5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and bust - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and bust

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5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and bust Most likely refers to 1920 s and 1930 s 5.4.1 distinguish between the local, state, and federal levels of ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: 5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and bust


1
5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and
bust Most likely refers to 1920s and 1930s
2
5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and
bust Most likely refers to 1920s and 1930s
JOBS! CONSUMERISM!
3
5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and
bust Most likely refers to 1920s and 1930s
4
5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and
bust Most likely refers to 1920s and 1930s
5
5.2.2 differentiate between an economic boom and
bust Most likely refers to 1920s and 1930s
Boom Bust
Lots of jobs and opportunities for small business and expansion High unemployment
High demand for consumer goods Production falls as demand falls
Moderate or low interest rates Interest rates skyrocket
Credit buying and speculation Excessive credit buying without ability to pay back
6
5.2.3 recognize the concept of buying on credit
Connects mainly to a cause of the Depression -
Too much credit buying led to problems when
production slowed down and people lost their jobs
- couldnt make payments on their Model Ts or
new washing machines or homes.
7
5.2.4 interpret economic issues as expressed in
maps, tables, diagrams, and charts (i.e.,
automobile sales, unemployment rates, or airplane
production)
8
5.2.4 interpret economic issues as expressed in
maps, tables, diagrams, and charts (i.e.,
automobile sales, unemployment rates, or airplane
production)
Great chart to duplicate - students can
interpret. Why more cars in small towns than
large cities? Why more radios in small towns than
large cities? Why more phonographs and pianos in
large cities than small towns? Students must
note the difference in reading a total number and
reading a percentage.
http//www.railsandtrails.com/AutoFacts/1927p38-10
0-8.jpg
9
(No Transcript)
10
5.2.4 interpret economic issues as expressed in
maps, tables, diagrams, and charts (i.e.,
automobile sales, unemployment rates, or airplane
production)
11
5.2.4 interpret economic issues as expressed in
maps, tables, diagrams, and charts (i.e.,
automobile sales, unemployment rates, or airplane
production)
12
5.2.5 analyze how environmental changes and
crisis affected the economy across the nation in
the 1930s (i.e., Dust Bowl, Black Tuesday, Great
Depression, Hoovervilles)
http//www.tnhistoryforkids.org/students/5_history
_5 Section on the Great Depression
13
5.2.5 analyze how environmental changes and
crisis affected the economy across the nation in
the 1930s (i.e., Dust Bowl, Black Tuesday, Great
Depression, Hoovervilles)
http//drought.unl.edu/kids/impacts/dustbowl.htm
Visuals, maps, graphs, even a video of the Dust
Storms
14
5.2.5 analyze how environmental changes and
crisis affected the economy across the nation in
the 1930s (i.e., Dust Bowl, Black Tuesday, Great
Depression, Hoovervilles)
http//pbskids.org/bigapplehistory/business/topic1
9.html http//www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,
8599,1854569,00.html http//www.english.illinois.
edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm http//facts.r
andomhistory.com/2009/04/12_great-depression.html
15
5.2.5 analyze how environmental changes and
crisis affected the economy across the nation in
the 1930s (i.e., Dust Bowl, Black Tuesday, Great
Depression, Hoovervilles)
"Black Tuesday" was the single most devastating
financial day in the history of the New York
Stock Exchange. Within the first few hours the
stock market was open, prices collapsed and wiped
out all the financial gains of the previous year.
Since most Americans viewed the stock market as
the chief indicator of the health of the American
economy, the Great Crash shattered public
confidence. Between October 29 and November 13,
the day when stock prices hit their lowest point,
over 30 billion disappeared from the American
economy. This amount was comparable to the total
amount of money that the federal government had
spent to fight the First World War.
16
5.2.5 analyze how environmental changes and
crisis affected the economy across the nation in
the 1930s (i.e., Dust Bowl, Black Tuesday, Great
Depression, Hoovervilles)
In the 1930s, Hoovervilles (shantytowns) formed
coast to coast in cities of the United States.
Some families were fortunate enough to stay with
friends and family members that hadn't been
evicted yet, but homeless men, women and children
were forced to take up residence in shacks as a
result of the Great Depression. Angry, cold and
hungry Americans, who had no other place to
reside, dubbed groups of those shacks in honor of
President Herbert Hoover.
17
5.2.5 analyze how environmental changes and
crisis affected the economy across the nation in
the 1930s (i.e., Dust Bowl, Black Tuesday, Great
Depression, Hoovervilles)
http//www.42explore2.com/depresn.htm Excellent
summary of economic effects of the
Great Depression Lots of linked websites
18
5.2.6 recognize how Americans used
credit/installment plans to purchase consumer
goods in the 1920s (i.e., vacuum cleaners,
washing machines, radios, and other home
appliances)
http//www.137.com/museum/enerad1.gif
19
5.2.6 recognize how Americans used
credit/installment plans to purchase consumer
goods in the 1920s (i.e., vacuum cleaners,
washing machines, radios, and other home
appliances)
20
5.2.6 recognize how Americans used
credit/installment plans to purchase consumer
goods in the 1920s (i.e., vacuum cleaners,
washing machines, radios, and other home
appliances)
Two strategies that were used by advertisers to
drive sales were largely targeted at stay-at-home
wives. The first was the time-saving factor of
new appliances. Advertisers appealed to
housewives to free themselves from the drudgery
of housework and have more leisure time by using
mechanical devices to speed up labor-intensive
tasks. The second was that savings in costs from
using new and improved products would leave more
disposable income which could then be spent on
luxuries. Processed food advertisements also
stressed the time saved in food preparation.
21
5.2.6 recognize how Americans used
credit/installment plans to purchase consumer
goods in the 1920s (i.e., vacuum cleaners,
washing machines, radios, and other home
appliances)
Installment credit soared during the 1920s. Banks
offered the country's first home mortgages.
Manufacturers of everything--from cars to
irons--allowed consumers to pay "on time." About
60 percent of all furniture and 75 percent of all
radios were purchased on installment plans. In
contrast to a Victorian society that had placed a
high premium on thrift and saving, the new
consumer society emphasized spending and
borrowing. A fundamental shift took place in the
American economy during the 1920s. The nation's
families spent a declining proportion of their
income on necessities--food, clothing, and
utilities--and an increasing share on appliances,
recreation, and a host of new consumer products.
As a result, older industries, such as textiles,
railroads, and steel, declined, while newer
industries, such as appliances, automobiles,
aviation, chemicals, entertainment, and processed
foods, surged ahead rapidly.
22
5.3.1 locate continents and significant bodies
of water (I.e., Great Lakes Atlantic, Arctic,
Pacific oceans Columbia, Missouri, Colorado, Rio
Grande, Ohio, Tennessee, St. Lawrence,
Mississippi rivers)
http//www.worldatlas.com/webimage/testmaps/maps.h
tm
23
5.3.1 locate continents and significant bodies
of water (I.e., Great Lakes Atlantic, Arctic,
Pacific oceans Columbia, Missouri, Colorado, Rio
Grande, Ohio, Tennessee, St. Lawrence,
Mississippi rivers)
24
5.3.1 locate continents and significant bodies
of water (I.e., Great Lakes Atlantic, Arctic,
Pacific oceans Columbia, Missouri, Colorado, Rio
Grande, Ohio, Tennessee, St. Lawrence,
Mississippi rivers)
25
5.3.1 locate continents and significant bodies
of water (I.e., Great Lakes Atlantic, Arctic,
Pacific oceans Columbia, Missouri, Colorado, Rio
Grande, Ohio, Tennessee, St. Lawrence,
Mississippi rivers)
http//www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/nariv.
htm Besides the map, also has brief descriptions
of each river.
26
5.3.2 determine Americas population shifts by
interpreting a population map
27
5.3.2 determine Americas population shifts by
interpreting a population map
http//www.lib.utexas.edu/maps
The big shifts to concentrate on - 1890 census
showed more urban than rural pop for the first
time 1920s - migration of black Americans to
northern cities for jobs during and after WW I
28
5.3.3 locate information from an atlas
entry https//www.cia.gov/library/publications/th
e-world-factbook/ http//www.onlineatlas.us/ htt
p//go.hrw.com/atlas/norm_htm/world.htm
29
5.3.4 locate a major United States city using
latitude and longitude http//www.worldatlas.com/a
atlas/imageg.htm http//www.enchantedlearning.com
/usa/statesbw/
30
5.3.5 identify the physical and political
boundaries of TN
31
5.3.6 locate the 50 states using a map with each
state outlined.
32
5.3.7 recognize and compare landforms, climate,
and natural resources of the three grand
divisions of TN http//www.tnhistoryforkids.org/ge
ography/e_4 An entire section on the 3 grand
divisions
Also see Grand Divisions resource activity in
shared server!
33
5.3.8 interpret a climograph
34
5.4.1 distinguish between the local, state, and
federal levels of the legislative, executive, and
judicial branches of the American government.
Branch Federal State Local
Executive President Governor Mayor or County Judge
Legislative Congress - House of Reps and Senate TN General Assembly City Council or County Commission
Judicial Supreme Court State Supreme Court District, circuit, and county courts
35
5.4.2 select examples using illustrations of
First Amendment freedoms (i.e., speech, assembly,
and religion) Does illustrations mean pictures
only??
36
5.4.3 recognize the rights established by the
13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments
13th Abolished slavery
14th Citizenship for African-American males
15th Right to vote for African-American males
19th Womens suffrage - right to vote
37
5.4.4 recognize the differences between the TN
state constitution and the U.S. Constitution
U.S. CONSTITUTION 1788 TN CONSTITUTION 1870
Legislative Branch - Congress Full time lawmakers Legislative Branch - General Assembly - part time lawmakers
Executive Branch - President Veto power - takes 2/3 vote of Congress to override Executive Branch - Governor Veto power - takes a simple majority in General Assembly to override
Judicial Branch - U.S. Supreme Court - judges serve for life Judicial Branch - TN Supreme Court - judges serve 8 yr terms
Bill of Rights - first 10 amendments - covers basic rights like trial by jury, freedom of speech and religion, etc. Declaration of Rights - contains basically the same rights as Bill of Rights
38
5.4.5 differentiate among the purposes stated in
the Declaration of Independence, the U.S.
Constitution, and the Bill of Rights
Declaration of Independence Listed natural
rights of life, liberty, pursuit of
happiness Purpose of government is to secure
those rights for all Americans
39
5.4.5 differentiate among the purposes stated in
the Declaration of Independence, the U.S.
Constitution, and the Bill of Rights
  • U.S. Constitution - purposes are listed in the
    Preamble
  • Form a tighter union
  • Establish justice
  • Insure domestic tranquility
  • Provide for the common defense
  • Promote the general welfare
  • Secure the blessings of liberty for posterity

40
5.4.5 differentiate among the purposes stated in
the Declaration of Independence, the U.S.
Constitution, and the Bill of Rights
Bill of Rights First 10 amendments Lists the
individual freedoms of all Americans By putting
them in written form, they would be clearly
established
41
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade resources.)
42
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade resources.)
http//mappinghistory.uoregon.edu/english/US/map16
.html
43
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade resources.)
1619 First slaves to Jamestown (South)
1787 Northwest Ordinance forbade slavery in Old Northwest territory and pattern continued across the north and west
1808 Constitutional ban on importing slaves begins - all slaves now auctioned in the South
1820 Missouri Compromise - draws line at 36 30 - slavery forbidden in northern part of LA Purchase
1850 Compromise of 1850 - slavery contained in the South - popular sovereignty to determine Mexican Cession territory Fugitive Slave Law - heightens tensions between N and S
1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act - nullifies the Missouri Compromise line
1857 Dred Scott Decision - states slaves are property and can be transported anywhere in U.S.
44
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade resources.)
http//web000.greece.k12.ny.us/SocialStudiesResour
ces/Social_Studies_Resources/SS_8_Documents/SS_8_D
ocuments_06.05/UnionResources-2005.jpg
45
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade resources.)
http//web000.greece.k12.ny.us/SocialStudiesResour
ces/Social_Studies_Resources/SS_8_Documents/SS_8_D
ocuments_06.04/CivilWar-2004.jpg
46
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade resources.)
47
5.5.1 interpret sectional differences in the
North and South in pre-Civil War (i.e., map of
the Union, Confederate, and border states
pictorial representations of crop production
reading timelines and interpreting bar graphs
showing human, natural, and manmade
resources.) http//www2.lhric.org/pocantico/civil
war/graphs.htm - bar graphs by students http//ww
w.teacheroz.com/Civil_War_Causes.htm - all kinds
of info on Civil War to click and look over
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