We are waiting for Apu. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – We are waiting for Apu. PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 82d827-OGQwM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

We are waiting for Apu.

Description:

We are waiting for Apu. Apu is from India. Same thing in different sentences. D.O. Subj . We are waiting for Apu, Apu is from India. is from India. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:50
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 17
Provided by: Capl49
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: We are waiting for Apu.


1
(No Transcript)
2
We are waiting for Apu.
Same thing in different sentences.
Apu is from India.
3
We are waiting for Apu,
Apu is from India.
4
The two sentences can be linked into one. We use
a relative pronoun to substitute the common item
and join the two sentences in one.
We are waiting for Apu ,
is from
India.
who
We are waiting for Apu, who is from India.
Subordinate/Dependent clause Its meaning is
incomplete if we remove the main clause.
Main /independent clause If we remove the
subordinate clause from the sentence, its meaning
is still complete.
5
LINKING WORDS
6
LINKING WORDS
7
Two types of relative clauses
  • Non-Defining
  • Extra information about a noun in a sentence
  • The new Woody Allen film, which I saw last
    week, is very good.
  • Use commas
  • Always use a relative pronoun
  • who/whom ,which whose, where, when
  • Defining
  • Essential information about a noun in a sentence
  • Youre the man (that) I saw last week.
  • No commas
  • Can omit pronoun if it is not the SUBJECT of the
    relative clause
  • That (informal) can replace which / who/ when /
    why but not where, whose or whom

8
Defining relative clauses No commas
  • A defining relative clause identifies which
    person or thing we mean exactly.
  • It cannot be left out of the sentence or the
    meaning of the sentence is incomplete
  • Its the book that I read yesterday.
  • Its the book. (this sentence is incomplete)

9
Defining relative clauses No commas
  • You can omit the pronoun if it is the OBJECT of
    the relative clause (if there is a SUBJECT and a
    VERB after the relative pronoun )
  • Its the book that I read yesterday? (omit)
  • Its the book I read yesterday.
  • The girl who lives next door is French.
  • We can never omit WHOSE and WHERE

10
Non-defining relative clauses with commas
  • This kind of clause gives additional information
    about a person or thing.
  • The sentence still makes sense without the
    non-defining relative clause
  • My neighbour, who studies engineering, is very
    noisy.
  • My neighbour is very noisy.

11
Formal / Informal
  • Non-Defining relative clauses (with commas) are
    more common in written English because they are
    quite formal.
  • In spoken English we would probably use two
    sentences.
  • Compare
  • Elvis Presley, who has sold over one billion
    albums, died of prescription drug abuse.
    written
  • with
  • Elvis has sold over a billion albums. He died of
    an overdose. spoken

12
Verb preposition
  • When the verb is followed by a preposition in the
    relative clause we can use two structures
  • The woman is a lawyer. I spoke to a woman
  • Formal Preposition rel.pronoun
  • The woman to whom I spoke is a lawyer.
  • (We cant omit the relative pronoun after a
    preposition)
  • Or
  • Informal Preposition after the verb
  • The woman (who) I spoke to is a lawyer.

13
Relative Adverbs Time when or in/on/at which
or that
  • That was the year when/that/in which I got my
    degree.
  • 11 September 2001 was the day when/that/on which
    peoples attitude towards terrorism changed.
  • The adverb (when) can be omitted.
  • 11 September 2001 was the day peoples
    attitude towards terrorism changed.

14
Relative Adverbs Place where or
  • in/on/at which or that
  • Thats the factory where/in which they make
    chemicals.
  • Thats the spot where/on which the battle took
    place.
  • The adverb (where) cannot generally be omitted.

15
Relative Adverbs Reason why (for which)
  • I will explain the reasons why /for which the
    accident occurred
  • The adverb (why) can be omitted.
  • I will explain the reasons the accident occurred

16
Relative pronouns Possessive whose
  • It takes the place of his, her, their or a noun
    in possessive case s.
  • Andy Warhol was a pop artist whose paintings are
    famous worldwide.(His paintings are famous)
  • Charlie, whose sister lives in London,
  • is travelling to England this summer. (Charlies
    sister lives in London).
About PowerShow.com