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Title: Slajd%201


1
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMNTManagerial Skills

University of Warsaw, Faculty of
Management, IBP 2016
2
Tomasz Ochinowski Ph.DAssociate Professor
  • married, three children
  • head of the Department of Organizational
    Sociology and Business History, Chair of
    Managerial Psychology and Sociology, Faculty of
    Management, University of Warsaw , Poland
  • sociall skills trainer and advisor in business
  • Trainer of the year 2006 by Institute for
    International Research. Poland.

3
My main trainers in managerial skills
4
Our rules
  • Course Grading
  • Readings
  • Magala, S. (2005). Cross- Cultural Competence.
    London Routledge, chapter 1 and 3.
  • Magala, S. (2007). The Management of Meaning in
    Organizations. London, NY Palgrave Macmillan,
    part 1 and 4
  • Zeidner, R. (2015). Rebuilding HR. HR Magazine,
    May 2015, pp. 26- 34.
  • Hollenbeck, J. R. and Jamieson, B. B. (2015).
    Human capital, social capital, and social network
    analysis implications for strategic human
    resource management, Academy of Management
    Perspectives, Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 370385 .
  • Shyh-Jer Chen, John J. Lawler, and Johngseok Bae
    (2005), Convergence in human resource systems a
    comparison of locally owned and MNC subsidiaries
    in Taiwan, Human Resource Management, Vol. 44,
    No 3, pp. 237-256.
  • 1. Ongoing analysis of selected foreign companies
  • operating in Poland in terms of HRM will count
    for 40
  • Cross- cultural groups of 5 persons
  • 3. Questions about Readings (the same groups
    presentations, 10 minutes) will count for 20
  • 2. Oral exam after course completing
  • (course content and readings) will count for 40

5
(No Transcript)
6
To sum up from the beginningby Daniel J.
Boorstin, The Americans. The Democratic
Experienceand http//www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/peo
ple/d_h/goodnight.htm
  • There's gold from the grass roots down, but
    there's more gold from the grass roots up
  • California Joe, a guide in the gold-rich Dakotas
    in the 1870's.

7
Legend has it that
  • sometime toward the end of the Civil War a
    heavy-laden government ox train traveling through
    the northern plains of eastern Wyoming was caught
    a snowstorm and had to be abandoned. The driver
    returned the next spring to see what had become
    of his cargo. Instead of the skeletons he had
    expected to find, he saw his oxen living, fat and
    healthy.

8
Charles Goodnightthe Secret of Success
  • 1866 (68) - he and Oliver Loving made a new
    trail from Belknap, Texas, to Fort Sumner, New
    Mexico, which became known as the
    Goodnight-Loving Trail.
  • They delivered 2000 head of cattle
  • They had made more than 12,000
  • Goodnight multiplied the quote later

1836-1929
9
Charles Goodnight(some details)
  • He had lived in Texas since 1845
  • 1866 (68) - he agreed with his partner to deliver
    40 000 worth of Texas Longhorns big herd
    (2000 head of cattle) across 800 miles, from
    Texas to Wyoming
  • oxenn bought for 3 or 4 a head in Texas, sold
    for 35 or 40 up North
  • Goodnight was trailing cattle north by the
    thousands and achieved fame and fortune.

10
After about 10 -20 yearsbarbed wire
RANCHES
  • In 1877 he with John Adair build JA Ranch (soon
    counted one hundred thousand cattle and million
    acres)
  • He founded the first cattlemens association to
    fight cattle thieves in the region developed new
    equipment for the drive ant the ranch improved
    cattle breeds by crossing
  • After the death of his first wife, to whom he had
    been married for 55 years, he remarried at the
    age of 91 and had his first child !

11
Secrets of Goodnights Success ?

12

(...) The cattle, of course, moved on their own
legs, but the vehicle that carried them was the
organized drive
13
clear rules
  • Before starting on a trial drive Goodnight made
    it a rule to draw up an article of agreement,
    setting forth what each man was to do. The main
    clause stipulated that if one shot another he was
    to be tried by the outfit and hanged on the spot,
    if found guilty. boundary
  • The successful drive had to be sober and
    orderly so liquor, gambling, and even swearing
    were prohibited on the trial zero tolerance

14
virtual communication
  • Communication on the trial () was by hand
    signals, mostly borrowed from the Plains Indians

15
structure and dynamic
  • The cowboy crew gave shape to the mile-long
    herd, kept the cattle from bunching up into a
    dense, unwieldy mass or from stringing out to a
    thin, discontinuous thread. At the front were two
    of the most experienced men (called pointers),
    who navigated the herd, following the course set
    by the foreman. Bringing up the rear were three
    study cowboys whose job it was to look out for
    the weaker cattle() keep out the corners. The
    rest of the crew were stationed along the
    sides() flat structure
  • The men were rotated from front to rear and back
    toward the front (the nearer the point, the
    lighter the work) to divide the burden on the men
    and the horses rotation

16
risk strategy
  • procedures for stampede

17
logistic
  • To feed the men there had to be a chuck wagon,
    carrying food and utensils, which the cook would
    drive fast ahead to the next camping place so
    that food could be ready when the herd arrived
    catering
  • The horses (called the remuda) which were
    brought along as spares to provide remounts were
    in care of a wrangler who kept them moving along
    together, just in front of the herd weak points
    support by outsourcing

18
organizational culture
  • At night, guards making their rounds would sing
    and whistle (the veteran cowman Andy Adams
    explained) so that the sleeping herd may know
    that a friend and not an enemy is keeping vigil
    over their dreams. As well-serenaded herd would
    be less apt to stampede. Cowboy hymns they were
    called, because their tunes were compounded from
    childhood memories of church services. But their
    words told the exploits of famous horse races,
    addressed the cattle with endearment or
    blaspheming, repeated advertising slogans from
    coffee cans, or simply sprinkled profanity
    between nonsense syllables

19
special responsibility of top managers
  • (...)The foremen and owner () were responsible
    for the lives of their men, not only against
    Indians so far as possible, but against each
    other in all cases.

20
Current HRM questions
21
Fundamentals of HRM by D.A. Decenzo with the
interpretation of Maciej Brzozowski
  • Management the process off efficiently getting
    activities completed with and through other
    people.
  • Functions of management
  • Planning
  • Organizing
  • Leading
  • Controlling

22
Fundamentals of HRM
  • Main functions of HRM
  • staffing (getting people strategic HR
    planning, recruiting, selection)
  • training and development (preparing people
    employee training and development, career
    development, organization development)
  • motivation (stimulating people motivation
    theories and job design, performance appraisals,
    rewards and compensation, employee benefits )
  • maintenance functions (keeping people safety
    and health, communications, employee relations)

23
Human Resources Management Fundamentals of HRM
Why the HRM is important?
1. No company can exist without human
resources. 2. People really create companies. 3.
Management means to solve problem of
resources. Conclusion human resources management
is necessary in business.
Especially HRM is responsible for - getting
competent people, - training them, - getting to
perform higher results, - maintaining
affiliation of people with the organization.
24
Fundamentals of HRM
  • HRM in relation to the size of the company
  • Big company divisions
  • Employment
  • Training and development
  • Compensation and benefits
  • Employee relations
  • Shared services sharing of HRM activities among
    geographically dispersed divisions.
  • HR Shared services centralized HRM activities
    focusing on such activities as organization
    development, and compensation and benefits.

25
Fundamentals of HRM
  • Environmental influences affecting HRM
  • dynamic changes in environment
  • government legislation
  • labour unions
  • ideas of management (Taylor, Elton Mayo
    Hawthorne experiments)

26

HRM in a Dynamic Environment still by D.A.
Decenzo with the interpretation of Monika
Kordowska

27
GLOBAL VILLAGE ENVIRONMENT
HRM must be prepared to deal with constantly
changing world, which means understanding
implications of - globalization - technology
changes - work force diversity - changing
skills requirement - continuous improvement
initiatives - contingent work force -
decentralized work sites - employee involvement
28
GLOBAL VILLAGE MOBILITY!
Multicultural / multinational / multilingual
environment
RACE
POLITICS
RELIGION
LAW
CUSTOMS HABITS
Flexibility Availability highly important for
managers working in multicultural environment
HRM must develop mechanisms that will help
multicultural individuals work together build
teams
29
WORK FORCE DIVERSITY
Nowadays
  • challenge for employees is to make their
    organizations more accommodating to diverse
    groups of people by addressing different life
    styles, family needs and work styles.
  • employers try to recognize and celebrate of
    differences - these are finding their
    organizations more profitable and effective

30
CHANGING SKILLS REQUIREMENTS
  • full time employment
  • provide essential job tasks
  • take advantage of full social benefits

CORE WORKERS
  • hired for shorter period of time
  • sell their services to the organization
  • perform specific tasks, sometimes require
    special job skills

CONTINGENCY WORKERS
31
DECENTRALIZED WORK SITES
Creates new issue for HRM
TELECOMMUTING working at home on a computer
which is linked to the office Telecommuting
capabilities that exist today have made it
possible for employees to be located anywhere on
the globe - ensuring work quality and
on-time completion - monitoring work results -
motivating training employees
challenges
32

GLOBAL VILLAGE ENVIRONMENT
The crucial question is HOW THESE CHANGES
ARE AFFECTING MANAGERIAL GOALS AND PRACTICES ?
33
Just Flow
34
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyiflowhighly enjoyable
moments, when we concentrate on a task, using all
our skills, knowing what has to be done. In flow
we fell totally involved, lost in a seemingly
effortless performance.
  • Do you ever do something where your skills have
    become so second nature that sometimes
    everything seems to come to you naturally or
    effortlessly, and where you feel confident that
    you will be ready to met any new challenges?
  • Do you ever do something where your concentration
    is so intense, your attention so undivided and
    wrapped up in what you are doing that you
    sometimes become unaware of things you normally
    notice
  • ( for instance, other people talking, loud noise,
    the passage of time, being hungry or tired,
    having an appointment, having some physical
    discomfort)?

35
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyiflow
  • Do you do something where you feel that the
    activity is worth doing in itself? In other
    words, even if there were no other benefits
    associated with it (for instance, financial
    reward, improved skills, recognition from others,
    and so on) you would still do it?
  • Do you ever do something that has provide some
    unique and very memorable moments - for which you
    feel extremely lucky and grateful - that has
    changed your perspective on life (or yourself) in
    some way?

36
Building Flow in Organizations
37
Conditions that make work more flow like
opportunity to concentrate, and the loss of ego.
  • Too many of the young people that we get out of
    business school, their major aim is to say I want
    to make a million dollars before Im thirty. They
    dont say I wont to do a good job or help to
    build a company. There is nothing much selfless
    in them, and they are doomed to failure if there
    isnt a selfless quality in their own values.
  • (J. Irwin Miller)

38
The alternative narration
  • Positive Psychology
  • - do you know such animal?

39
Martin Seligmans daughters statementThe case
is based on Positive Psychology An Introduction
by Martin E.P. Seligman and Mihaly
Csikszentmihalyi(2000) http//www.postivepsycholo
gy.org/apintro.htm
  • The personal story explains how professionals
    arrived at the conviction that a movement toward
    positive psychology was needed and how this
    special issue came about. For Martin E. P.
    Seligman, it began at a moment in time a few
    months after he had been elected President of the
    American Psychological Association.

40
The moment took place in my garden...
  • ....while I was weeding with my five-year old
    daughter, Nikki. I have to confess that even
    though I write books about children, I'm really
    not all that good with children. I am
    goal-oriented and time-urgent and when I'm
    weeding in the garden, I'm actually trying to get
    the weeding done. Nikki, however, was throwing
    weeds into the air, singing, and dancing around.
    I yelled at her. She walked away came back and...

41
...and said...
  • Daddy, I want to talk to you.
  • Yes, Nikki?
  • Daddy, do you remember before my fifth birthday?
    From the time I was three to the time I was five,
    I was a whiner. I whined every day. When I turned
    five, I decided not to whine anymore. That was
    the hardest thing I've ever done. And if I can
    stop whining, you can stop being such a grouch.

42
This was for me an epiphany, nothing less.
  • I learned something about Nikki, about raising
    kids, about myself, and a great deal about my
    profession.
  • What did Seligman discover?

43
Seligmans epiphany
1. First, I realized that raising Nikki was not
about correcting whining. Nikki did that herself.
Rather, I realized that raising Nikki is about
taking this marvelous strength -- I call it
"seeing into the soul," -- amplifying it,
nurturing it, helping her to lead her life around
it to buffer against her weaknesses and the
storms of life. Raising children, I realized, is
vastly more than fixing what is wrong with them.
It is about identifying and nurturing their
strongest qualities, what they own and are best
at, and helping them find niches in which they
can best live out these strengths.
44
Seligmans epiphany
  • 2. As for my own life, Nikki hit the nail right
    on the head. I was a grouch. I had spent fifty
    years mostly enduring wet weather in my soul, and
    the last ten years being a nimbus cloud in a
    household full of sunshine. Any good fortune I
    had was probably not due to my grumpiness, but in
    spite of it. In that moment, I resolved to
    change.

45
Seligmans epiphany
3. But the broadest implication of Nikki's
teaching was about the science and profession of
psychology Before World War 2, psychology had
three distinct missions curing mental illness,
making the lives of all people more productive
and fulfilling, and identifying and nurturing
high talent.(...)
46
Seligmans epiphany
  • Right after the war, two events -- both economic
    -- changed the face of psychology in 1946 the
    Veteran's Administration was founded, and
    thousands of psychologists found out that they
    could make a living treating mental illness. In
    1947, the National Institute of Mental Health
    (which, in spite of its charter, has always been
    based on the disease model, and should now more
    appropriately be renamed the National Institute
    of Mental Illness) was founded, and academics
    found out that they could get grants if their
    research was about pathology.

47
negative bias in social sciences
This arrangement brought many benefits. There
have been huge strides in the understanding and
therapy for mental illness at least fourteen
disorders, previously intractable, have yielded
their secrets to science and can now be either
cured or considerably relieved (...). But the
downside was that the other two fundamental
missions of psychology -- making the lives of all
people better and nurturing genius -- were all
but forgotten. Practitioners went about
treating the mental illness of patients within a
disease framework by repairing damage damaged
habits, damaged drives, damaged childhoods, and
damaged brains.
48
positive psychology
The new century challenges psychology to shift
more of its intellectual energy to the study of
the positive aspects of human experience. A
SCIENCE OF POSITIVE SUBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE, OF
POSITIVE INDIVIDUAL TRAITS, AND OF POSITIVE
INSTITUTIONS PROMISES TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF
LIFE AND ALSO TO PREVENT THE VARIOUS PATHOLOGIES
THAT ARISE WHEN LIFE IS BARREN AND MEANINGLESS.
49
Renewing Virtue
  • 1. Seligman's team read Aristotle and Plato,
    Aquinas and Augustine, the Old Testament and the
    Talmud, Cofucius, Buddha, Lao-Tze, Bushido (the
    samurai code), the Koran, Benajmin Franklin and
    the Upanishads.
  • 2. They recognized To our surprise, almost
    every single one of these traditions flung across
    three thousand years and the entire face of the
    earth

50
endorsed six virtues
  • Wisdom and knowledge
  • Courage
  • Love and humanity
  • Justice
  • Temperance
  • Spirituality and transcendence

51
What are your highest personal strengths? (by
M.E.P. Seligman)
52
Twenty- four personal strengths
  • Wisdom and knowledge
  • Curiosity
  • Love of learning
  • Judgment
  • Ingenuity
  • Social intelligence
  • Perspective

53
Twenty- four personal strengths
  • Courage
  • Valor
  • Perseverance
  • Integrity

54
Twenty- four personal strengths
  • Love and humanity
  • Kindness
  • Loving

55
Twenty- four personal strengths
  • Justice
  • Citizenship
  • Fairness
  • Leadership

56
Twenty- four personal strengths
  • Temperance
  • Self- control
  • Prudence
  • Humility

57
Twenty- four personal strengths
  • Spirituality and transcendence
  • Appreciation of beauty
  • Gratitude
  • Hope
  • Spirituality
  • Forgiveness
  • Humor
  • Zest

58
Would you like to get to know you personal
strengths???
The test below is twenty- five minute exercise
rank orders your strengths from top to bottom
59
CURIOSITY/ INTEREST IN THE WORLD
  • The statement I am always curious about the
    world is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • I am easily bored is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

60
LOVE OF LEARNING
  • 1. The statement I am thrilled when I learn
    something new is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I never go out of my way to visit museums or
    other educational sites is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

61
JUDGEMENT/ CRITICAL THINKING/ OPEN- MINDEDNESS
  • 1. The statement When the topic calls for it, I
    can be a highly rational thinker is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I tend to make snap judgments is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

62
INGENUITY/ ORGINALITY/ PRATCICAL INTELLIGENCE/
STREET SMARTS
  • 1. The statement I like to think of new ways to
    do things is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. Most of my friends are more imaginative than
    I am is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

63
PERESPECTIVE
  • 1. The statement I am always able to look at
    things and see the big picture is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. Others rarely come to me for advice is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

64
VALOR AND BRAVERY
  • 1. The statement I have taken frequent stands in
    the face of strong oppositions is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. Pain and disappointment often get the better
    of me is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

65
PERSEVERENCE/ INDUSTRY/ DILIGENCE
  • 1. The statement I always finish what I start
    is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I get sidetracked when I work is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

66
INTEGRITY/ GENINENESS/ HONESTY
  • 1. The statement I always keep my promises is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. My friends never tell me I am down to earth
    is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

67
KINDNESS AND GENROSITY
  • 1. The statement I have voluntarily helped a
    neighbor in the last month is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I am rarely as excited about the good
    fortune of others as I m about my own is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

68
LOVING AND ALLOWING ONESELF TO BE LOVED
  • 1. The statement There re people in my life who
    care as much about my feelings and well- being as
    they do about their own is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I have trouble accepting love from others
    is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

69
CITIZENSHIP/ DUTY/ TEAMWORK/ LOYALTY
  • 1. The statement I work at my best when I am in
    a group is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I hesitate to sacrifice my self- interest
    for the benefit of groups I am in is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

70
FAIRNESS AND EQUITY
  • 1. The statement I treat all people equally
    regardless of who they might be is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. If I do not like someone, it is difficult
    for me to treat him or her fairly is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

71
LEADERSHIP
  • 1. The statement I can always get people to do
    things together without nagging them is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I am not very good at planning group
    activities is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

72
SELF- CONTROL
  • 1. The statement I control my emotions is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I can rarely stay on a diet is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

73
PRUDENCE/ DISCRETION/ CAUTION
  • 1. The statement I avoid activities that are
    physically dangerous is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I sometimes make poor choice in friendships
    and relationships is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

74
HUMILITY AND MODESTY
  • 1. The statement I change the subject when
    people pay me compliments is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I often talk about my accomplishments is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

75
APRECIATION OF BEAUTY AND EXCELLENCE
  • 1. The statement In the last month, I have been
    thrilled by excellence in music, art., drama,
    film, sport, science, mathematic is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I have not created anything of beauty in the
    last year is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

76
GRATITUDE
  • 1. The statement I always say thank you, even
    for little thing is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I rarely stop and count my blessings is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

77
HOPE/ OPTIMISM/ FUTURE- MINDEDNESS
  • 1. The statement I always look on the bright
    side is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I rarely have a well- thought- out plan for
    what I want to do is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

78
SPIRITUALITY/ SENSE OF PURPOSE/
FAITH/RELIGIOUSNESS
  • 1. The statement My life has a strong purpose
    is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I do not have a calling in life is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

79
FORGIVENESS AND MERCY
  • 1. The statement I always let bygones be
    bygones is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I always try to get even is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

80
PLAYFULNESS AND HUMOR
  • 1. The statement I always mix work and play as
    much as possible is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I rarely say funny things is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

81
ZEST/ PASSION/ ENTHUSIASM
  • 1. The statement I throw myself into everything
    what I do is
  • Very much like me 5
  • Like me 4
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 2
  • very much unlike me 1
  • 2. I mope a lot is
  • Very much like me 1
  • Like me 2
  • Neutral 3
  • Unlike me 4
  • very much unlike me 5

82
Conclusion
  • The details differ, of course() but the
    commonality is real and, to those of us raised as
    ethical relativists, pretty remarkable. This
    unpacks to meaning of the claim that human beings
    are moral animals.

83
The strengths of character
  • - the routes, by which we achieve the virtues-

84
To qualify as signature strength, a strength must
meet the following criteria(after _at_Mary Ann
Copson)
  • A sense of ownership and authenticity ("This is
    the real me")
  • A feeling of excitement while displaying it,
    particularly at first
  • A rapid learning curve as the strength is first
    practiced
  • Continuous learning of new ways to enact the
    strength
  • A sense of yearning to find new ways to use it
  • A feeling of inevitability in using the strength
    ("Try and stop me")
  • Invigoration rather than exhaustion while using
    the strengths
  • The creation and pursuit of personal projects
    that revolve around it
  • Joy, zest, enthusiasm, even ecstasy while using
    it (Seligman, 2002a, p.160)

85
Seligman recipe for more flow at work
  • Identify your signature strengths
  • Choose work that lets you see them every day
  • Recraft your present work to use your signature
    strengths more

86
Strengths- based HRM policy
  • If you are employer, choose employees whose
    signature strengths mesh with the work they will
    do.
  • If you are a manager, make room to allow
    employees to recraft work within bounds of your
    goals

87
and, so
  • Have flow as often as possible

88
Indicate how much you are like A, B or C.
  • WORK AND PERSONAL SATISFECTION

89
A Job
  • Ms. A works primarily to earn enough money to
    support her life outside of her job. If she was
    financially secure, she would no longer continue
    with her current line of work, but would really
    rather do something else instead. Ms. As job is
    basically a necessity of life, a lot like
    breathing or sleeping. She often wishes the time
    would pass more quickly at work. She greatly
    anticipates weekends and vacations. If Ms. A
    lived her life over again, she probably would not
    go into the same line of work. She would not
    encourage her friends and children to enter her
    line of work. Ms. A is very eager to retire.

90
A Career
  • Ms. B basically enjoys her work, but does not
    expect to be in her current job five years from
    now. Instead, she plans to move on to a better,
    higher-level job. She has several goals for her
    future pertaining to the positions she would
    eventually like to hold. Sometimes her work seems
    like a waste of time, but she knows she must do
    sufficiently well in her current position in
    order to move on. Ms. B can't wait to get a
    promotion. For her, a promotion means recognition
    of her good work, and is a sign of her success in
    competition with her coworkers.

91
A Calling
  • Ms. C's work is one of the most important parts
    of her life. She is very pleased that she is in
    this line of work. Because what she does for a
    living is a vital part of who she is, it is one
    of the first things she tells people about
    herself. She tends to take her work home with
    her, and on vacations, too. The majority of her
    friends are from her place of employment, and she
    belongs to several organizations and clubs
    pertaining to her work. Ms. C feels good about
    her work because she loves it, and because she
    thinks it makes the world a better place. She
    would encourage her friends and children to enter
    her line of work. Ms. C would be pretty upset if
    she were forced to stop working, and she is not
    particularly looking forward to retirement.

92
SO
  • What do you thing about your job
  • Job is a job
  • Job means career
  • Job is my calling

93
Look whos talking
I was, and I am, a strong believer that one of
the most satisfying things in life is to create a
highly moral and ethical environment in which
every individuals is allowed and encouraged to
realize that God-given potential
94
Ethic slogans as disguise
Bookstores are full of volumes containing very
good advice about how to be effective manager or
successful leader. Often such books will instruct
a reader to model his or her behavior on the
cynical wisdom of Machiavelli, (...) or the
ruthlessness of Attila the Hun as a way to
achieve power and plunder.
95
Good Work and Good Business
How workers and leaders who have impressed their
peers for both their business success and their
commitment to boarder social goals go about their
jobs ? What ambitions motivate them ? What
kind of organizations they try to develop in
pursuit of those ideas ?
96
Good Good Work Business
Howard Gardner Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi William
Damon good workers people, who (1) are skilled
in one or more professional realms and (2) are
thoughtful about their responsibilities and the
implications of their work.
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi leaders who do
good business try to create ethical environments
in which individuals could realize their
potentials.
97
Good workers
  • are concerned to act in a responsible fashion
    with respect toward their
  • personal goals
  • their family, friends, peers and colleagues
  • their mission or sense of calling
  • the institutions with which they are affiliated
  • the wider world (people they do not know, those
    who will come afterwards, and in the grandest
    sense, to the planet or to God)

98
Ray Suarez
  • a broadcast journalist
  • Having discovered a love of writing during high
    school, he had works as a radio and television
    reporter both in the United States and abroad.
  • Beginning in the mid-1980s he had a seven year
    stint in commercial news with Channel 5, an NBC
    affiliate in Chicago

99
In 1993 he encountered the dilemma that made him
consider quitting the profession entirely
When video games started to become hot, a
family sued the major makers of video games in
the United States for some unbelievable amount of
money.because their kids would get seizures. And
about half-way into reporting the story I
realized that we were talking about one-tenth of
one- hundredth of one-thousandth of the kids who
plays video games. But TV has a tendency to play
everything like, Heres a possible danger of
video games
100
He sadly summed up the battle with the executive
of the station
  • And that fight went on for a long time, in TV
    terms, like an hour or an hour and half. I lost
  • His heart told him to get out of this line of
    work, while his bank balance told him to swallow
    his pride and his assigned job. His head, where
    he had to sort out the alternatives and make a
    decision, was swirling.

101
after
Suarez was a senior correspondent for the Public
Broadcasting Services News Hour. He has been an
innovator, much honored within the profession and
widely respected among the listening public.
102
Good work in difficult times(ethical dilemmas)
  • Mission of the profession
  • Why should society reward the kind of work that I
    do with status and certain privileges?
  • Standards (best practices)
  • Which workers in the profession best realize the
    calling and why?
  • Identity central element - what lines I will
    not cross and why ?

103
the mirror test
The image comes from a German ambassador in
London who, as a part of a celebration he had to
host in honor of Britains King Edward VII, was
asked to provide a bevy of prostitutes. The
diplomat felt that he could not to this and
instead resigned his position.
104
Asked why, he responded
I refused to see a pimp in the mirror in the
morning when I shave (after P. F.Drucker,
Management Challenges for the Twenty-first
Century)
105
What would it be like to live in a world
If everyone were to behave in the way I
have?
106
The principles of Good Business
  • a powerful vision beyond the self
  • -to do ones best
  • -to help people
  • -to build a better world

107
The principles of Good Business
  • Special principles of organizational behavior
  • -the importance of trust, which is brought about
    by respect
  • -an organization is concerned with the personal
    growth of its members
  • -providing opportunities for flow in the workplace

108
The principles of Good Business
  • a product that helps humankind

109
Lets have some entertainmentsScent of a woman
by Martin Brest
110
  • Rhetoric
  • as a basic HRM
  • skill

111
What is rhetoric?(Deirdre McCloskey)
  • By "rhetoric" is not meant a verbal shell game,
    as in "empty rhetoric" or "mere rhetoric"
  • (although form is not trivial, either disdain
    for the form of words is evidence of a mind
    closed to the varieties of argument).

112
persuasive orientationsLogos
  • Logos originally occurs in philosophy,
    metaphysics, rhetoric, and even religion,
    referring to the logical, rational, evidential
    underpinning of a speakers argument. () it is
    the logical and reasonable substance that should
    be the major part of a communicators
    presentation. Logos involves determining the
    status of a case ascertaining the facts testing
    the evidence as well as constructing arguments.
    Logos exercises a tremendous influence on western
    thinking including todays business
    communication.
  • Zhu Yunxia and Herbert W. Hildebrandt (2002).
    Greek and Chinese Classical Rhetoric The Root of
    Cultural Differences in Business and Marketing
    Communication. Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing
    and Logistics, vol. 14 92.

113
persuasive orientationsEthos
  • Fundamentally ethos can mean the believability
    of the speaker, the credibility which the speaker
    brings to the speech situation. The speaker has
    to create his own credibility he has to maintain
    a moral linkage between himself and his content,
    and should be considered a man of good
    character.
  • Zhu Yunxia and Herbert W. Hildebrandt (2002).
    Greek and Chinese Classical Rhetoric The Root of
    Cultural Differences in Business and Marketing
    Communication. Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing
    and Logistics, vol. 14 92.

114
persuasive orientationsPathos
  • Pathos as an artistic proof focuses on using
    the emotions as a supplement to a speakers other
    means of persuasion. This process was simply
    searching out content exterior to the speaker and
    arouse emotional feelings in the message
    receiver.
  • Zhu Yunxia and Herbert W. Hildebrandt (2002).
    Greek and Chinese Classical Rhetoric The Root of
    Cultural Differences in Business and Marketing
    Communication. Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing
    and Logistics, vol. 14 93.

115
Leadership communications(J. Baldoni)
  • Leadership communications consists of those
    messages from a leader that are rooted in the
    values and culture of an organization and are of
    significant importance to key stakeholders, e.g.,
    employees, customers, strategic partners,
    shareholders, and the media. These messages
    affect the vision, mission, and transformation of
    an organization. The chief intention of a
    leadership message is to build trust between the
    leader and her or his constituency

116
  • In its simplest form, leadership communication is
    communication that
  • flows from the leadership perspective. It is
    grounded in the character of the leader as well
    as the values of the organization. It is an
    expression of culture as well as an indicator of
    the climate, e.g., openness, integrity, and
    honesty.

117
Traits of leadership communications reflect
  • Significance. Messages are about big
    issues that reflect the present and future of the
    organization (e.g., people, performance,
    products, and services).
  • Values. Messages reflect vision, mission, and
    culture.
  • Consistency. Messages exemplify stated values
    and behaviors.
  • Cadence. Messages occur with regularity and
    frequency.

118
PURPOSE OF LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATIOS
  • 1. Affirm organizational vision and mission.
  • Drive transformational initiatives,
  • e.g., changes!
  • 3. Issue a call to action.
  • 4. Reinforce organizational capability
  • 5. Create an environment in which motivation can
    occur
  • 6. Promote a product or service (and affirm its
    link to the organizations vision, mission, and
    values).

119
The basic ( and no so easy) steps of effective
listening in businessby Michael S. Hanna and
Gerald L. Wilson ( with modifications)
  • 1. Work hard at listening. Avoiding distractions
    is hard work. Do not think about your answer.
    Concentrate on what is being said.
  • 2. Paraphrase the content and the feeling
  • reflect in your own words what the speaker
    seems to mean by his words and behavior,
  • ask him whether you are right,
  • calibrate his reaction.

120
Pharaprase active listening
  • Paraphrasing is not parroting but putting what
    you have heard into your own words. When you do
    this, the speaker hears your interpretation of
    what was said and can correct your understanding
    if it seems faulty. Thus by paraphrasing youll
    know if you understand. You can continue if you
    do you can be corrected if you dont.
  • M. S. Hanna and G. L. Wilson

121
Does the paraphrasing seem artificial ?
  • Sometimes.....
  • Yes....
  • How to avoid it ?
  • Practice, practice and practice. Professionals
    think that the artificial sound of the talk will
    disappear if you practice its use.
  • Do not use the same words every time. Not only
    What I hear you saying is..., but also - for
    example - I want to feed back what youve
    said....
  • Remember Paraphrasing everything the other
    person says would drive anybody mad.

122
Benefits to paraphrasing When ? Why?
  • the information being given is particularly
    important to you or the organization
  • is complex or involves several steps
  • involves a problem and the persons come to you
    for help
  • involves deep emotions
  • The speaker feels good about himself when he
    finds that someone is interested in what he has
    to say.
  • The speaker believes that the other person cares
    about him because he or she has taken the time to
    listen.
  • The speaker feels more confident that the
    listener will be able to do the task and has
    more cofindence in that persons willingness to
    do the task.
  • The speaker assumes that the listener is a
    person of good will and understands the task.

123
The main benefit
  • ALL THESE THIGS STRENGTHEN SPEAKER - LISTENER
    RELATIONSIPS

124
The basic ( and no so easy) steps of effective
listening in businessby Michael S. Hanna and
Gerald L. Wilson
  • Check out your inferences. Checking will allow
    confirmation and denial.
  • Empathize. Emphaty helps you understand the
    speakers view.
  • Work on remembering. Note taking, association,
    review help memory. Practice and understanding
    will bring improvement.

125
Some practical suggestions for the effective
nonverbal communicationby Leslie W. Rue and
Lloyd L. Byars
  • Know the most frequent methods of nonverbal
    communication that you use. Repetitive of
    nonverbal communication can be very distracting.
    The best method of learning this is through
    feedback from friends and peers.
  • Remember that your personal appearance
    communicates messages to employees.
  • Do not artificially use nonverbal communication.
    Hand movements that do not coincide with your
    expression are distracting.

126
A small case
  • All the participants are asked to divide
    themselves
  • into three groups. You have five minutes to
  • prepare a small presentation about negotiators
  • features.
  • The first group point some characteristics of
    unskilled negotiator
  • The second group point some characteristics of
    skilled negotiator
  • The third group point some characteristics of
    overused skill negotiator

127
WHY LAWYERS ARE UNHAPPY?Martin E. P. Seligman
  • (a) pessimism
  • (b) low decision latitude,
  • (c) the zero-sum game nature of the job.

128
Have you ever heard someone say....?
  • No matter how hard I study Ill never pass this
    course
  • Ill never learn to do this, regardless of how
    much I practice
  • You cant fight city hall

129
Martin E. P. Seligmans workfrom Learned
Helplessness to Learned Optimism
  • Learned Helplessness
  • the belief
  • -that ones actions are ineffective and have
    little to do with the outcome
  • -that ones actions bear no relation to rewards
    and punishments received
  • -that one has no control of the environment.

130
Learned Helplessness
  • Results
  • social passivity
  • depression (often ends in suicide )
  • - the plague of our times?
  • 1994-1989
  • Central and East Europe
  • - learned helplessness massive training in
    politics and economy?
  • Reasons
  • life experiences, especially childhood
  • but
  • being made helpless by some experience was not
    enough
  • the way people explain life event ( explanatory
    style) is very important to the development of
    learned helplessness

131
Explanatory style
  • Person's explanatory style of the causes of good
    and bad life events3 dimensions
  • The Internal versus The ExternalThe Stable
    versus The UnstableThe Global versus The
    Specific

132
Optimists (immunity from learned helplessness)
  • they perceive the causes of good events as
    internal (to be related to something about their
    own personal characteristics) rather than
    external (outside, environmental forces) stable
    (enduring) rather than unstable (just temporary)
    and global
  • (universal, cutting among many situations) rather
    than specific (in just one sphere of life)
  • they perceive the causes of bad events as
    external (outside, environmental forces) rather
    than internal (to be related to something about
    their own personal characteristics) unstable
    (just temporary)rather than stable (enduring)
    and specific (in just one sphere of life) rather
    than global (universal, cutting among many
    situations).

133
Pessimists(their explanatory style makes them
vulnerable, so that experiences led to depression)
  • they perceive the causes of good events as
    external (outside, environmental forces) rather
    than internal (to be related to something about
    their own personal characteristics) unstable
    (just temporary) rather than stable (enduring)
    and specific (in just one sphere of life) rather
    than global (universal, cutting among many
    situations).
  • they perceive the causes of bad events as
    internal (to be related to something about their
    own personal characteristics) rather than
    external (outside, environmental forces) stable
    (enduring) rather than unstable (just temporary)
    and global
  • (universal, cutting among many situations) rather
    than specific (in just one sphere of life).

134
Pessimistic Rumination
  • focus on a bad event the who, what, where, and
    how of a bad event
  • explanation for a bad event
  • negative emotions or negative emotional state

135
Mike how to deal with him?
  • He was a natural leader, creative, energetic and
    ambitious. "Mike had
  • appeared to be the ideal recruit for a
    fast-growing electronics
  • company. It was only after he got the job that
    certain less favourable
  • aspects of his behaviour came to light. He
    couldn't get along with his
  • secretary, he "forgot" to take on less
    interesting projects, he
  • bullied colleagues and walked out of meetings.
    But since he'd already
  • complained about his boss to senior management,
    his boss's concerns
  • were never taken seriously, and the company even
    singled Mike out as a
  • "high-potential employee .

136
Perhaps you know someone like Mike..
  • Someone charming, yet aggressive
  • a manipulative boss who can't be bothered with
    paperwork one who
  • constantly switches allegiance as different
    people become useful. Mike
  • embellished the truth on his application form,
    failed to document his
  • expense claims and turned out, in the end, to be
    setting up his own
  • business on company time and resources. He is
    what some psychologists
  • describe as (Laura Spinney, Snakes in Suits,
    2004)

137
Paul Babiak and Robert Hare
  • an industrial or corporate psychopath

138
Hervey Cleckley clinical symptoms
  • superficial charm and good intelligence
  • absence of delusions and other signs of
  • irrational thinking
  • absence of 'nervousness' or other psychoneurotic
  • manifestations unreliability, untruthfulness,
    and insincerity
  • lack of remorse or shame
  • inadequately motivated antisocial behaviour
  • poor judgement and failure to learn by experience

139
Hervey Cleckley clinical symptoms
  • pathologic egocentricity and incapacity for love
  • general poverty in major affective reactions
  • specific loss of insight
  • unresponsiveness in general interpersonal
    relations
  • fantastic and uninviting behaviour with drink and
    sometimes without
  • suicide rarely carried out
  • sex life impersonal, trivial and poorly
    integrated
  • and failure to follow any life plan.

140
Coming up
  • Corporate cult

141
Please answer each of the twenty questions on a
scale from strongly agree (1) to strongly
disagree (5)
  • 1. I feel a strong sense of loyalty toward this
    company.
  • 2. Even if the firm were not doing well
    financially, I would be reluctant to change to
    another employer.
  • 3. The offer of a bit more money with another
    employer would not seriously make me think of
    changing my job.
  • 4. Based on what I know and what I believe I can
    expect, I would be quite willing to spend rest of
    my career with this company.
  • 5. I believe in the work my organization does.
  • 6. I feel that I am working for a cause that is
    greater than just earning a living.
  • 7. My work serves a good cause.
  • 8. The work of my organization benefits society.

142
Please answer each of the questions on a scale
from strongly agree (1)to strongly disagree (5)
  • 9. I have faith in the leader even when things go
    wrong.
  • 10. I admire the leader.
  • 11. It would be hard to find someone who colud
    lead this organizations better than the leader.
  • 12. I trust the leaders decision.

143
Please answer each of the twenty questions on a
scale from strongly agree (1)to strongly
disagree (5)
  • 13. The major satisfaction in my life come from
    my work.
  • 14. The most important thing that happen to me
    involve my work.
  • 15. My life goals are mainly work-oriented.
  • 16. My work is a large part of who I am.
  • 17. Many of my close personal friends work at
    this company.
  • 18. The organization where I work is always
    planning social events for its employees.
  • 19. I look forward to being with members of my
    immediate work group each day.
  • 20. The people in my immediate work group take a
    personal interest in what I do.

144
Corporate CultsThe Insidious Lure of the
All-Consuming Organization
  • New York 2000.
  • AMACOM American Management Association
  • Dave Arnott
  • professor of strategic management, Dallas Baptist
    University, USA

145
Arnott finds signs of cults in some business
organizations among them companies of
international prestige
  • By catering to almost all aspects of employees
    lives, they have become to them just like homes
  • According to Arnott, the organizations of this
    kind, bases on non-ethical exchange corporate
    cults are gaining an economic good (skill and
    time) and exchanging a noneconomic good
    (affiliation with the corporation).

146
Primary traits that define a cult (after Ph.
Zimbardo)
  • 1. Devotion of the employee to the organization
    and its ideology
  • 2. Charismatic leadership
  • 3. Separation from community

147
Using the traits, Arnott devised a Cult Test
that measures from employees point of view the
level of cult immersion (cultedness) in a given
organization.
  • Arnotts concept seems to be an empirical
    response to an intuition of some film directors
    and writers worried about contemporary business
    sometimes becoming a quasi-religion.

148
Devotion
  • 1. I feel a strong sense of loyalty toward this
    company.
  • 2. Even if the firm were not doing well
    financially, I would be reluctant to change to
    another employer.
  • 3. The offer of a bit more money with another
    employer would not seriously make me think of
    changing my job.
  • 4. Based on what I know and what I believe I can
    expect, I would be quite willing to spend rest of
    my career with this company.
  • 5. I believe in the work my organization does.
  • 6. I feel that I am working for a cause that is
    greater than just earning a living.
  • 7. My work serves a good cause.
  • 8. The work of my organization benefits society.

149
Charismatic leadership
  • 9. I have faith in the leader even when things go
    wrong.
  • 10. I admire the leader.
  • 11. It would be hard to find someone who could
    lead this organizations better than the leader.
  • 12. I trust the leaders decision.

150
Separation
  • 13. The major satisfaction in my life come from
    my work.
  • 14. The most important thing that happen to me
    involve my work.
  • 15. My life goals are mainly work-oriented.
  • 16. My work is a large part of who I am.
  • 17. Many of my close personal friends work at
    this company.
  • 18. The organization where I work is always
    planning social events for its employees.
  • 19. I look forward to being with members of my
    immediate work group each day.
  • 20. The people in my immediate work group take a
    personal interest in what I do.

151
It is interesting to see to what extent the
phenomenon described by Arnott is relevant to
societies currently undergoing economic
transformation and less technologically advanced
than the American one.
  • That is why I, together with my colleague as well
    as my students, have been conducting a
    comparative study in Poland based on Arnotts
    idea.
  • We worked out an experimental, Polish versio
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