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Turfgrass Nutrition

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Turfgrass Nutrition Nitrogen tied up in complex formaldehyde molecules Dependent on MO to break down Release faster in warmer, wet weather Ureaformaldehyde ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Turfgrass Nutrition


1
Turfgrass Nutrition
2
Soil Test
  • Six inches deep
  • Mix up a pint
  • When?
  • establishment to till into soil
  • yearly or other year

3
(No Transcript)
4
Nitrogen
  • Deficiency symptoms
  • Chlorosis (yellowing)
  • Turf will look hungry
  • Slow growth
  • Amount of clippings collected

5
Nitrogen
  • Excessive N
  • Reduced root growth
  • Increased shoot to root ratio
  • More shoots, fewer roots

6
Nitrogen
  • Excessive N
  • Increase thatch accumulation

7
Nitrogen
  • Excessive N
  • Succulent growth
  • Prone to disease and insect
  • Cells walls are thinner

8
Phosphorus
  • Importance is in the root growth

9
Phosphorus
  • Starter fertilizers are high in P
  • Limited root systems
  • Higher demand for P during early stages

10
Phosphorus
  • Immobile nutrient
  • Will not move into the soil solution
  • Extremely fibrous root system will get it
  • Fertilizers generally low in P

11
Phosphorus
  • P deficiency
  • Purple discoloration
  • Rarely seen in turf
  • Dont confuse with cold

12
POTASSIUM
  • Stress nutrient
  • Improves heat and cold tolerance

13
POTASSIUM
  • Deficiency symptoms not distinct
  • Best used in 11 ratios with N

14
IRON
  • Micronutrient most likely to be deficient in turf
  • Effects only the foliage applied to, not new
    growth
  • Keeps good color without growth

15
IRON
  • Iron deficiency
  • Chlorosis on new growth
  • High pH soil changes iron to an unusable form

16
IRON
  • Forms of Iron
  • Iron Sulfate
  • Cheap
  • Short lasting
  • Iron Chelate
  • Expensive
  • Keeps iron in a more useable form
  • Longer impact STABLE!

17
CEC, Cation Exchange Capacity
  • Nutrient holding potential of soil
  • Cations are positively charged elements
  • Anions negatively charged

18
CEC, Cation Exchange Capacity
  • Nutrient holding potential
  • Soil particles, particularly clay and OM, have
    negative charge
  • Soil attracts and holds cations
  • K, Ca, Mg, NH4

19
CEC, Cation Exchange Capacity
  • Anions leach through soil
  • NO3 (nitrate)
  • Almost all N is available as NO3
  • Sand has low CEC, thus low fertility

20
Fertilizer
21
Fertilizer Analysis
  • 3 numbers are N - P - K (complete fertilizers)
  • Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Potassium

22
Quick Release Nitrogen
  • Water-soluble
  • Immediately available to plant
  • 1 to 2 week supply
  • Frequent, lower rates
  • Spoon feeding

23
Quick Nitrogen Release
  • High burn potential
  • Do not apply over 1 pound N / 1000 ft2
  • Water in after application
  • Susceptible to leaching

24
Quick Nitrogen Release
  • Inexpensive
  • Urea very common form

25
Too Much Urea
26
Slow Release Nitrogen
  • Extended period of time N is released
  • Generally 6 to 10 weeks

Slow release N response
Quick release N response
27
Slow Nitrogen Release
  • Not all N in package slow release
  • Less burn potential
  • Less susceptible to leaching

28
Coated Slow-release
  • Size variation
  • Larger granules
  • Damage affects N release

29
Sulfur-coated urea (SCU)
  • Urea covered with sulfur and wax
  • MO breaks down the S coating

30
Sulfur-coated urea (SCU)
  • Imperfect release due to imperfections of coating
    and damage
  • Least expensive

31
Polymer-coated
  • Perforated synthetic coating
  • Osmocote most popular (not for turf)
  • 5 to 16 months release
  • Coating thickness

32
Polymer-coated
  • Might be combined with sulfur-coated

33
Non-coated Slow-release
  • Uniform size
  • Smaller granules
  • Less damage

34
Ureaformaldehyde
  • Nitrogen tied up in complex formaldehyde
    molecules
  • Dependent on MO to break down
  • Release faster in warmer, wet weather

35
Ureaformaldehyde
  • Ureaform
  • Nitroform, UF, Blue Chip products
  • Long complex N-chains
  • Slowest release

36
Ureaformaldehyde
  • Methylene Ureas
  • Nutralene products
  • Intermediate N-chains

37
IBDU
  • Isobutylidene Diurea
  • Water releases nitrogen
  • Release not as affected by temperature or MO
  • Particle size affects release

38
Organic
  • Manure, bone meal, sludge
  • MO breaks down
  • Come in very low N
  • May improve soil over time
  • Very low burn potential

39
Organic
  • Milorganite, product of Milwaukee Sewage
    Commission
  • Activated sewage sludge contains 6 N
  • Lower disease and insect

40
Organic
  • Corn Gluten
  • 10 N
  • Also, pre-emergent herbicide

41
Applications
  • Use 1/2 rate in heavy shade
  • Turn off at turns
  • Water immediately
  • Avoid spills that burn grass

42
Application
  • Commercial spreader
  • 30 to 50

43
Application
  • Rotary spreader
  • 6 to 10

44
Application
  • Drop spreader
  • Striping more likely
  • Hand spreader

45
Applications
  • First Application (Nitrogen) end of April

46
Applications
  • Last Application Mid-August with N
  • Sept or Oct apply with P and K

47
Applications
  • Timing
  • Make applications between 4 to 6 weeks apart
    depending on fertilizer

48
Applications
  • Each application 1 pound N / M
  • Bermuda, St. Augustine and zoysia
  • As many as 4 applications per year
  • May, June, July and August

49
Applications
  • Each application 1/2 pound N / M
  • Centipede
  • 2 applications per year
  • May and August
  • Centipede use low P

50
Fertilizer Label
  • Spreader setting on bag

51
NITROGEN FERTILIZATION
  • How many pounds of fertilizer has 1 pound of
    Nitrogen?
  • CALCULATOR
  • 25-3-18 ratio has 25 N
  • 100 pounds of fertilizer
  • Has 25 pounds N

52
NITROGEN FERTILIZATION
  • How many pounds of fertilizer has 1 pound of
    Nitrogen?
  • 100 DIVIDED BY Nitrogen
  • 100 / 25 4
  • 4 pounds of fertilizer (25-3-18)
  • has 1 pound N
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