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Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments

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Title: Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments


1
Creating Fit Healthy Ready to Learn Environments
2
Michigans GoalTo work with partners statewide
to support schools as they address childhood
weight issues
3
  • Alarming Unhealthy Weight Trends
  • (Obese at or above 95th percentile BMI for age)

Ogden C, Flegal K, Carroll M, Johnson C.
Prevalence and Trends in Overweight Among U.S.
Children and Adolescents, 1999-20000. Journal
of the American Medical Association 2002 Vol.
288, no.14, pp.1728-1732
4
On Average, Adolescents Aged 12-17, Get from Soft
Drinks
Soft drinks carbonated beverages,
fruit-flavored and part juice drinks, and sports
drinks Source USDA, Continuing Survey of Food
Intake by Individuals, 1994-96
5
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
6
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
7
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
8
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
9
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
10
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
11
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
12
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
13
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
14
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
15
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
16
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
17
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
18
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
19
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
20
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
21
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 25
22
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4 woman)
(BMI ?30, or 30 lbs overweight for 54 person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 25
Source Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, CDC
23
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003
(BMI ?30, or about 30 lbs overweight for 54
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 20-24 ?25
Source Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance
System, CDC
24
Whats the impact of overweight on the health of
our future students?
25
Whats driving increases in overweight?
26
Nutrition-Related
  • Snack calories are increasing
  • Kids who drink soft drinks consume more calories
    than kids who dont drink soft drinks
  • 1 in 5 MI high school students ate 5 servings of
    fruits/veggies per day
  • 1 in 6 MI high school students drank 3 glasses of
    milk daily (females less likely than males)

Michigan Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Weight and
Nutrition Fact Sheet, 2003
27
Physical Activity-Related
  • 62 9-13 year olds do not participate in
    organized physical activity during non-school
    hours
  • 23 of 9-13 year olds dont engage in any free
    time physical activity
  • Daily participation in physical education class
    dropped from 42 in 1991 to 25 in 1995MI YRBS
    2001
  • Screen time is increasing

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies,
Preventing Childhood Obesity Health in the
Balance. 2005 Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood
Obesity The Role of Industry http//www.iom.edu/
report.asp?id22596
28
Portion Distortion
29
Student Health Environment
Physical Activity
Peers
Open Campus
Availability
Nutrition Education
  • Ala Carte Sales
  • School Parties
  • Fundraisers
  • School Stores
  • Vending
  • Boosters
  • School Board
  • Athletics
  • Student Clubs

School Meal Program
Taste
Competition
Time to eat
Parent Knowledge
Role Modeling
30
Research Shows Positive Health Behaviors May Lead
to Increased Student Achievement
31
School Based Breakfast Lunch Programs
showed...
  • Increased School Attendance
  • 8 decline in tardiness
  • Greater Class Participation
  • 73 of staff surveyed in the first-year MMFA
    schools reported an improvement in student
    attentiveness following the start of the program.
  • Maryland State Department of Education , School
    and Community Nutrition Programs, Maryland Meals
    for Achievement (MMFA)

32
School Based Breakfast Lunch Programs
showed...
  • Improved Emotional Behaviors
  • Suspensions were down from an average of 4.4 days
    per month to 2.8per month
  • Increased Academic Achievement
  • MMFA schools saw a five-point increase in
    students who scored at or above the satisfactory
    level.
  • Maryland State Department of Education , School
    and Community Nutrition Programs, Maryland Meals
    for Achievement (MMFA)

33
School Based Physical Activity Programs
  • Increased concentration
  • Improved Mathematics, Reading Writing Scores
  • Reduced Disruptive Behaviors
  • Maintenance of Positive Interpersonal
    Relationships
  • Reduced Anxiety, Depression Fatigue

Bridging Student Health Risks and Academic
Achievement Through Comprehensive School Health
Programs Journal of School Health, August 1997
34
(No Transcript)
35
Policies
  • One step toward a
  • healthy school environment

36
Smoking
Lessons Learned Smoking rates began to decline
when public health professionals realized the
impact of policy and environmental changes.
Broadcast advertising ban Clean Indoor Air
Act Increase in cigarette taxes

37
NEW MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICIES
  • Making Environmental Change Easy
  • Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs To
    Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools
  • www.michigan.gov/documents/CSHP_Policy_77375_7.pdf

38
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICIES
  • Policy on Quality Physical Education
  • www.michigan.gov/documents/HealthPolicyPE_77380_7.
    pdf

39
NEW MICHIGAN STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICIES
  • Policy on Offering Healthy Food and Beverages In
    Venues Outside of the Federally Regulated Child
    Nutrition Programs
  • www.michigan.gov/documents/Healthy_Foods_AttchmtA_
    7.pdf

40
Schools Role
  • Ensure
  • Dietary Guidelines are met campus-wide
  • 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity is
    participated in during the school day
  • PE and Nutrition curricula are taught
  • Schools are free of advertising
  • School policies and practices promoting healthy
    environment are developed and practiced

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies,
Preventing Childhood Obesity Health in the
Balance. 2005 Fact Sheet. Preventing Childhood
Obesity The Role of Schools http//www.iom.edu/re
port.asp?id22596
41
Michigans Consensus For Addressing Childhood
Weight Issues
Order or download at www.emc.cmich.edu/healthy
weight/
42
Overall Philosophy of Recommendations
  1. Healthy Students Of All Shapes And Sizes
  2. The Primary Role Of Schools Is Prevention
  3. Schools Should Go Beyond Prevention Only If
    Safeguards Are In Place

43
The Michigan Healthy Weight Concept Model
44
Consensus Paper Prevention Recommendations
  • Create A Coordinated School Health Team
  • Conduct An Assessment
  • Plan Improvements

45
Healthy School Action Tool
  • Combines SHI And CTS
  • Format Is Simple
  • Michigan Specific Questions
  • All State Level Partners Promoting
  • Launched At Michigan Action For Healthy Kids
    Coalition Meeting (March 2004)

46

Healthy School Action Tool
47


www.mihealthtools.org
48
HSAT
  • Combines SHI And CTS
  • Format Is Simple
  • Michigan Specific Questions
  • All State Level Partners Promoting
  • Launched At Michigan Action For Healthy Kids
    Coalition Meeting
  • Training for facilitators

49
Components of Coordinated School Health Teams
  1. Family and Community Involvement
  2. Comprehensive School Health Education
  3. Physical Education
  4. School Health Services
  • Counseling, Psychological, Social Services
  • School Nutrition Services
  • Healthy School Environment
  • School-site Health Promotion for Staff

50
HSAT Purpose
  • Create a CSHT
  • Identify Strengths
  • Identify Weaknesses
  • Develop an Action Plan
  • Make Policy and Environmental
    Changes

51
(No Transcript)
52
HSAT Grants
  • Small number offered annually since 1999
    provided
  • Competitive funding up to 1,000
  • Facilitator If Needed
  • Technical Assistance
  • Resources

53
HSAT Modules
  1. Introduction
  2. Questions
  3. Score
  4. Creating a Action Plan
  5. Taking Action

54
Results Successes
55
Physical EducationPhysical Activity
56
  • While NCLB does not address qualifications
    needed to teach physical education, the Michigan
    state legislation and Michigan state board policy
    clearly address the issue.

57
State of Michigan
  • Requires physical education certification to
    teach PE.
  • Requires passing physical education certification
    examination.
  • Has adopted the Quality Physical Education
    Policy.

58
Michigans Current State LawOn Physical
Education
  • (1) Health and physical education for pupils of
    both sexes shall be established and provided in
    all public schools of this state. Subject to
    subsection (2), each pupil attending public
    school in this state who is physically fit and
    capable of doing so shall take the course in
    physical education.

59
Michigans Current State LawOn Physical
Education
  • (2) A school district may credit a pupils
    participation in extracurricular athletics or
    other extracurricular activities involving
    physical activity as meeting the physical
    education requirement for the pupil under
    subsection (1).
  • School Code Sec. 380.1502 revised 1-9-96

60
  • Policy On Quality Physical Education
  • New policy passed by the State Board of Education
    in October 2003.
  • The State Board of Education recommends that all
    public schools offer physical education
    opportunities that include components of a
    quality physical education program.
  • A quality PE program addresses curriculum,
    instruction, and assessment.

61
Legislative
  • Senator Cherry is sponsoring Bill 57
  • The Board of a school district or Board of
    Directors of a Public School Academy that
    operates an elementary school shall ensure that
    all of its pupils enrolled in the elementary
    grades participate in at least 30 minutes of
    physical activity per school day or 135 minutes
    of physical activity per school week.
    Participation in physical activities as part of
    the physical education curriculum may be counted
    to meet this requirement.

62
Contact
  • American Heart Association
  • www.capitolconnect.com/yourethecure
  • follow the prompts to register.

63
State of Michigan
  • Has established physical education content
    standards and benchmarks.
  • Is currently working on grade level content
    expectations. (GLCE)

64
  • Grade Level Content Expectations
  • (GLCE)
  • Aligned Content Expectations are a further
    breakdown of the current K-12 content standards
    benchmarks. Developed for each content area.
  • Prioritized to meet the needs of various P.E.
    programs.
  • Aligned with EPEC.
  • Currently in review process.

65
Exemplary Physical Education Curriculum
EPEC
The EPEC Physically Educated Person
66
EPEC Curriculum/Instruction
  • 6-12 materials
  • K-5 materials

67
State of Michigan
  • Currently working on linking physical education
    to the 11 indicators of engagement in
    EducationYes!

68
  • EducationYes!
  • Is Michigans Plan To Help School Districts
    Achieve No Child Left Behind Standards.
  • Education Yes! includes eleven indicators of
    engagement that schools need to identify when
    completing their school self-assessment.
    Unfortunately physical education was not
    mentioned anywhere in the indicators.
  • Links were made to show how physical education
    correlates to the eleven indicators.
  • This document is in its final stages of
    completion.

69
Brain Breaks
  • Cross curricular collaboration!
  • Physical activity in the classroom related to
    curriculum!
  • We know that students who are physically active
    are more alert and have better concentration.
  • Research has shown that brain development is
    related to movement and the development of motor
    skills

70
Brain Breaks
  • Research shows that school-based
  • physical activity programs can help students
    increase concentration, reduce disruptive
    behaviors, and improve scores in mathematics,
    reading and writing. 3-5
  • Research also suggests a critical link
    relationship among movement/attention, spatial
    perception, and learning/memory in youth and
    adults, including those with special needs.6-7

71
PA/PE Impact on Learning
  • Physical Activity
  • Improves self image
  • Stimulates chemicals within the brain that
    improve mood
  • Reduces stress and anxiety
  • Can significantly improve behavior
  • A study at the State University of New York at
    Buffalo showed that exercise significantly
    improved behavior. Children ages 5-12 diagnosed
    with ADHD participated in 40 minutes of exercise,
    five days per week. Significant behavior was
    evident in as few as 3 weeks.

72
Recess contributes to social/emotional growth
  • Recess is one of the most popular responses
  • children give for coming to school.
  • It is an outlet for reducing/lowering anxiety.
  • It provides an opportunity for solitary play.
  • Is an opportunity for different cultures to learn
    from each other.
  • It encourages children to interact cooperatively.
  • It provides the opportunity for an assessment of
    a childs peer relationships.

73
Recess contributes to a childs cognitive
intellectual needs
  • It provides the opportunity to pump fresh oxygen
    into the body.
  • Students who do not get a break are much more
    fidgety in the classroom.
  • It provides an opportunity to learn from others.
  • It provides a chance for exploration
    creativity.

74
Recess addresses a childs physical needs
  • Physical activity is essential for the healthy
    growth development of a child.
  • Recess provides opportunities for children to
    explore types of play regardless of gender
    stereotypes.
  • Recess allows children to learn about their
    bodies capabilities.

75
www.saferoutesmichigan.org
  • Safe Routes to School
  • is a national movement to make it safe,
    convenient and fun for children to bicycle and
    walk to school.
  • Develops school teams of stakeholders
  • Identifies safety hazards around schools
  • Assesses parent and student opinions
  • Makes recommendations to improve safety
  • Educates students and parents on biking and
    walking safely
  • Promotes physical activity and good nutrition
  • Builds community awareness
  • Provides schools with easy-to-use toolkit

76
PE Updates
  • Physical Education LISTSERV
  • This listserv will help you stay informed on key
    issues in physical education in the State of
    Michigan.  
  • To subscribe go to www.state.mi.us/listserv/subs
    cribe.html

77
PE Updates
  • Michigan Association for Health, Physical
    Education, Recreation and Dance
  • Join MAHPERD!!!
  • Get Involved!
  • www.mimahperd.org

78
PE Updates
  • Professional Development
  • EPEC Trainings
  • See www.michiganfitness.org for dates and
    locations.
  • AAHPERD National Convention in Chicago! April
    12-16, 2005 www.aahperd.org.
  • MAHPERD State Convention in Traverse City Nov.
    1719, 2005 www.mimapherd.org.

79
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80
Resources
  • Michigan Department of Education Physical
    Education web page http//www.michigan.gov/mde/0
    ,1607,7-140-28753_29234---,00.html
  • Or go to michigan.gov/mde
  • On the left side of the page, click on K-12
    curriculum.
  • On the left side of the page, click on physical
    education.
  • Brain Breakswww.emc.cmich.edu

81
  • Presented by
  • Nick Drzal, MPH, RD
  • Nutrition Education Consultant
  • Michigan Department of Education
  • Phone 517-335-1730
  • Fax 517- 373-12333
  • Email drzaln_at_michigan.gov
  • Trina Boyle Holmes
  • Physical Education Consultant
  • Michigan Department of Education
  • Phone 517-373-4582
  • Fax 517- 373-12333
  • Email Boyle-HolmesT_at_michigan.gov
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