79
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers
  • Review employee personnel records
  • Determine demographics (age, gender, race)
  • Determine experience level
  • Determine learning styles

80
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers
  • Review employee personnel records
  • Determine demographics (age, gender, race)
  • Determine experience level
  • Determine learning styles
  • Determine aptitudes, knowledge

81
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the audience
  • Observe workers doing work
  • Interview and/or survey workers
  • Review employee personnel records
  • Determine demographics (age, gender, race)
  • Determine experience level
  • Determine learning styles
  • Determine aptitudes, knowledge
  • Determine attitudes toward subject being taught

82
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the tasks
  • Observe experts doing the task

83
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the tasks
  • Observe experts doing the task
  • Interview experts about the task

84
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
How to get the information you need.
  • To get information about the tasks
  • Observe experts doing the task
  • Interview experts about the task
  • Review job descriptions, policy statements,
    reports

85
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
CASE STUDY Wombley Widgets, Inc.
86
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
The Situation
  • Oregon OSHA has just completed a comprehensive
    on-site consultation and recommended to the owner
    of Wombley Widgets, Inc. that effective training
    be developed and conducted for
  • Hazard Communication Program
  • Lockout/Tagout
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Emergency Action and Fire Prevention Plans
  • Safety Committee
  • Accident Investigation

87
Module 6 IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS
Currently no such training exists!
The owner has now come to you, of course, and
given you the responsibility for developing and
conducting safety training at Wombley.
88
Group Exercise
  • Choose one of the six training topics listed by
    the consultant
  • Use the information given for the case study to
    conduct a brief needs analysis for that topic.

89
Module 7DEVELOPING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
90
Establish clear-cut, competency-based learning
objectives that describe what the learner will be
able to do at the end of the training
presentation
91
What is a goal?
  • A goal is nothing more than a wish.
  • For instance, a training goal might state, "Train
    our new employees on hazard reporting
    procedures."
  • In this course we focus on getting beyond goals.
  • We'll focus on writing operational objectives.

92
What is a learning objective?
  • A learning objective is an statement describing a
    learning outcome, rather than a learning process
    or procedure.
  • It describes results, rather than the means of
    achieving those results.
  • It defines the expectation for the learner.

93
Why do we need to write objectives?
  • They help the instructor design and select
    instructional content and procedures
  • They help the instructor evaluate or assess the
    success of instruction

94
What are the criteria for an effective learning
objective?
  • The objective states a time limit.

"The end of the class" "at the conclusion of
training" "when training is concluded"
95
What are the criteria for an effective learning
objective?
  • The objective specifies the conditions of
    performance.
  • "when given a simulated requirement"
  • "when given a written test"
  • "when given a mock chemical spill"
  • "without assistance"

96
What are the criteria for an effective learning
objective?
  • The objective identifies the performer(s).
  • "all students will.."
  • "each employee will"
  • "each new worker will"

97
What are the criteria for an effective learning
objective?
  • The objective contains one action verb.
  • construct
  • identify
  • perform

98
What are the criteria for an effective learning
objective?
  • The objective specifies an acceptable standard of
    performance.
  • "all"
  • "100"
  • "every"

99
Group Exercise Do these objectives measure
up? Analyze each of the following objectives to
determine if the measure up to the criteria.
Identify and list criteria
that are missing.
100
Action verbs to use in writing objectives
These behaviors measure the success of Level
2 training and are usually measured immediately
after training through verbal or written exam and
demonstration.
101
Try thisTo develop objectives, work backwards
Step 1 Complete a simulated task analysis Step
2 Identify performance requirements Step 3
Develop a criterion test
102
Training at Wombley Widgets
Use the following template to construct one
learning objective for the training your group
will present.
103
Follow this Sequence
Time limit a Condition a Performer(s)
a Action a Standard
104
Module 8DETERMINING COURSE CONTENT
105
  • The content is everything the learner will have
    to learn in order to achieve a learning
    objective.
  • Selecting content for a training program is a
    decision-making process. Two important criteria
  • It must be useful.
  • It must be appropriate.

106
Figure this out!
If the objective is to learn how to drive the
forklift, all of the following would be useful
and appropriate for the student to learn except?
107
Reference OSHA Resources Appropriate safety
standards
108
Sequencing - Don't put the cart before the
horse Be concerned about the logical sequencing
of training, because if the lesson does not
unfold in a building, reinforcing way, the
learning process will be inhibited.
109
Basic Strategies
  • General to the specific - selling safety
  • Simple to the complex - lockout/tagout
  • Theory to practical application - engineering
    controls
  • Known to unknown - chemical hazards
  • Step by step order - accident investigation

110

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction.
111

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction. Step 2. Trainer show
and tell. Trainer EXPLAINS and PERFORMS
each step. Trainee OBSERVES each step and
QUESTIONS .
112

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction. Step 2. Trainer show
and tell. Step 3. Trainer ask and show.
Trainee EXPLAINS each step and
RESPONDS. Trainer PERFORMS each step and
QUESTIONS.
113

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction. Step 2. Trainer show
and tell. Step 3. Trainer ask and show. Step
4. Trainee tell and show. Trainee EXPLAINS,
ASKS PERMISSION, and then PERFORMS each
step. Trainer GIVES PERMISSION, OBSERVES
each step and QUESTIONS .
114

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction. Step 2. Trainer show
and tell Step 3. Trainer ask and show Step 4.
Trainee tell and show Step 5. Conclusion
115

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction. Step 2. Trainer show
and tell Step 3. Trainer ask and show Step 4.
Trainee tell and show Step 5. Conclusion Step
6. Document
116

The basic steps in OJT
Step 1. Introduction. Step 2. Trainer show
and tell Step 3. Trainer ask and show Step 4.
Trainee tell and show Step 5. Conclusion Step
6. Document Step 7. Validate
117
Training at Wombly Widgets
Group Exercise Use the worksheet below to
develop the course content and the sequence
you'll use in presenting the topic for Wombly
Widgets.
118
Module 9DEVELOPING LEARNING ACTIVITIES
119
A couple of factors will help determine the type
of learning activity to use in training.
  • One aspect is the training resources available to
    the employer.
  • Another factor is the kind of skills or knowledge
    to be learned.

120
It's important to consider appropriate learning
activities because
  • They provide an effective means for the trainee
    to learn specific information.
  • They keep the trainee interested and involved in
    the learning process.

121
Important questions to ask about the training
methods used include
  • Will the method help the trainee accomplish the
    learning objective?
  • Does the method work for the number of trainees ?
  • Does the method take into account any special
    characteristics of the group?
  • Will the method work at the training location?
  • Will there be enough time to complete the method?
  • Will the employer be able to provide the
    resources to support the method?

122
  • What motivates adult learners?
  • Adult motivation occurs on four integrated and
    increasingly more effective levels
  • Success "Hey, I can do this!"
  • Volition "I can do it my way."
  • Value "This stuff counts."
  • Enjoyment "I like doing this!"

123
What's my learning style? Check yes or no beside
each of the following statements to discover how
you generally learn. Be honest and think in
terms of most of the time, not exceptions.
124
What Methods Work For You There are more than
a hundred different methods of helping others
learn. Here are but a few, but probably the most
common, popular, and easiest to use.
125
Huddle up! Determine those activities your group
would use to present the training at Wombly
Widgets.
126
Module 10DEVELOPING TRAINING AIDS
127
Pros and Cons of training aids Videotapes or
films 35mm slides Computer-generated
slides Overhead transparencies Handouts
Flipcharts or whiteboards Job aids/Props
Instruments
128
Good example of what NOT to do
129
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130
Module 11 WRITING LESSON PLANS
131
Your training plan serves different purposes at
different points in time, as shown below.
  • It's a planning tool for helping you plan the
    details of the lesson.
  • It serves as a preparation guide for rehearsing
    the lesson.
  • It's a roadmap for you to follow.
  • It's a document that you can improve or use as
    is.

132
Outline of a typical training session
  • Opening Segment - Tell'm what you're going to
    tell'm! (___ minutes)
  • Each module contains - Tell'm! (___ minutes)
  • Final Segment - Tell'm what yov're told'm!
    (___ minutes)

133
The Job Hazard Analysisuse it as a lesson plan!
  • You can use the JHA as your basic training
    outline. Doing this will help ensure
  • training covers safety procedures and practices
    as well as other operational steps, and
  • safety procedures and practices are consistently
    taught by all trainers.

134
Module 12 DEVELOP EVAUATION METHODS
135
Level 1 Evaluation Measures learner reaction
This first level of evaluation gets feedback from
participants.
  • Process Evaluation
  • Content Evaluation
  • Methods Reaction sheets
  • Guidelines for evaluating reaction

136
Level 2 Evaluation - Measures the Learning
Quantifying the learning that took
place by measuring increased knowledge, improved
skills, changes in attitude.
  • Did the participants learn anything as a result
    of the training?
  • This level of evaluation is necessary for most
    safety training that requires the ability to
    correctly perform a procedure or practice.

137
  • OSHA believes proficiency should be evaluated and
    documented by the use of
  • a written assessment, and
  • a skill demonstration.

138
Use these guidelines when developing testing
methods for your safety training
  1. The evaluation should evaluate individual
    knowledge and skills
  2. The level of minimum achievement should be
    specified in writing.
  3. If a written test is used, it should be
    sufficient and relevant.
  4. If a skills demonstration is used, the tasks
    chosen and the means to rate successful
    completion should be fully documented.
  5. The written test and skill demonstration should
    be updated to reflect changes in the curriculum.

139
  • Level 3 - Evaluates the application
  • This level of evaluation measures both the
    learner and the safety culture
  • Gauges how well the learner applied the training

140
  • Culture. For effective Level 3 change to occur,
    the corporate culture must support the training.
    Culture at this level refers to the learner's
    immediate supervisor.
  • According to Donald Kirkpatrick, there are five
    types of climate will affect attitude about
    training
  • Preventing
  • Discouraging
  • Neutral
  • Encouraging
  • Requiring

Which response is most supportive?
141
Module 13 CONDUCTING THE TRAINING
142
How to make the introductions interesting during
the Presentation
143
How to make the introductions interesting during
the Presentation
  • Thank the audience for coming
  • Establish your credibility
  • Present the agenda
  • Set out any expectations from the audience
  • Discuss the schedule for breaks
  • Give a time frame for your presentation
  • Tell the audience what you hope they will learn
  • Do not come across as arrogant and having all the
    answers.
  • Once you've gained attention, transition

144
Group Exercise
Work this out! Discuss each element below and
list positive (what works) and negatives (what
doesn't work) for effective presentations.
Voice Dress Pace Attitude Position Exper
tise Control Dress
145
Asking and Answering Questions
Asking questions The two basic types of questions
trainer use during a presentation
  • Open-ended questions/requests - why, how,
    describe
  • Closed-ended questions - is, are, can, were

146
Listening to questions
listen to your audiences questions and comments
first before thinking of your response.
  • welcome difficult questions
  • to build rapport, say, "Thats a good question
  • make direct eye contact with the person
  • focus on the person when they are asking the
    question
  • move towards the person
  • repeat the question
  • rephrase the question

147
Answering questions
  • Respond initially to the person who asked the
    question
  • Then shift eye contact to the broad audience
  • Answer the question clearly and briefly
  • Hold your ground and dont back down
  • If you dont know the answer, say so
  • Conclude by transitioning attention back to the
    person who asked the question
  • If appropriate, ask, "Did I answer the question
    for you?" or "Does that help?

148
Match these! Match the Feelings/Thoughts listed
on the left with the non-verbal behaviors on the
right.
149
What should we do if several learners appear to
be bored or confused during training?
150
  • Handling Problem Situations
  • Problem situations have something to do with the
    level of participation of individual learners
    when learners participate too much or too little.
  • Too much participation
  • Too little participation
  • Hostility

151
What to do?
There are three important considerations when
handling problem situations
  • Eliminate or reduce the problem behavior.
    Resolve the problem to the extent necessary.
  • Maintain the self-esteem of the learner causing
    the disruption.
  • Avoid further disruptions. Make sure the
    learning environment is relaxed and conducive to
    learning.

152
Important strategies for handling problem
situations
  • Remain emotionally neutral.
  • Identify possible strategies you or other
    trainers have used before in the a similar
    situation.
  • Evaluate alternative strategies against the
    considerations above.
  • Select the strategy that best satisfies the
    criteria for the situation.

153
Strategize this!
Read and discuss the assigned scenario below.
Identify strategies that your group believes
would work in eliminating or reducing the problem
behavior(s) described. Scenario 1 Ralph
dominates the class Scenario 2 Gloria is
continually interrupting Scenario 3 Bob is
responding
154
Module 14 COORDINATE LOGISTICS

155
What is generally the best time of day to train?
Best day(s) of the week?
What are some tips to remember about
coordinating the training with others? What
should you consider when setting up a room for
training?
156
Module 15 DOCUMENTING SAFETY TRAINING

Why is it so important to thoroughly document
safety training?
157
  • Make sure your documentation is adequate
  • Strong documentation includes
  • The name of trainee(s) and trainer(s).
  • The Date of training.
  • A description of the Subject(s) being trained
  • Certification - a place for trainee and trainer
    signatures.

158
  • A trainee statement of understanding and intent
    to comply.
  • A trainee statement that he/she was provided
    opportunity to ask questions and practice.
  • A trainer statement that trainee all questions
    were answered and opportunity to practice was
    provided.
  • A trainer statement that measurement (testing) of
    knowledge and skills was conducted and that
    trainees met or exceeded required levels of
    performance.

159
Module 16 EVALUATING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
160
  • ANSI guidelines for evaluating training programs
  • ANSI Z490.1-2001, Accepted Practices in Safety
    Health and Environmental Training, recommends
    evaluating three important elements of a safety
    training program.
  • Training program management
  • Training process
  • Training results

161
OSHA Guidelines for Training Program Evaluation
  • Training Plan
  • Program management, Training director, staff
  • Training facilities and resources
  • Quality control and evaluation
  • Students
  • Summary of evaluation questions

162
Level 4 Evaluation - asks how training has
impacted business results Evaluates how the
training has impacted the quality (efficiency,
effectiveness) of a job.
163
Level 5 Evaluation - Evaluate how training has
impacted return on investment Determine how
training has improved the bottom line
profitability the return on the investment (ROI)
of the company.
164
Questions to ask when conducting Level 4 and 5
program evaluation
  • How much did accident rates decrease?
  • How much did productivity increase?
  • What reduction did we get in turnover and scrap
    rate?
  • How much has training improved work life?
  • What effective is safety committee training?
  • How much has have costs been reduced?
  • What tangible benefits have we received?

165
Module 17 IMPROVING THE TRAINING PROGRAM
166
The Deming Cycle
167
Step 1 Plan Design the change or test
  • Purpose Take time to thoroughly plan the
    proposed change in the training program before
    its implemented.
  • Pinpoint specific conditions, behaviors, results
    you expect to see as a result of the change.
  • Plan to ensure successful transition
    (instructors, supervisors) as well as change.

168
Step 2 Do - Carry out the change or test
  • Purpose Implement the change or test it on a
    small scale.
  • Educate, train, communicate the change in program
    to instructors.
  • Keep the change limited in scope to better
    measure variables.

169
Step 3 Study Examine the effects or results
of the change or test
  • Purpose To determine what was learned what
    went right or wrong.
  • Statistical process analysis, surveys,
    questionnaires, interviews

170
Step 4 Act Adopt, abandon, or repeat the
cycle
  • Purpose Incorporate what works into the system.
  • Ask not only if were doing the right things, but
    ask if were doing things right.
  • If the result was not as intended, abandon the
    change or begin the cycle again with the new
    knowledge gained.

171
Let's Review!
172
Whew!
173
Didnt we have fun!!!
Thats it...
174
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