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Train%20the%20Trainer:%20Supporting%20Employees%20with%20Military%20Background

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Train the Trainer: Supporting Employees with Military Background Dawn Marie Klug, LPC, CEAP Renee Evans, Ph.D, LPC * – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Train%20the%20Trainer:%20Supporting%20Employees%20with%20Military%20Background


1
Train the Trainer Supporting Employees with
Military Background
  • Dawn Marie Klug, LPC, CEAP
  • Renee Evans, Ph.D, LPC

2
Goal
  • Participants will gain an overall
    understanding about the importance of retaining
    employees with military backgrounds once they are
    hired and how to train and consult with
    supervisors to support this effort.

3
Objectives
  • To gain a better understanding about the need to
    focus on employees with military backgrounds
  • To better prepare EA professionals to provide
    consultations on the impact of military culture
    and the deployment cycle on the workforce
  • To enable EA Professionals to provide
    consultation and address performance issues and
    workplace conflicts that may arise in regards to
    employees with military background
  • To offer a 30-45 minute presentation template to
    present to workplace leaders on effective
    management of employees with military backgrounds.

4
The United States Armed Forces
  • An all Volunteer Force
  • Active Duty Component (AD) - Air Force, Army,
    Coast Guard, Marine Corp, and Navy
  • Reserve Component (RC) - Air Force Reserve, Army
    Reserve, Coast Guard Reserve, Marine Reserve,
    Navy Reserve, Air National Guard, Army National
    Guard
  • 2.1 million service members have served in Iraq
    and Afghanistan
  • Coast Guard is part of the Department of
    Homeland Security not the Department of Defense

5
The United States Armed Forces
  • Active Duty 1.46M Service Members
  • 66 aged 30 and younger
  • 56 are married
  • 1.86M family members
  • 1.2M children
  • Reserve Component 846,000 service members
  • 51 aged 30 and younger
  • 49 are married
  • 1.11M family members
  • 730,000 children
  • 28 aged 5 years and younger
  • Taken From Demographics 2009 Profile of the
    Military Community http//www.militaryhomefront.
    dod.mil/12038/Project20Documents/MilitaryHOMEFRON
    T/QOL20Resources/Reports/2009_Demographics_Report
    .pdf

6
The United States Armed Forces
  • In 2004 Women Consisted of
  • 6 of Marines
  • 15 of Soldiers and Sailors
  • 20 of Airmen
  • 11 of the Coast Guard
  • Click here to learn more
  • http//www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/demographics/FY0520
    Army20Profile.pdf
  • http//www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/docs/demographics/fy
    0420navy20profile.pdf
  • http//www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/docs/demographics/FY
    0420Marine20Corps20Profile.pdf
  • http//www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/docs/demographics/FY
    0420Air20Force20Profile.pdf
  • http//www.armyg1.army.mil/hr/docs/demographics/FY
    0420Coast20Guard20Profile.pdf

7
Impact of Military Culture in the Workplace
  • Regimen/Structured
  • Experienced
  • Diverse skills
  • Deployment cycle
  • Adjustment to civilian work setting
  • Sometimes want to mask military affiliation

8
Seek First to Understand
  • As with all diversity issues, valuing and not
    just tolerating people of diverse backgrounds is
    an essential skill for managers and Human
    Resources
  • As an EA professional, having an understanding
    of, and appreciation for the experiences of
    someone from a military background will help in
    serving the client company

9
There is a Need to Focus on this Population of
Employees
  • Workplace Issues
  • More and more employees are hindered from doing
    their jobs productively by personal problems, and
    industry is realizing that it is not only
    humanitarian but cost-effective to take more
    responsibility than it has in the past for
    helping employees solve these problems (Masi,
    1984, p.5). As a result, todays HR
    professionals are faced with more issues than
    were faced 10 years ago (Hale, Evans, Hodiak,
    2008) when addressing employees issues.

10
There is a Need to Focus on this Population of
Employees
  • Workplace Issues
  • According to the Prohofsky (2005), On any given
    workday, an estimated one million people are
    absent from work due to stress.
  • 8 of employees say that they feel stress on the
    job. The number of employees who call in sick due
    to stress has tripled in the last four years.
  • Each year, an estimated 20 million lost work days
    are attributable to employee depression and
    mental health is a major reason for absence..
  •  

11
There is a Need to Focus on this Population of
Employees
  • Workplace Issues
  • There is no reason to not believe that these
    employee concerns do not include service members
    and veterans who have reintegrated back into the
    workplace due to service-related issues that has
    also contributed to the above issues.
  • HR professionals and other members of management
    must address these issues in order to improve
    retention of employees with military backgrounds
    which in turn will increase employee motivation,
    and reduce turnover.
  • The EAP is the key resource for addressing these
    issues in order to meet the needs of the client
    employee and the client company

12
Employment Issues of Veterans
  • Unemployment Rate for Veterans has been higher
    than the general population at 8.3 in June 2012,
    the highest in 2012 was May 12.7
  • There has been tremendous effort to promote the
    benefits of hiring veterans in the workplace to
    assist both employers and job seekers from
    military backgrounds.
  • USERRA protects civilian job rights and benefits
    for veterans and members of the active and
    Reserve components of the U.S. armed forces.
    USERRA provides that returning service-members
    must be promptly reemployed in the same position
    that they would have attained had they not been
    absent for military service, with the same
    seniority, status and pay, as well as other
    rights and benefits determined by seniority
    (Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment
    Rights Act (USERRA))
  • http//www.dol.gov/vets/programs/userra/

13
Considerations When Preparing to Train Your
Supervisors
  • Understand that all supervisors may not
    understand military culture and may not know
    anyone serving in the military
  • As a result, these supervisors may not have an
    awareness about the importance of being
    considerate of, and working with employees with
    military backgrounds
  • Understand that supervisors may or may not be
    aware of their company policy around supporting
    employees with military backgrounds
  • Understand that some companies may or may not
    have policies around supporting employees with
    military backgrounds





14
Considerations When Preparing to Train Your
Supervisors
  • Understand that the best way to help managers
    understand how to support employees with
    military backgrounds may be through the companys
    diversity policy (if they have one).
  • Be aware that some supervisors may have biases
    and stereotypes about employees with military.
    How do you plan to address this if it occurs?
  • Understand that supervisors may not understand
    why this is an important topic and how supporting
    employees with military backgrounds might
    directly impact employee productivity, morale,
    motivation, attendance, and the bottom line. So,
    may need explain this to them.

15
Considerations When Preparing to Train Your
Supervisors
  • It will be important to speak in the supervisors
    language. Therefore, may need to address
    productivity, workplace performance issues,
    individual performance issues, loss of time, etc.
  • Want to come across as supportive and not
    accusatory of supervisors.

16
How does Retention Fit into This?
  • This is a diversity issue Employers who do not
    have a formal policy related to recruiting
    veterans may focus on the need to have a diverse
    workforce.
  • EAP can play a vital role in helping employers to
    retain and support employees with military
    backgrounds
  • May assist with understanding policy and
    procedures that support employees with military
    background

17
How does Retention Fit into This?
  • Losing employees directly impacts a companys
    bottom line
  • When employees feel valued and supported, this
    directly impacts employee morale, motivation,
    absenteeism, and productivity positively
  • This is the case for all employees

18
Helping Managers Understand their Policies and
Procedures
  • Understand that supervisors may not be aware the
    Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment
    Rights Act (USERRA)) Therefore, will need
    encourage them to contact Human Resources within
    their organization whenever USERRA may apply.
  • http//www.dol.gov/vets/programs/userra/
  • Questions to ask a manager
  • Does your organization have a policy on giving
    priority or preference to employees with military
    backgrounds?
  • Does your organization work with local or
    national groups to recruit employees with
    military backgrounds?
  • Have you talked with Human Resources about any
    potential ADA or USERRA concerns?

19
Helping Managers Understand the Law ADA
  • Understanding and supporting employees based on
    this policy speaks to the value of the employee
    in the workplace.
  • Veterans with Disabilities are protected under
    ADA and USERRA
  • Employers may not make hiring decisions based on
    real disabilities or assumptions about
    disabilities or medical conditions
  • Employers may ask if applicant is disabled
    veteran to determine eligibility for affirmative
    action
  • USERRA requires employers to go further than the
    ADA by making reasonable efforts to assist a
    veteran who is returning to employment to become
    qualified for a job whether or not the veteran
    has a service-connected disability.
    (http//www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/ada_veteran
    s_employers.cfm)
  • Human Resources should always be included if
    there is a concern about ADA or accommodations
    are being considered.

20
Real Life Scenario A
  • A manager contacts the EAP for consultation and
    reports the following issue An employee who
    works in a cubicle and has been on two tours in
    Iraq, is described as being jumpy when
    approached by other employees in his workspace.
    He has also been slower to complete work and is
    less accurate than he was before active duty in
    the military. When his manager asks him if he is
    comfortable in his workspace he reports to her
    that he feels as though people are sneaking up
    on me and he is having difficulty focusing on
    his tasks.
  • What consultation do you provide to the
    supervisor?

21
Real Life Scenario B
  • A manager contacts the EAP for consultation and
    reports the following issue An employee who has
    been deployed twice in the last year and has been
    gone from work for more than 6 months returns to
    work and his first day returning requests a
    vacation so he can spend time with his family.
    The supervisor knows that the other employees are
    anxious for this employee to return because they
    have been covering his assignments and overtime
    while he was gone.
  • What consultation do you provide to the
    supervisor?

22
Real Life Scenario C
  • A manager calls you with a concern because she
    just met with an employee related to a first time
    warning that her job performance is suffering,
    missing deadlines and poorer quality work. The
    manager stated that the employee responded by
    telling her that she just cant focus because she
    worrying about her daughter who is deployed in
    the military. The manager stated that she was so
    worried about the employee she did not continue
    the disciplinary action, and now she wonders if
    she did the right thing.
  • What consultation do you provide to the manager?

23
Real Life Scenario D
  • A manager contacts the EAP for consultation and
    reports the following issue an employee just
    came to her with a copy of an email from a
    co-worker with a military background. The
    co-worker has signed the email V/R and has used
    some language or jargon that the employee doesnt
    understand. The employee complained that she
    always talks so strange and is so ridged, it
    makes me uncomfortable. The manager admits to
    you that she has the same experience of this
    employee and that she has wondered what V/R means
    but was uncomfortable asking.
  • What consultation do you provide to the manager?

24
We Must Continue to Educate Ourselves
  • As with all workplace diversity issues, EA
    Professionals need to continue to educate
    ourselves and expand our understanding as the
    workplace evolves. It is vital that you continue
    to learn about employees with a military
    background.
  • Citizen Soldier Support Program and AHEC
    http//www.aheconnect.com/citizensoldier/
  • Center for Deployment Psychology
    http//deploymentpsych.org/training/online-courses

25
We Must Continue to Educate Ourselves
  • Resources available to assist veterans and
    employer
  • http//www.americasherosatwork.gov
  • http//www.esgr.org/site
  • www.askjan.org
  • http//www.uschamber.com/veterans
  • What about your community? Many communities have
    local programs that provide direct services to
    veterans who are in or will be in the workforce.

26
Wrapping Up
  • Other questions/Comments
  • Thank you!!
  • Dawn M. Klug, MS/LPC/CEAP Director of Operations,
    EAN dawn_at_eannc.com
  • Renee Evans, Ph.D/LPC Licensed Professional
    Counselor and Consultant revans6_at_bellsouth.net

27
References
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    programs. New York American Management
    Associations. Pg 5.
  • Hale, J., Evans, R., Hodiak, E. G.
    (Fall/Winter, 2008). Levering value in your
    employee assistance programs. North Carolina HR
    Review, 11-12.
  • Prohofsky, J. (Summer, 2005). Bridging the gap
    Communicating employee assistance to your CEO.
    EAP Digest, 16-18.
  • Mansfield, A., Kaufman, J., Marshall, S, Gaynes,
    B., Morrissey, J. Engel, C. (2010). Deployment
    and the use of mental health services among U.S.
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  • workplace. University of North Carolina Citizen
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    Definition and Background (http//www.polytrauma.
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28
Reference Continued
  • Gibbs, D. Martin, S. Kupper, L. Johnson, R
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    Families During Combat-Related Deployments.
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  • Clinical Psychology Review 30 (2010) 595607
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    accessed 11/28/11
  • GAO (2007). Military Personnel Additional
    Actions Needed to Improve Oversight of Reserve
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    7259.pdf Accessed 11/28/11
  • IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2010. Returning Home
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    Assisting Combat Veterans with Hearing Loss.
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  • Brunson, J. G. 2010MH/SA Issues Technology
    Assisting Combat Veterans with Hearing
    Loss.Presented at the Governors Focus on
    Returning Veterans, Raleigh N.C.
  • Brunson, J. G. 2010MH/SA Issues Technology
    Assisting Combat Veterans with Hearing Loss.
    Presented at the Governors Focus on Returning
    Veterans, Raleigh N.C.
  • (2011) . FOCUS (Families Overcoming Under
    Stress). A collaboration of BUMED UCLA Semel
    Institute. Presentation for AHEC Military Family
    Issues March 28th 2011 Presented by Linda Havens.
  • (2011) . FOCUS (Families Overcoming Under
    Stress). A collaboration of BUMED UCLA Semel
    Institute. Presentation for AHEC Military
    Family Issues March 28th 2011, Presented by
    Linda Havens.
  • (2011) FOCUS (Families Overcoming Under
    Stress). A collaboration of BUMED UCLA Semel
    Institute. Presentation for AHEC Military
    Family Issues March 28th 2011 Presented by Linda
    Havens..
  • (2011) . FOCUS (Families Overcoming Under
    Stress). A collaboration of BUMED UCLA Semel
    Institute. Presentation for AHEC Military
    Family Issues March 28th 2011 Presented by Linda
    Havens.
  • Jones, J. (2011) Rate of Homeless Female
    Veterans rises Near Fort Brag NPR.
    http//www.npr.org/2011/09/15/140490523/rate-of-ho
    meless-female-vets-rises-in-fayetteville-n-c
    Accesed March 27, 2012
  • ADDITIONAL REFERENCE
  • Aamodt, M. G. (2004). Applied industrial/organizat
    ional psychology (4th ed.). Australia
    Thomas/Wadsworth.
  • Hale, J., Evans, R., Hodiak, E. G.
    (Fall/Winter, 2008). Levering value in your
    employee assistance programs. North Carolina HR
    Review, 11-12.
  • D. A. Masi (1984). Designing employee assistance
    programs. New York American Management
    Associations.
  • Myers, D. W. (1984). Establishing and building
    employee assistance programs. Connecticut Quorum
    Books.
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