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The Declaration of Independence

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The Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson Eudemonism (Gr. hedone pleasure) The view that happiness is the highest good. Some writers take this to designate the ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: The Declaration of Independence


1
The Declaration of Independence
  • Thomas Jefferson

2
Name that Thomas
3
Designer Tommy Hilfiger
4
International Celebrity Tommy Lee Jones
5
Famed WriterThomas Hardy
6
Musician Tommy Lee
7
Inventor Thomas Edison
8
Paleontologist Thomas HoltzUniversity of
Maryland
9
Leader Diplomat Thomas the Train
10
Thomas Jefferson was all of them.
11
TJs Biography
  • Architect
  • Designer
  • Botanist
  • Governor of Virginia
  • Paleontologist
  • Writer
  • Musician
  • Diplomat
  • 3rd President of the United States

12
TJs Biography
  • 1746-1826
  • Born in Virginia
  • Lived on an estate of 5,000 acres
  • Father died when Thomas was 14
  • Jefferson died on the morning of July 4, several
    hours before Adams

13
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16
Fun Fact to Discuss at Parties
  • Both Ben Franklin and John Adams, the New England
    patriot, declined to write the Declaration.
  • Adams told Jefferson
  • A Virginian ought to lead the business
  • I (Adams) am obnoxious and unpopular
  • You (Jefferson) write ten times better than me

17
The Declaration of Independence
18
Summary of From The Autobiography The
Declaration of Independence
  • This selection from Jeffersons autobiography
    shows how the Second Continental Congress altered
    his original draft to produce the final draft.

19
Summary of From The Autobiography The
Declaration of Independence
  • He recounts how the Congress ruled out passages
    renouncing kinship with the English people (to
    avoid offense) and passages banning slavery
    (slave-holding colonies may oppose the
    Declaration)

20
Summary of From The Autobiography The
Declaration of Independence
  • He presents his full version with the underlined
    portions deleted.
  • What Congress added was placed in the margins.

21
The 1st 2nd Paragraphs
  • The first paragraphs purpose is to state why
    independence is being declared.
  • The second paragraph describes the ideal
    relationship between a people and its government,
    outlines the conditions for rebellion.
  • The second paragraph asserts that the British
    king creates such hostile conditions

22
  • When in the Course of human events it becomes
    necessary for one people to dissolve the
    political bands which have connected them with
    another and to assume among the powers of the
    earth, the separate and equal station to which
    the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle
    them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind
    requires that they should declare the causes
    which impel them to the separation.
  • Introductory paragraph

23
Brace Yourself for the Next Slide
24
  • We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all
    men are created equal, that they are endowed by
    their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,
    that among these are Life, Liberty and the
    pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these
    rights, Governments are instituted among Men,
    deriving their just powers from the consent of
    the governed, That whenever any Form of
    Government becomes destructive of these ends, it
    is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish
    it, and to institute new Government, laying its
    foundation on such principles and organizing its
    powers in such form, as to them shall seem most
    likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
  • 1st half of 2nd paragraph

25
The Next 20 Paragraphs
  • Many are composed of a single long sentence.
  • They cite specific examples of the kings abuses
  • The last 5 paragraphs develop the ideas of the
    first two and solemnly declare the independence
    of the United States from allegiance to the
    British crown

26
Brace Yourself for the Next Slide (again)
27
Notice the syntax of this paragraph
  • He has combined with others to subject us to a
    jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and
    unacknowledged by our laws giving his Assent to
    their Acts of pretended Legislation for
    quartering large bodies of armed troops among us
    for protecting them, by a mock Trial from
    punishment for any Murders which they should
    commit on the Inhabitants of these States for
    cutting off our Trade with all parts of the
    world for imposing Taxes on us without our
    Consent for depriving us in many cases, of the
    benefit of Trial by Jury for transporting us
    beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences
    for abolishing the free System of English Laws in
    a neighboring Province, establishing therein an
    Arbitrary government, and enlarging its
    Boundaries so as to render it at once an example
    and fit instrument for introducing the same
    absolute rule into these Colonies for taking
    away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable
    Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our
    Governments for suspending our own Legislatures,
    and declaring themselves invested with power to
    legislate for us in all cases whatsoever.

28
The Declaration of Independenceby John Trumbell
(1756-1843)
29
The Following Slides are Guiding Questions for
In-class Discussions.
  • Please establish norms for the classroom.

30
  • What does freedom and responsibility mean to you?
  • Are these rights something you take for granted,
    or do you hold them precious?
  • Comment on how you regard freedom and equality.

31
  • For Locke, to be legitimate, government must
    protect your rights. Is that enough?
  • What if you never get to have a say in what
    government does?

32
  • You are free by nature, thinks Locke, but there
    is a difference between freedom and license.
  • Is Locke right to argue that it is possible to
    abuse a freedom that one has a right to?

33
  • Locke thinks that government should be guided by
    majority rule. He also thinks that government
    exists to protect the unalienable right to
    property.
  • Are these ideas in conflict? What if a poor
    majority wants to tax a rich minority?

34
Eudemonism (Gr. hedone pleasure)
  • The view that happiness is the highest good.
  • Some writers take this to designate the view that
    pleasure is the highest good, but that view is
    more properly called hedonism.
  • Happiness and pleasure are distinct notions.

35
Our Government and Justice
  • There are times when the only way to prevent harm
    to a large number of people is to harm a smaller
    number of people. Is it always permissible to
    harm a smaller number in order to prevent harm to
    a large number?

36
  • Suppose an American has planted a bomb in New
    York City, and it will explode in twenty-four
    hours unless the police are able to find it.
    Should it be legal for the police to use torture
    to extract information from the suspected bomber?

37
  • Suppose an American has planted a bomb in New
    York City, and it will explode in twenty-four
    hours unless the police are able to find it.
    Should it be legal for the police to use torture
    to extract information from the suspected bomber?

38
  • Today, freedom and equality are guaranteed for
    you and people of all races, religions, and
    genders, according to the laws of the United
    States. Every citizen is guaranteed equal and
    fair treatment under the laws and the freedom to
    openly express ideas. Every citizen is also
    guaranteed the right to vote.

39
  • However, this was not always the case. When the
    Declaration of Independence was written, only
    white males who owned property could vote.

40
Discussing Inequalities
  • In pairs, research where we still find
    inequalities or injustices today. Look beyond the
    borders of the U.S. perhaps.
  • Place your findings on Google Slides
  • We will share our findings with the class.

41
Choose One Topic
  • After finding a topic, write it on the board to
    your right (reserve it).
  • Seven slides (minimum)
  • Title
  • Seven facts about your topic (minimum) (10
    points)
  • Three related images (5 points)
  • Three questions for the class (5 points)
  • Works Cited page (10 points)

42
  • Point Value 30

43
Any Questions?
44
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