Have you ever seen any live theater productions? Make a list of any plays or musicals that you have seen performed on stage or been a part of. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Have you ever seen any live theater productions? Make a list of any plays or musicals that you have seen performed on stage or been a part of.

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Renaissance actor, poet and ... Life in the Theater By ... most commonly used phrases 10% of the vocabulary used in Shakespearean plays were new words The Globe ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Have you ever seen any live theater productions? Make a list of any plays or musicals that you have seen performed on stage or been a part of.


1
Warm-Up
  • Have you ever seen any live theater
    productions? Make a list of any plays or
    musicals that you have seen performed on stage or
    been a part of.
  • What are some of the elements that go into
    pulling off a professional theater production?

2
Romeo and Juliet Background
"He was not of an age, but for all time!"
Renaissance actor, poet and playwright Ben
Jonson on the work of his friend (and rival),
William Shakespeare
3
Background to William Shakespeare
4
William Shakespeare Biography
  • William Shakespeare was born in April of 1564 in
    Stratford on Avon in England. Only a baptism
    record exists for William on April 26 of 1564.
    The 23rd is his accepted birthday.
  • He married Anne Hathaway on November 28, 1582.
    William was 18 at the time, and Anne was 26 (and
    pregnant!).

5
Life in the Theater
  • By 1594, he was acting and writing for the Lord
    Chamberlins Men, a theater troop in London.
  • Shakespeare made much more money in his lifetime
    as an actor, not a playwright.

6
Shakespeares Death
  • William Shakespeare died on April 23rd of 1616,
    his alleged birthday.
  • He wrote the epitaph on his tombstone and it
    contains a curse!

7
Shakespeares Impact on English
  • Wild Goose Chase
  • Break the Ice
  • All of a Sudden
  • Love is Blind
  • Flesh and Blood
  • Full Circle
  • Kill with Kindness
  • The name Jessica
  • Dawn
  • Skim Milk
  • Torture
  • Excitement
  • Elbow
  • Generous
  • Gloomy
  • Lower
  • Gossip
  • Eyeball
  • Alligator
  • Assassination
  • Bandit
  • Hint
  • Glow
  • Traditional
  • Shakespeare introduced 1,700 new words to the
    English language
  • plus dozens of todays most commonly used phrases
  • 10 of the vocabulary used in Shakespearean plays
    were new words

8
The Globe Theater
  • The Globe Theater was built in 1599 by the Lord
    Chamberlins Men, Shakespeares acting company.
  • It was also known as the Wooden O due its
    shape.
  • Open air theater (no roof) and no artificial
    lighting
  • In 1613, the original Globe Theater burned down
    when a cannon shot ignited the roof during a
    performance of Henry VIII. It was rebuilt soon
    after.

9
The Globe Theater
  • The Globe was 3 stories tall and could house
    roughly 3000 people.
  • Queen Elizabeth and King James I would frequent
    the theater along with many of the rich elite in
    London.
  • On the other hand, at the base of the stage,
    there was an area called the pit, where, for a
    penny common people (the Groundlings) would
    stand to watch the performance. This ranking
    system made the theater available to everyone.
  • Flags flying above the theater indicated the type
    of play being performed. (a red flag for a
    history play, white for a comedy play and black
    for a tragedy play). This is the only
    information audiences had about the show ahead of
    time.

10
Gore at the Globe
  • Actors would fill a pigs bladder up with blood
    and hide it under their costume.
  • During a fight scene, one actor would stab
    another where the bladder was concealed so he
    would bleed on stage.
  • Audiences loved gory violence and so Shakespeare
    used a lot of it in his plays, including RJ.

11
Girls in the Globe
  • Women were not allowed to be actors during this
    time period. All characters had to be played by
    men. The character of Juliet, for example, would
    have been played by a young teenage boy who had
    yet to go through puberty.

12
Sets and Props
  • Stage sets were very minimal. Actors and
    playwrights relied on words to set the time
    period, the location or the time of day that a
    scene would be taking place.
  • Shakespeare used a narrator, called the chorus,
    to also fill in any holes that audience members
    needed about time, location, or plot.
  • Many props were used, but costumes were seen as
    the companys most valuable asset. They were
    very elaborate and expensive!

13
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14
Flag
The Heavens
Hell
"The Pit"
15
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16
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17
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18
Romeo and Juliet
  • Romeo and Juliet was written around 1595 and
    was not an entirely original story. Shakespeare
    borrowed the plot and characters from other
    sources.

19
Romeo and Juliet
  • Romeo and Juliet is set in Verona, Italy in the
    1300s or 1400s.
  • The entire action of the play takes place in 5
    days.

Juliets Window in Verona
20
Theater Vocabulary
  • Three theater terms you need to know
  • Aside A conversation two actors have on stage
    that other characters cannot hear. This also
    might be an actor talking directly to the
    audience when others around him cant hear.
  • Soliloquy a speech when an actor is alone on
    stage. Useful for telling the audience the
    thoughts or feelings of the character.
  • Monologue similar to soliloquy, but occurs when
    other actors are on stage. (Long speech)

21
The Prologue
  • Prologue Introduction
  • Recited by the chorus
  • Location, time of day, date, summary, what to
    expect, etc.
  • The prologue is a sonnet a 14 line poem
    Shakespeare was known for

22
  • Two households, both alike in dignity,In
    fair Verona, where we lay our scene,From ancient
    grudge break to new mutiny,Where civil blood
    makes civil hands unclean.From forth the fatal
    loins of these two foesA pair of star-cross'd
    lovers take their lifeWhose misadventured
    piteous overthrowsDoth with their death bury
    their parents' strife.The fearful passage of
    their death-mark'd love,And the continuance of
    their parents' rage,Which, but their children's
    end, nought could remove,Is now the two hours'
    traffic of our stageThe which if you with
    patient ears attend,What here shall miss, our
    toil shall strive to mend.

23
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24
No Fear Shakespeare Prologue
  • In the beautiful city of Verona, where our
    story takes place, a long-standing hatred between
    two families erupts into new violence, and
    citizens stain their hands with the blood of
    their fellow citizens. Two unlucky children of
    these enemy families become lovers and commit
    suicide. Their unfortunate deaths put an end to
    their parents' feud. For the next two hours, we
    will watch the story of their doomed love and
    their parents' anger, which nothing but the
    children's deaths could stop. If you listen to us
    patiently, we'll make up for everything we've
    left out in this prologue on stage.

25
What do we learn from the Prologue?
  • The play is set in Verona, Italy.
  • Two families are fighting for unknown reasons and
    the fighting has been going on for generations.
  • This feuding has caused much bloodshed already.
  • Two people, one from each family, are going to
    fall in love
  • The lovers are going to die and their deaths will
    bring the two families together
  • The story will take two hours to tell (on stage)
  • The lovers are star-crossed

26
Star Crossed Lovers
27
Why Give Away the Ending?!?!
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