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NON-VIOLENT PHYSICAL CRISIS INTERVENTION: DE-ESCALATION TRAINING Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI)

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Title: NON-VIOLENT PHYSICAL CRISIS INTERVENTION: DE-ESCALATION TRAINING Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI)


1
NON-VIOLENT PHYSICAL CRISIS INTERVENTION DE-ESCAL
ATION TRAINING Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI)
  • Aiken County Public School District (ACPSD)
  • Cheryl Fischer, MS, LPC
  • Program Specialist Behavior and Social Skills
  • Ameet Boleigh, ED.s, NCSP
  • School Psychologist CIL _at_ Pinecrest

2
WHAT Is Crisis Prevention Intervention CPI?
  • CPI Training
  • Focuses on learning skills to enable you to
    defuse a potentially violent individual BEFORE
    they become assaultive. It is a two day training
  • Recognized world wide
  • Offered throughout the school year
  • To register, call 641-2624

3
BASED ON THE CONCEPT OF THE INTERGRATED EXPERIENCE
  • INTERGRATED EXPERIENCE
  • The concept that our behaviors and attitudes
    impact the behaviors and attitudes of those
    around us and vice versa.
  • By changing our behaviors and attitudes in any
    situation, we can influence the behaviors and
    attitudes of others.

4
CPI CRISIS DEVELOPMENTAL MODEL
Integrated Experience
Crisis Development Staff Attitudes/Responses
1) Anxiety 1) Supportive
2) Defensive 2) Directive
3) Acting out person 3) Non-violent Physical Crisis Intervention
4) Tension reduction 4) Therapeutic rapport
We will not be covering the Acting out Person ?
Non-Violent Physical Crisis Intervention stages.
This information involves training provided in a
2 day seminar.
To Nonverbal Behavior
5
CPI CRISIS DEVELOPMENT MODEL
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Crisis Development Staff Attitudes/Responses
1) Anxiety A noticeable increase or decrease in a persons behavior Examples Pacing Finger drumming Writing of the hands Staring 1) Supportive Acknowledging that change in behavior and being of assistance An empathetic, non-judgmental approach attempting to alleviate anxiety
6
EMPATHIC LISTENING
  • EMPATHIC LISTENING
  • Active process to discern what a person is saying
  • Key elements of empathic listening
  • 1. Be non-judgmental.
  • 2. Undivided attention.
  • 3. Listen for the real message.
  • 4. Allow silence for reflection.
  • 5. Use restatement to clarify messages.

Back to CPI Crisis Developmental Model
7
CPI CRISIS DEVELOPMENT MODEL
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Crisis Development Staff Attitudes/Responses
2) Defensive The beginning state of loss of rationality. At this stage, the individual becomes belligerent and verbally challenges authority. Examples Cussing Name calling Verbal threats 2) Directive An approach in which a staff member takes control of a potentially escalating situation by setting limits, restating directives
8
CRISIS DEVELOPMENT MODEL
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Crisis Development Staff Attitudes/Responses
4) Tension Reduction Decrease in physical and emotional energy output, which occurs after a person has acted out Characterized by regaining of rationality Individual calms down 4) Therapeutic Rapport An attempt to re-establish communication with an individual who is in the tension reduction stage
9
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR
  • Proxemics (Personal Space)
  • The area around an individual that is comfortable
    (1 3 feet)
  • Space seen as an extension of ones self
  • Things that make a difference in ones proxemics
  • Gender
  • Height
  • Attitude
  • Facing someone
  • Seated vs. Standing
  • Culture
  • What else? How about personal information?
  • Kinesics (Body Language)
  • The way we communicate non-verbally through body
    language, posture, expression, motion, etc.

10
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR
  • PROXEMICS (Personal Space) EXERCISE
  • Form two lines facing each other
  • Demonstration
  • One line approach the other letting the
    approaching line know when to stop
  • Reverse roles
  • Describe feelings

11
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR
  • KINESICS (Body Language) EXERCISE
  • Two lines facing each other with different
    partners
  • Demonstration
  • Approach partner, stopping one leg length away
  • Take a large step toward partner and hold for 6
    seconds
  • Take a small step toward partner and hold for 6
    seconds
  • Take one step back and pivot to side, forming
    L-shape with partner. This is the CPI supportive
    stance.
  • Describe feelings behaviors
  • Reverse roles

12
NONVERBAL BEHAVIOR
  • REASONS FOR USING STANCE
  • 1. Safety
  • 2. Respect
  • 3. Non-challenging (or threatening)

13
PARAVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • How we say what we say
  • The link between verbal and nonverbal
  • The vocal part of speech, excluding the actual
    words one uses
  • Paraverbal communication helps us not send mixed
    messages
  • Paraverbal communication is to the spoken word,
    what punctuation is to the written word

14
PARAVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • THREE COMPONENTS OF PARAVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • 1. TONE
  • Avoid inflections of impatience, condescension,
    inattention, etc.
  • 2. VOLUME
  • Appropriate for distance and situation
  • 3. CADENCE
  • Use an even rate and rhythm slow down speech
    and slow down thought processes

15
PARAVERBAL COMMUNICATION
  • PARAVERBAL COMMUNICATION EXERCISE
  • Tone
  • Volume
  • Cadence
  • What are some of your experiences with each of
    these components of paraverbal communication?
  • What is the relationship between paraverbal
    communication and an individual escalating?
  • How does an individuals paraverbal communication
    sign affect appropriate staff responses on the
    crises development continuum?

16
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
17
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Verbal Escalation Stage Staff Intervention/Response
1) Questioning Two Types of Questions 1) Information Seeking 2) Challenging 1) Answer information seeking questions 2) Ignore challenging questions and redirect and set limits
18
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Verbal Escalation Stage Staff Intervention/Response
2) Refusal Non-compliance Slight loss of rationalization Redirect and set limits Be mindful of your proxemics and kinesics as it can either escalate or de-escalate a situation
19
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Verbal Escalation Stage Staff Intervention/Response
3) Release Acting-out, emotional outburst Loss of rationalization Venting Screaming Sweating HIGH energy output Allow venting Remove audience or acting out individual When the individual calms down and is responsive, state directives Enforce limits
20
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Verbal Escalation Stage Staff Intervention/Response
4) Intimidation Two Types of Intimidation 1) Verbal 2) Non-verbal 1) Seek assistance 2) Take all threats seriously 3) Document, document, document
21
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
Verbal Escalation Stage Staff Intervention/Response
5) Tension Reduction Decrease in emotional and physical energy Re-establish communication and therapeutic rapport Is this a good time to present a disciplinary referral or verbally reprimand the individual?
22
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
  • KEYS TO SETTING LIMITS
  • Setting limits offers a person choices and states
    the consequences of those choices
  • Offer positive choices and consequences first
  • Allow time to process (recall the loss of
    rationality)
  • Limits are most effective when they are
  • 1) Simple/Clear
  • 2) Reasonable
  • 3) Enforceable

Back to Verbal Escalation Continuum
23
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
  • VERBAL INTERVENTION TIPS AND TECHNIQUES THAT
    WORK
  • Give time to process
  • Remain calm
  • Give an out
  • Non-confrontational
  • Explain
  • Isolate the situation
  • Be realistic
  • Empathy
  • Restate directives
  • Redirect and set limits
  • Listen
  • Be aware of both self and individuals
    non-verbals (proxemics and kinesics)
  • Be consistent

24
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
  • VERBAL INTERVENTION TIPS AND TECHNIQUES THAT
    MIGHT WORK
  • Humor
  • Sarcasm
  • Touch

25
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
  • VERBAL INTERVENTION TIPS AND TECHNIQUES DOESNT
    WORK
  • Overreacting
  • Getting into power struggles
  • Yelling
  • Begging
  • Being threatening
  • Preaching
  • Making false promises
  • Name-calling
  • Faking attention
  • Using jargon (confuses and frustrates)

26
VERBAL ESCALATION CONTINUUM
  • EMPATHIC LISTENING
  • Active process of discerning what a person is
    saying
  • Key Elements of Empathetic Listening
  • 1. Be non-judgmental.
  • 2. Allow silence for reflection.
  • 3. Give undivided attention.
  • 4. Use restatement to clarify messages
  • 5. Listen for the real message

Back to CPI Crisis Developmental Model
27
PRECIPITATING FACTORS, RATIONAL DETACHMENT,
INTEGRATED EXPERIENCE
  • PRECIPITATING FACTORS
  • Internal or external causes of an acting out
    behavior over which a staff member has little or
    no control
  • What are some examples of precipitating factors?
    Work within your groups and present ideas

28
PRECIPITATING FACTORS
  • Home Environment
  • Abuse, Neglect ltDSS Reportinggt
  • Food (lack of, too much, or junk food)
  • Lack of sleep
  • Other caregivers in home-boyfriends,
    grandparents, stepparents
  • Medical problems
  • Kids that work
  • No stable or adequate place to live
  • Divorce
  • Death
  • Parents in jail

29
PRECIPITATING FACTORS
  • Medication (not taking it, not having it, taking
    too much)
  • Parental Involvement (too little, too much)
  • Latch Key Children
  • Excessive Absences
  • Too much responsibility on kids, on school
  • Loss of Personal Power
  • Need to Maintain Self-Esteem
  • Fear, Failure
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Attention-Seeking
  • Displaced Anger
  • Psychological Causes
  • Full Moon

30
RATIONAL DETACHMENT
  • RATIONAL DETACHMENT
  • The ability to remain calm and professional, in
    control of your behavior and not take the acting
    out behavior personally.
  • Cant control precipitating factors, but can
    control own responses to acting out behaviors.
  • Maintain professional attitude so can control
    the situation without overreacting.
  • Find positive outlets for negative energy
    absorbed from acting out person.

31
WAYS TO HELP RATIONAL DETACHMENT
  • PREVENTION
  • Exercise
  • Hobbies
  • Crisis Plan
  • Time Out
  • Sports
  • Vacation
  • Vent with Friends
  • Driving
  • Music
  • Massage
  • Training
  • Fun with Family

32
WAYS TO HELP RATIONAL DETACHMENT
  • INTERVENTION
  • Whose mud puddle (issue) is it?
  • Self-talk
  • Breathe
  • Avoid power struggle
  • Leave other problems at the door
  • Take a step back
  • Get help Use the team
  • Implement plan

33
WAYS TO HELP RATIONAL DETACHMENT
  • POSTVENTION
  • Debrief and focus on good and bad and how to
    improve
  • Celebrate successes
  • Documentation
  • Let it go!!!
  • More training and practice
  • Evaluate plans again

34
POSTVENTION
  • Re-establish communication with student
  • Determine if they are calm and in control
  • Discuss what happened
  • Identify triggers
  • Agree on alternative behaviors
  • This is your teachable moment!
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