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Title: This presentation will explain your rights and responsibilities on the job and will tell you what Ontario


1
INTRODUCTION
  • This presentation will explain your rights and
    responsibilities on the job and will tell you
    what Ontarios Occupational Health Safety Act
    (OHSA) expects from your employer, your
    supervisor and you. These are things you need to
    know and understand so that you can be safe at
    work today and everyday.
  • Everyone in the workplace, from the employer to
    the newest worker, has different but important
    duties to keep the workplace safe. Because
    employers have the most authority in the
    workplace, they have the greatest responsibility
    but its important for your own safety that you
    understand everyones health and safety duties,
    including yours.

2
INTRODUCTION
Preventing injuries and illness starts here, with
the things that you learn in this presentation
but it doesnt end here. One of the employers
duties under the OHSA is to give you specific
information and instructions about how to stay
safe on your job. What you learn from this
information will help you start to understand
those instructions. We hope you will use what you
learn here every day of your working life.
Under Ontario law, all workers and supervisors
must take health and safety awareness training.
Individual departments/ supervisors/ managers
are still responsible for providing
workplace-specific training and procedures.
3
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SAFETY LAW
4
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SAFETY LAW
  • In Canada, Occupational Health and Safety laws
    have been put in place either federally or
    provincially, to protect the health and safety of
    all workers.
  • Basically, the occupational health and safety
  • responsibilities of these governments are to
  • Enforce applicable legislation
  • Conduct workplace inspections and investigations
  • Distribute information on legislation
  • Resolve health and safety disputes, and
  • Promote training, education and research

Want to challenge the test? Think you are
familiar enough with the information provided in
the 5 modules? Then challenge the
test! http//www.ryerson.ca/irm/training/ehs_orien
tation.html
5
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SAFETY LAW
Each province and territory in Canada has health
and safety legislation, which include both Acts
and regulations. Occupational Health and
Safety Acts are known as minimal requirements
outlined by a province or territory to employ
workplace health and safety practices. In
addition to each Act are regulations that
complement and provide further laws specific to
high-risk sectors. Because each province and
territory has its own legislation, occupational
health and safety responsibilities will vary
slightly from province to province.
6
APPLICATION
  • What Ontario legislation applies to workplace
    health safety?
  • The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) is
    Ontario's cornerstone legislation for workplace
    health and safety. Other contributing legislation
    includes the Workplace Safety and Insurance
    Act (WSIA), Part II of which deals with the
    prevention of occupational injury and disease and
    the Human Rights Code, which often has to be
    considered in dealing with OHS issues.
    Both OHSA and WSIA are available along with all
    of Ontario's other Acts and regulations at
    the e-Laws website.

7
REQUIREMENTS
In general, what does the OHSA require? The main
purpose of the Act is to provide a legal
framework and establish minimum standards for the
health and safety of workers on the job. It sets
out duties for all workplace parties and rights
for workers. Along with its accompanying
regulations, establishes processes for dealing
with workplace hazards and provides for
enforcement of the law where compliance has not
been achieved voluntarily. Fundamental to the
successful working of OHSA is the
workplace Internal Responsibility System (IRS).
8
COVERED
  • Who is covered by the OHSA?
  • OHSA applies to almost every worker, supervisor,
    employer and workplace in Ontario, including
    workplace owners, constructors and suppliers of
    equipment or materials to workplaces covered by
    the Act. OHSA does not apply to
  • Work done by the owner or occupant, or a servant,
    in a private residence or on the connected
    landSection 3(1)
  • Workplaces under federal jurisdiction, although
    federal authorities accept that outside
    contractors and their employees, while in federal
    workplaces, are under provincial jurisdiction.

9
FEDERAL
  • What are Federal workplaces and how are they
    regulated?
  • Workplaces under federal jurisdiction are
    regulated by the Canada Labour Code, which is
    administered by Human Resources and Skills
    Development Canada.
  • The OHSA does not apply to
  • post offices
  • airlines and airports
  • banks
  • some grain elevators
  • telecommunication companies, and
  • interprovincial trucking, shipping, railway and
    bus companies.

10
REGULATIONS
  • What regulations have been made under the OHSA?
  • Regulations made under OHSA may be sector,
  • work or hazard specific.
  • Sector-specific regulations apply to a particular
    sector.
  • There are sector-specific regulations for
  • Industrial Establishments
  • Construction Projects
  • Mines and Mining Plants
  • Health Care and Residential Facilities
  • Certain types of hazardous work are covered by
    their own regulations
  • Diving Operations
  • Window Cleaning
  • Offshore Oil and Gas Production
  • Confined Spaces

11
REGULATIONS
  • What regulations have been made under the OSHA
  • Health hazards are either covered by the sector
    regulations or separate hazard-specific
    regulations, including
  • Designated Substances Regulation
  • Designated Substance - Asbestos on Construction
    Projects and in Buildings and Repair Operations
  • Regulation respecting the Control of Exposure to
    Biological or Chemical Agents
  • Regulation respecting X-Ray Safety
  • Needle Safety

12
REGULATIONS
There is also a fourth set of regulations that do
not fall into these categories Some clarify
requirements in OHSA, such as defining "critical
injury", or specifying that the employer must pay
for JHSC member certification training. Others
extend the application of OHSA examples are the
regulations for farming operations, or for
teachers and for university academics and
teaching assistants. The most far-reaching of
these regulations is the Workplace Hazardous
Materials Information System (WHMIS) regulation.
13
OHSA CONSOLIDATED EDITION
A hard copy of the most recent Pocket
Ontario OHS Act Regulations is kept at
Security -- 111 Bond Street available
24/7/365 Each Union Office and Faculty Deans
Office is provided with a hard copy.
14
ENFORCEMENT
  • How are OSHA and its regulations enforced?
  • The Ministry's goal is for all workplaces to
    achieve self-compliance with OSHA and regulations
    through a well-functioning Internal
    Responsibility System (IRS). Where this does not
    happen, progressive enforcement results.
    Enforcement begins with the issuing of orders and
    may proceed to prosecution. Inspectors are the
    enforcement arm of the Ministry of Labour their
    role includes the following
  • inspection of workplaces
  • issuing of orders where there is a contravention
    of OHSA or its regulations (orders)
  • issuing Summary Conviction Notices (Tickets)
    for a range of offences on-site
  • tickets can also be issued to workers for unsafe
    acts as well as for supervisors and employers
  • investigation of accidents and work refusals
  • resolution of disputes
  • recommendation of prosecution.

15
ENFORCEMENT
Ministry of Labour (MOL) Inspectors have broad
powers to, among other things, inspect any
workplace, investigate any potentially hazardous
situation and work refusal, order compliance with
the Act and its regulations and initiate
prosecutions.
16
MOL INSPECTORS
  • Inspectors have the power to
  • Enter a workplace without notice or warrant
  • Request for JHSC worker member be present
  • Question any employee privately or in a group
  • Make recommendations to meet compliance
  • Take photographs
  • Require hygiene or engineering testing
  • Review and make copies of workplace documents
    including training documents
  • Require a workplace to be undisturbed for the
    purposes of an investigation, inspection or test
  • Seize anything that is given to, or in plain view
    of the inspector, that is thought to be in
    contravention of the legislation

If a MOL Inspector arrives at your work
site, contact IRM (7086) who will liaise with the
MOL on the Universitys behalf. After hours
contact Security at 416-979-5040
17
MOL INSPECTOR ORDERS
POSTING OF ORDERS AND FIELD VISIT REPORTS The
employer must post a copy of any MOL order or
field visit report the orders or field
reports are posted on the main university
board at the entrance of 350 Victoria Street
18
PENALTIES
  • What are the penalties for not complying with the
    OHSA and its regulations?
  • The maximum penalties for a contravention
    of OHSA or its regulations are set out in OHSA
    Section 66.
  • A successful prosecution could, for each
    conviction, result in
  • A fine of up to 25,000 for an individual person
    and/or up to 12 months imprisonment
  • A fine of up to 500,000 for a corporation.
  • Criminal charges can be laid against corporation,
    defined organizations and individuals
    (supervisors, managers, directors, members of the
    board, executives, etc.)

19
TICKETING
  • Ministry of Labour Inspectors can issue tickets
    for an observed contravention of a Regulation
    under the OHSA (similar to a speeding ticket)
  • Tickets can be issued at 3 levels within an
    organization to the worker, the supervisor and
    to the employer
  • Penalties vary between 200 and 300
  • Of primary focus for ticketing are high risk
    activities, such as failure to guard machines,
    lack of guarding around work surfaces or
    openings, lack of protective devices for
    electrical work or when working at heights, lack
    of personal protective equipment and unsafe work
    with lifting devices.

20
GENERAL PROVISIONS
It is the responsibility of every manager and
supervisor to be well informed of the
Occupational Health and Safety laws that are
applicable to the workplace over which they have
authority. These general provisions give
employers the independence to carry out
measures and control procedures that are
appropriate for their individual workplaces. The
challenge for employers and supervisors however,
is to fully understand health and safety
legislation and to know when they have fulfilled
all appropriate regulatory requirements
SIGNIFICANCE It is important for all owners,
employers, supervisors and constructors to be
aware of the regulations that apply specifically
to the work being done and that they have an
obligation to know and comply with these
regulations.
21
WORKERS SUPERVISORS EMPLOYERS
22
DUTIES OF WORKERS
  • DUTIES
  • Follow the law and the workplace health and
    safety policies and procedures
  • Always wear or use protective equipment required
    by the employer
  • Work and act in a way that does not endanger
    themselves or another worker
  • Report any hazard, workplace injuries or
    incidents to their supervisor (including threats
    and attempts of workplace violence)
  • A supervisor is also considered a worker under
    OHSA and has the same rights and duties as a
    worker.

23
RIGHTS OF WORKERS
  • RIGHT TO KNOW
  • Workers have the right to know about hazards in
    their workplace. This includes being informed
    about hazards by the University and their
    supervisors, and the right to ask questions
    without fear of reprisals about hazards in their
    job.
  • Examples of questions include
  • What are the hazards of this job?
  • Is there any special training required?
  • Do I have the right protective equipment?
  • If I have questions about safety, who do I ask?
  • You should know where your nearest first aid
    station is located and how to contact trained
    first aiders

24
RIGHTS OF WORKERS
  • RIGHT TO REFUSE UNSAFE WORK
  • A worker has the right to refuse unsafe work if
    he or she has reason to believe the work is
    dangerous, meaning the work he/she is doing, the
    area in which he/she is working, or a machine/
    equipment/tool he/she is using may endanger
    him/her or another worker.

RIGHT TO PARTICPATE Workers can participate in
workplace health and safety by reporting hazards
they see to their supervisor, asking questions
about hazards and how to work safely, and being
safety role models for others. Workers can also
participate as Health and Safety Representatives
and as members of a Joint Health and Safety
Committee (JHSC)
25
RIGHT TO REFUSE UNSAFE WORK AT RYERSON
  • Process at Ryerson
  • A worker may exercise the right to refuse work if
    they believe a hazardous situation exists,
    including where the worker has reason to believe
    that workplace violence is likely to endanger
    himself or herself.
  • The workers supervisor must promptly investigate
    the work refusal in the presence of the worker
    and one of the following persons
  • a Ryerson JHSC worker representative, or
  • a worker who is selected by a trade union that
    represents the worker.
  • If the worker continues to refuse work after the
    investigation, the Director, IRM must be
    notified.
  • If the situation cannot be resolved by the
    Director, IRM, the matter will be referred to the
    Ministry of Labour.

26
RIGHT TO REFUSE UNSAFE WORK AT RYERSON
  • Prior to the investigation by the Director, IRM
    or the Ministry of Labour, no worker is allowed
    to use or operate any equipment, machine, or
    device, or work in the area to be investigated
    unless, in the presence of a worker
    representative, a health and safety
    representative, or a worker who is selected by a
    trade union, the worker has been advised of the
    work refusal and the reasons for the work
    refusal.
  • A Ministry of Labour inspector will investigate
    the refusal to work in consultation with
  • the employer or a person representing the
    employer,
  • the worker,
  • a Ryerson Health and Safety Committee worker
    representative, or
  • a worker who is selected by a trade union that
    represents the worker.
  • After completing the investigation, the Ministry
    of labour inspector will provide all involved
    persons with a copy of the decision in writing

27
RIGHT TO REFUSE UNSAFE WORK
If you have any concerns regarding health
and safety in the workplace, you should
report it first to your supervisor who will
try to resolve the matter. The Departmental
Safety Officer (DSO), the JHSC Member and IRM may
also be contacted for assistance.
HAVE A CONCERN?
The University will investigate cases of
workplace violence as outlined in the
Universitys Workplace Violence Prevention and
Response Program.
28
RIGHTS OF WORKERS
  • Its against the law for your employer or
    your supervisor to fire or
  • punish you for doing what the OHSA expects
    you to do, or because
  • you asked them to do what the OHSA expects
    them to do.
  • Its even against the law for your employer or
    supervisor to threaten to fire or punish you for
    these things.
  • The OHSA is very clear on this. If you feel that
    your employer is taking action against you for
    raising a health and safety concern, you can
    discuss it with a union official if you are a
    member of a union, or bring a complaint to the
    Ontario Labour Relations Board. If youre not
    sure what to do, you can call the Ministrys
    toll-free number for information.
  • The Office of the Worker Adviser also provides
    free advice and representation to non-unionized
    workers who are in this situation. You can call
    their toll-free number for help 1-855-659-7744.

NO REPRISALS for following the law!
29
CALLING THE MOL
  • Ministry of Labour inspectors cant be in all
    workplaces at all times. But the Ministry wants
    to hear if theres a problem on the job that
    isnt fixed.
  • So it has a toll-free number that you can call.
  • Calling that number connects you to the Health
    and Safety Contact Centre that takes calls 24
    hours a day, seven days a week.
  • If you dont want to give your name when you call
    the Health and Safety Contact Centre, you dont
    have to. Here is the number 1-877-202-0008

30
DUTIES OF EMPLOYERS
  • Inform and educate workers about hazards in their
    workplace and how to work safely
  • Appoint competent supervisors who know the work,
    know the hazards present and know the applicable
    laws and regulations
  • Create written health and safety polices
    (reviewed annually), develop programs and
    procedures to implement this policy, post the
    policy in the workplace and make sure they are
    being followed
  • Ensure workers follow the law and the procedures
    and policies at your workplace
  • Take steps to eliminate hazards in the workplace
    and where elimination is not possible, to control
    them
  • Provide personal protective equipment (PPE) and
    ensure its proper use and maintenance
  • Take every precaution reasonable to ensure the
    safety of workers AND THE PUBLIC (known as the
    general duty clause)

31
SUPERVISORS DUTIES RESPONSIBILITIES
  • Some basic duties of the supervisor are
  • Inform and educate workers about hazards in their
    workplace and how to work safely
  • Ensure workers follow the law and any workplace
    procedures and policies
  • Make sure workers wear and use the right personal
    protective equipment
  • Take every precaution reasonable to ensure the
    safety of workers and the public

Every supervisor is also a worker with the
same rights and responsibilities as any other
worker. Supervisors are responsible for
listening to and addressing health and safety
issues as they arise. A supervisor can contact
his/her manager or EHS to discuss any health and
safety issues.
32
SUPERVISORS ROLE
  • Know the OHSA and how relevant Regulations apply
    to your workplace
  • Know the hazards
  • Inform workers of potential and actual hazards
    and how to work safely (especially new, young
    workers and persons coming back from an extended
    period of time off)
  • Ensure work is performed safely plan, monitor,
    remind and enforce
  • Ensure tools and equipment are properly
    maintained and guarded (where applicable)
  • Continually monitor for and anticipate new
    hazards
  • Be a health and safety role model

33
SUPERVISORS ROLE
  • Listen to health and safety concerns from your
    workers, colleagues, students, public
  • Maintain Documentation
  • Written safe work procedures
  • Safety training content, attendance
  • Resolution of safety concerns
  • Discussing with/referring health and safety
    issues to line management based on the situation
  • Asking for assistance if needed

34
WHO IS A SUPERVISOR AT RYERSON?
  • Any employee in a supervisory position AND/OR
  • Any employee that has some supervisory functions
    AND/OR
  • Any employee in charge of a classroom, lab, shop
    or studio

POSITIONS THAT MEET SUPERVISOR CRITERIA AT
RYERSON Executive Deans Directors (Academic and
Administrative) Chairs  Managers Coordinators Facu
lty (Full time, Part time, Casual) Instructors
(Full time, Part time, Casual)  Technical
Officers  Technicians Lead Hands Teaching
Assistants/Graduate Assistants
  • SIGNIFICANCE
  • In the event of a serious accident, the courts
    look at the
  • job functions of your position You can still be
    part of an
  • union and still be considered a supervisor
    under the law.

35
DUTIES OF EMPLOYERS SUPERVISORS HOW TO SEND THE
RIGHT MESSAGE
As a supervisor you need to follow the workplace
safety procedures, wear your personal protective
equipment and stay safe. If you dont do those
things, others will think its okay to not follow
the workplace safety procedures. People are
watching you and learning from what you do. How
you supervise the work, the way you think about
the work and talk about it, can affect the safety
of the people you supervise.
Telling people to work in a safe and healthy way
isnt all there is to being a supervisor.
Sometimes people want to take shortcuts because
they think it will help them get the job done
faster. Sometimes theyre tired, or they're
having a bad day. There will be days when youre
tired or having a bad day, too. But you need to
be a role model for safety at all times.
36
DUTIES OF EMPLOYERS SUPERVISORS HOW TO SEND THE
RIGHT MESSAGE
  • You want to help the workers choose the safe path
    every time. You can help them by being easy to
    talk to and answering their questions. But the
    best thing you can do is to practice what you
    preach.
  • That means always complying with the OHSA and
    following the healthy and safe work practices in
    your workplace. It means explaining how to work
    safely and correcting unsafe work situations
    whenever you see them.

37
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
  • Know the Hazards in YOUR Workplace
  • One of your jobs as a supervisor is to help plan
    and organize the work. This is a big job. To do
    it well, you need to understand the work and the
    hazards associated with it. You also need to know
    how to eliminate or control those hazards and to
    make sure the health and safety program
    implemented in your workplace is effective in
    doing so.
  • At the root of every work-related death, injury
    or sickness is a hazard of some kind. Hazards can
    take many forms. Sometimes more than one hazard
    can combine to make an even bigger hazard.

38
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
  • Here are some of the most common hazards in
    Ontario workplaces
  • Repeating the same movements over and over,
    especially if you are in an awkward position or
    you use a lot of force. Think of someone who
    bends down all day, or someone who lifts heavy
    things over and over again.
  • Slipping, tripping or falling. Think of something
    as simple as spilled coffee on the floor, a
    cluttered work area or a raised platform with no
    guardrails.
  • Motorized vehicles. Think of being hit by a dump
    truck that is backing up on a construction site,
    or someone getting hit by a forklift truck in a
    warehouse or on a loading dock.
  • Using or working near machinery. Many workers
    have been killed or seriously injured by the
    equipment they were operating.
  • Workplace violence. It can happen to workers in
    many situations, such as a retail employee
    working alone at night, or a health care worker
    in a hospital or in the community.

39
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
  • Dealing with Hazards
  • RACE is a commonly used process for dealing with
    hazards. 
  • RACE stands for Recognize, Assess, Control and
    Evaluate.
  • These steps, when done in order, help the
    workplace identify and control hazards.
  • Supervisors are encouraged to communicate with
    workers, the employer, and the joint health and
    safety committee throughout this type of process.
  • RECOGNIZE where there are potential hazards in
    the workplace.
  • Here's how you do that
  • Watch the work as its being done.
  • Talk to workers about the work and the areas
    where work happens.
  • Participate in workplace inspections.
  • Look at reports and records that your workplace
    has about the work.
  • Listen to the concerns workers have about the
    work theyre doing.

40
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
  • ASSESS the hazard. You need to understand how
    likely it is that a worker will get hurt or made
    sick by the hazard.
  • To assess the hazard, you ask these questions
  • How does the hazard compare to legislation,
    standards and guidelines?
  • How can the worker get hurt or sick?
  • How likely is the hazard to affect worker health
    and safety?
  • How badly could the worker get hurt or sick
  • CONTROL the hazards by looking for ways to get
    rid of the hazard or to make the job safer
  • The safest thing to do is to remove the hazard.
  • If removing the hazard is not possible, look for
    ways to prevent workers from coming in contact
    with the hazard, such as separating the hazard
    from the worker.
  • If neither of the above solutions protects the
    worker, workers can use protective equipment,
    devices and other materials to help keep them
    safe. Its your obligation as a supervisor to
    make sure workers use this equipment where
    required by the OHSA and Regulations or by the
    employer.

41
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
  • EVALUATE the hazards by looking for ways to get
    rid of the hazard or to make the job safer
  • Talk about the work to the workers who report to
    you.
  • Watch them do their work.
  • Listen to what they say and look for ways
    to improve health and safety.

The RACE process is one good way to get a close
look at the work and the hazards associated with
it. You are always keeping your eyes and ears
open for hazards you pay attention to the way
people are doing their work and you listen to
their concerns.
If you find a hazard, you know that you need to
do something about it. You use your experience
and the information and training you got from
your employer to help you make decisions on what
to do. If you dont know how to deal with the
hazard, talk to your employer. You can also
involve the health and safety representative
or JHSC if there is one. And you can refer to
external sources such as legislation, standards,
codes or expert consultants to help you solve the
problem. If necessary, you can stop the work
until you know it's safe.
42
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
  • HANDLING PROBLEMS AS THEY ARISE
  • The RACE process is a way to help you deal with
    hazards, but it isn't everything. You also need
    to monitor the work. This means that you need to
    take steps to make sure the workers understood
    the information you gave them and are following
    the workplace safety procedures AND are using or
    wearing their protective equipment. If you see a
    worker (Or student, volunteer, visitor, etc)
    exposed to a hazard, its your job to talk to
    them about it. You have to make sure the OHSA,
    any applicable regulations and the workplace
    safety procedures are being followed, and you
    have to enforce those procedures.

43
SUPERVISORS TOOLKIT
If someone comes to you with a health and safety
concern or to report a close call, you need to
listen to them, because these are warning signs
of potentially serious problems ahead. You also
need to inform your employer of these concerns.
If you can solve a problem on your own or with
the worker, you should do that. If you need help,
you should ask your employer.
44
JOINT HEALTH SAFETY COMMITTEE
45
JOINT HEALTH SAFETY COMMITTEE
  • Required by the OHSA in workplaces with 20 of
    more workers
  • A JHSC is an advisory group of workers and
    management representatives
  • At least 50 of the members must be workers
    chosen by other workers at the workplace or by a
    union
  • JHSCs meet regularly (at least 4 times per year),
    perform workplace inspections, identify hazards,
    make recommendations to improve workplace health
    and safety, and investigate critical injuries and
    work refusals
  • A hard copy of the members is posted at the
    entrance to 350 Victoria Street (LIB Building)
  • Ryerson JHSC members, minutes and information

46
JHSC CERTIFIED MEMBER
  • What is a "certified" member of a joint health
    and safety committee?
  • A "certified" member of a joint health and safety
    committee is a member who has received special
    training in occupational health and safety and
    has been certified by the Workplace Safety and
    Insurance Board (WSIB). He or she plays an
    important role on the health and safety committee
    and in the workplace, with specific authority and
    responsibilities.

47
JHSC CERTIFIED MEMBER
WHAT RIGHTS AND DUTIES DO CERTIFIED MEMBERS
HAVE? Because certified members have special
training in workplace health and safety, they
have special responsibilities in the workplace.
Where possible, the certified member who
represents workers should conduct the monthly
workplace inspections section 9(24). He or she
should also be present, if possible, at the
investigation of a work refusal. A certified
member who receives a complaint that dangerous
circumstances exist is entitled to investigate
the complaint section 48(1). Certified members
also have the right, under certain circumstances,
to order the employer to stop work that is
dangerous to a worker. In most cases, it takes
two certified members representing both
management and the workers to direct an employer
to stop dangerous work. In some special cases, a
single certified member may have this right.
48
Applicable legislation
49
APPLICABLE LEGISLATION EHS IN AN UNIVERSITY
ENVIRONMENT
  • Some examples of Federal Provincial Municipal
    and International Legislation that applies in an
    University Environment
  • Criminal Code of Canada Environmental
    Protection Act Emergency Management Act
    Hazardous Products Act Human Pathogens and
    Toxins Act Nuclear Safety and Control Act
    Radiation Emitting Devices Act Transportation
    of Dangerous Goods Act Accessibility for
    Ontarians with Disabilities Building Code Act
    Electricity Act Fire Protection and Prevention
    Act Food Safety Quality Act Health
    Protection and Promotion Act Human Rights Code
    Occupational Health Safety Act Regulations
    Smoke Free Ontario Act Technical Standards and
    Safety Act Workplace Safety Insurance Act
    Regulations Noise By-Law Smoking By-Law
    Waste Discharge to Municipal Sewers By-Laws
    Landfill Waste Management By-Laws International
    Air Transport Association International Atomic
    Energy Agency National Institute of Health

50
APPLICABLE LEGISLATION EHS IN AN UNIVERSITY
ENVIRONMENT
  • These are just a few of the pieces of legislation
    that applies in an University setting (well over
    100 pieces of legislation applies in an
    University setting). There are also international
    and national standards and guidelines that can be
    used when there is no specific legislation for
    the activity being proposed or when there is a
    lack of guidance on HOW to do the work safely.

Ignorance of the LAW is not a valid argument if
something SERIOUS happens to you or someone you
supervise if you are unsure ASK. Better to
take the time BEFORE something happens than have
to explain why you didnt take the time AFTER.
51
ONTARIOS HS SYSTEM PARTNERS
52
MOL, WSIB and DESIGNATED ENTITIES
  • Ontario Ministry of Labour
  • Develops, communicates and enforces occupational
    health and safety requirements and employment
    standards. Develops, coordinates and implements
    strategies to prevent workplace injuries and
    illnesses and can set standards for health and
    safety training. 1-877-202-0008
  • Workers Health Safety Centre
  • An occupational health and safety training centre
    for workers, representatives and
    employers. 1-888-869-7950
  • Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers
  • Six medical clinics located across Ontario that
    provide occupational health services and
    information. 1-877-817-0336
  • Health Safety Ontario
  • Four health and safety associations that provide
    sector specific consulting, training, products
    and services. www.healthandsafetyontario.ca
  • Infrastructure Health and Safety Association 
    serves electrical, construction and
    transportation sectors. 1-800-263-5024
  • Public Services Health and Safety Association 
    serves health, education and municipal sectors.
    1-877-250-7444
  • Workplace Safety North  serves mining, pulp and
    paper and forestry sectors. 1-888-730-7821
  • Workplace Safety and Prevention Services  serves
    industrial, farming and service sectors.
    1-877-494-9777
  • Workplace Safety and Insurance Board
  • Administers Ontarios no-fault workplace
    insurance for employers and their workers.
    1-800-387-0750 www.wsib.on.ca

53
MOL, WSIB and DESIGNATED ENTITIES
  • Institute for Work Health (IWH)
  • IWH is an independent, not-for-profit research
    organization that aims to protect and improve the
    health of working people by providing useful,
    relevant research to workers, employers,
    occupational health and safety professionals,
    disability management professionals, clinicians,
    policy-makers and more.
  • Phone 416-927-2027
  • Centre of Research Expertise for the Prevention
    of Musculoskeletal Disorders (CRE-MSD)
  • CRE-MSD conducts research to improve the
    understanding and prevention of work-related
    musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).MSDs are painful
    or disabling injuries to the muscles, tendons or
    nerves in the lower back, shoulders, neck,
    elbows, wrists or hands.
  • Phone 519-888-4567 ext. 35513
    Email cre-msd_at_uwaterloo.ca
  • All of the organizations listed are part
  • of Ontarios health and safety system.
  • Another place you can go for information is the
    Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and
    Safety. They have information fact sheets on
    their website. If you are having trouble finding
    information, you can ask questions by telephone
    at 1-800-668-4284, or through their website
    at www.ccohs.ca.
  • The help you can get from these external sources
    is not just for you its for sharing with
    others in your workplace. Thats what
    the OHSA expects you to do. You have to do more
    than just know things, you have to put what you
    know into action. Prevention starts here, but it
    doesn't end here.
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