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Setting a Purpose and Backwards Design: Structuring a Content Area Reading/Thinking Lesson

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Setting a Purpose and Backwards Design: Structuring a Content Area Reading/Thinking Lesson EDC448 Dr. Julie Coiro – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Setting a Purpose and Backwards Design: Structuring a Content Area Reading/Thinking Lesson


1
Setting a Purpose and Backwards Design
Structuring a Content Area Reading/Thinking Lesson
  • EDC448
  • Dr. Julie Coiro

2
Agenda
  • Diverse Text Set Questions?
  • Activity Setting Your Purpose
  • Activity Designing Your Goals
  • Review Lesson Plan Assignment
  • Looking ahead on syllabus and previewing homework

3
Diverse Text Set
  • 10 Texts around a theme/topic select to make
    more accessible and maintain rigor
  • Examples are on the wikispace
  • Questions?
  • Optional reading Laura Robbs Text Sets article

4
Past Topics for Discussion
  • What do good readers do? (MMDAAVISS)
  • How do good readers make sense of challenging
    texts? (wondering, inquiry)
  • Do texts in each discipline require specific
    strategies?
  • How skilled are adolescent readers?
  • How can I make my thinking visible?
  • How do issues of text complexity and instruction
    influence rigor accessibility?

5
Todays Learning Objectives
  • Understand the importance of setting a clear and
    relevant purpose for reading learning
  • Understand how to plan a lesson using Backwards
    Design principles
  • Connect the main components of a good content
    literacy lesson (before, during, and after) to
    your lesson plan assignment
  • Craft a learning objective about reading in your
    content area that is clear, precise, and
    measurable

6
Why Am I Reading This?Tovani, Chapter 5
  • Defining Purposes for Reading What is essential
    for students to know?
  • What two places may cause difficulty?
  • What will you model to help students negotiate
    the difficult parts?
  • What do they need to DO with the information once
    they finish reading?
  • How will you hold their thinking while they read?

ACTIVITY 1
Text complexity
Think-Aloud
ACTIVITY 2
Annotations, Reading Guides, Graphic Organizers,
Two Column-Journals
7
Activity 1
  • Purpose is Everything
  • Circle what you think is important.
  • Underline places in the text a robber would find
    important.
  • Squiggly line under places that a prospective
    home buyer might think are important.
  • Which time was the hardest? Why?

8
Working Backwardsto design a good lesson
9
Designing An Educational Trip to France
  • OBJECTIVE (poorly written) Students will learn
    more about culture, geography, history, and
    language by visiting Paris for 2 weeks.
  • Groups 1 List the educational activities you
    will plan for students.
  • Groups 2 List what you hope students will
    understand when they return from their trip.

10
Learning Objectives for Paris Trip
  • Educational Activities
  • Check out famous sites (Eiffel Tower, Arc du
    Triumphe)
  • Take a tour of Versailles palace with
    questionnaire to compile learning of relevant
    content
  • Go to Louvre questionnaire discover artists
    and paintings
  • Nightlife Go see traditional/authentic play and
    learn culture and go to dinner (authentic
    cuisine)
  • Practice speaking the language guided by speaking
    packet
  • What will students understand?
  • Experience real world use (colloquialism, slang
    words)
  • Identify geographical features of certain
    historical events and identify where these events
    took place on a map
  • Understand role of religion in culture
  • Hands-on interaction with historical sites
    connect to prior knowledge and real-life
    experiences
  • Identify food, art, and interactions with locals
    to examine reflect on French peoples social
    networks and daily lives

11
Why Backwards Design? (Wiggins McTighe, 2005)
  • Twin-sins of traditional lesson design
  • Hands-on without being minds-on engaging
    experiences that lead only accidentally, if at
    all, to insight achievement
  • Coverage marching through the text and/or
    curriculum to cover as many facts as possible

12
Understanding by Design
  • To understand
  • To wisely and effectively USE (transfer) what we
    know in a certain context
  • To APPLY knowledge skill effectively
  • What are your desired results?
  • Start your lesson design with these resultsnot
    with your instructional methods and activities
  • Communicate your desired results with clear
    purposes and explicit performance goals

13
Understanding by Design
  • 1. Identify desired results
  • What should students know, understand, and be
    able to do? How does this connect with your
    standards?
  • 2. Determine acceptable evidence
  • How will you know if students have achieved the
    desired results? What will you accept as
    evidence of proficiency?
  • 3. Plan learning experiences and instruction
  • What are the most appropriate instructional
    activities that students will need to equip them
    with the needed knowledge and skills?

14
Understanding the Main Components of Your Lesson
Plan Assignment(Start to think about a topic,
text, and a lesson objective)
15
Elements of Your Content Literacy Lesson Plan
Assignment
  • Context of the Lesson
  • Objectives and Standards
  • Opportunities to Learn
  • Instructional Procedures (pre, during, and
    closure) - Explicit modeling is critical
  • Assessment
  • Reflection

Connect these pieces Buehls three parts (1)
Frontloading learning, (2) guiding comprehension,
and (3) consolidating learning
16
Promote Strategy Use and Independence by
Gradually Releasing Responsibility
Model, think-aloud, and SCAFFOLD your strategy
support note Beuhls three phases of instruction
in Ch. 2
17
Key Reading Strategies(MM DAVIS)
SYNTHESIZE
MAKE CONNECTIONS
DETERMINE IMPORTANT IDEAS
SUMMARIZE
MONITOR AND CLARIFY
INFER PREDICT
ASK QUESTIONS
VISUALIZE
ANALYZE
18
Lesson Plan Pieces to Hand In (Refer to this
slide!)
  • Typed plan in lesson plan template (download from
    the wikispace)
  • Hard copy of your 2 texts with relevant
    think-aloud notes on text or stickies (mark up
    your text explicit commentary of your thoughts
    about the strategy you are modeling)
  • Graphic organizer with title directions
  • Assessment task with finished example
  • Your completed points sheet with questions
  • Your final reflection (after taught)

19
Introducing/Contextualizing your lesson
  • How do you hook your students?
  • Images, discrepant events, interactive websites,
    videos, picture books, current events,
    anticipation guides
  • Contextualize your lesson in this and RETURN to
    it at the end of your lesson to tie it all up and
    connect to their world!

20
Linking Lessons to the Standards
  • Be explicit - Kids have a right to know!

21
Writing Learning Objectives for your Lesson
Plans
22
Three Criteria for a Learning Objective
  • Clear
  • Usually just one sentence
  • Precise
  • Precise verbs that reflect the thinking your
    students will be doing
  • Set a context (Given After Before)
  • Measurable
  • How will you measure the quality (age or
    criteria met)
  • Start with the top level and work backwards
    through average and below average

23
Writing Learning Objectives
  • Given _____, students will _____ (verb and
    specifics) with (measurable) ____ accuracy or
    to a certain level
  • Content What will students learn?
  • Reading Process How will students
    think/interact/engage with this content material?
  • (see Common Core Standards in your discipline
    and narrative or informational text)

24
Link reading/thinking strategy objectives to your
content
  • The student will
  • Set a purpose for reading
  • Predict and confirm
  • Summarize the key words
  • Monitor their understanding of
  • Ask questions/reflect
  • Show the relationship between concepts
  • Make inferences and support with evidence
  • Draw conclusions
  • Make connections between
  • Visualize

25
Some examples - English
  • CONTENT Given a set of quotes, students will
    write a dialogue poem with high-level descriptive
    verbs to relate to the main character in Speak.
  • READING/THINKING Given a graphic organizer,
    students will make inferences and connections
    from their quote set to examine the advantages
    and disadvantages of being an outcast in society.

26
Example - History
  • CONTENT Students will summarize the main points
    to two sides of the argument about whether or not
    Japanese American internment camps were
    necessary.
  • READING/THINKING Students will write an essay
    that compares and contrasts the prisoners views
    and the governments views of the internment
    camps.

27
Example - Science
  • CONTENT Given a graphic organizer, students will
    identify three differences between human and
    marine animal sound reception and three
    structures used by marine animals for sound
    reception with 80 accuracy.
  • READING/THINKING Given graphic organizers and a
    guided note outline, students will organize main
    concepts on sound reception in Ch. 6, while
    identifying supporting ideas and identifying
    relationships between different anatomical sound
    receptors in marine animals with 80 accuracy.

28
Example - Math
  • CONTENT Students will solve for a single
    variable involving two-step equations to 85
    accuracy.
  • READING/THINKING PROCESS Students will recognize
    key phrases that correspond to an equation and
    formulate the correct equation from a given word
    problem involving a two-step equation to 85
    accuracy.

29
Example Foreign Language
  • CONTENT Students will work collaboratively to
    create a French menu that shows their
    understanding of the French culture, new
    vocabulary, and creativity.
  • READING/THINKING Given a sample restaurant
    dialogue in a French restaurant, students will
    interpret the meaning of key vocabulary in
    context and categorize the term as either food,
    verbs you would use in a restaurant, or items you
    would find in a restaurant.

30
Questions about Lesson Plan?
31
Todays Learning Objectives
  • Review the lesson planning resources in your
    Strategy Guides text
  • Connect the main components of a good content
    literacy lesson to your lesson plan assignment
  • Begin planning your lesson using Backwards Design
    principles
  • Craft a learning objective about reading in your
    content area that is clear, precise, and
    measurable
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