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DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

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Title: DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT


1
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND WORKFORCE
DEVELOPMENT
  • BUDGET NOTES
  • PROGRAMS DELIVERED AT COMMUNITY COLLEGE
  • Carl Perkins Professional Technical Programs
  • Adult Basic Education/Title II of Workforce
    Investment Act
  • Small Business Development Centers

April 21, 2003 Presented to Ways Means
Education Subcommittee By Cam Preus-Braly
2
Agency Reductions
3
Organizational Chart
4
Columbia 2,884 6.5
Community Colleges
Clatsop 5,894 16.3
Multnomah 73,607 11.0
Hood R. 2,373 11.6
Umatilla 7,008 10.0
Wallowa 305 4.3
Wash. 44,531 9.6
Tillamook 3,813 15.5
Sherman 137 7.4
Morrow 815 7.2
Gilliam 98 5.2
Union 582 2.4
Yamhill 6,469 7.4
Clackamas 33,438 9.5
Wasco 2,974 12.5
Polk 5,962 9.4
Marion 35,494 12.2
Wheeler 78 5.0
Baker 755 4.5
Lincoln 4,427 9.9
Jefferson 1,631 8.2
Linn 14,396 13.8
Benton 11,918 14.9
Grant 374 4.8
Crook 1,283 6.4
Lane 37,054 11.3
Deschutes 13,468 10.6
Harney 212 2.8
Malheur 3,859 12.1
Lake 639 8.6
Coos 10,655 17.0
Douglas 16,233 16.0
  • CC Students by County
  • Total Students Enrolled, 2001-02
  • of Population Enrolled

Curry 2,330 11.0
Klamath 2,836 4.4
Jackson 7,220 3.8
Josephine 5,379 3.8
5
All Students 2001-02
6
Community Colleges Served 406,434 Students in
2001-02
7
Increased Student Demand Over the Last Decade
8
Enrollment Scenarios Including Agency Request
9
Budget Numbers
10
Enrollment Scenarios
11
Tuition/Fees
  • Tuition increased 12 this year
  • rates are set by local college boards.
  • state average yearly tuition and fees for
  • a full-time in-district student 2,337
  • tuition for 2002-03 ranges from 40-55
  • per credit
  • Projected average increase next year of 10 per
    credit, for a range of 46 to 62

12
Community College Tuition
02-03 increase 12 Student share of their
education for the decade 1992 to 2002 increased
from 22 to 33
13
2002-03 Annual Tuition and Fees Cost to Students
14
Enrollment Projections
15
U.S. Department of Labor
U.S. Department of Education
WIA Title II (Adult Education and Family
Literacy) - 9.8 million
OR Dept. of Education
WIA Title IB (Adult, Youth, Dislocated Workers) -
112.3 million
Perkins Professional Technical Funds - 9.4
million
Department of Community Colleges and Workforce
Development
Oregon Community Colleges
Local Workforce Areas
Contracts for Services
Community College Support Fund - 407.7 million
State Funding (Oregon Legislature)
16
Professional Technical Programs
  • Federal Carl Perkins Professional Technical
    program
  • Builds on the efforts of states and localities to
    develop challenging academic standards
  • Promotes the development of services and
    activities that integrate academic and
    professional/technical instruction
  • Promotes the linkage between secondary and
    postsecondary education
  • Increases state and local flexibility to provide
    services and activities
  • Disseminates national research and provides
    professional development and technical assistance
    to improve vocational and technical education
    programs

17
Professional Technical Programs
  • 50-50 split of funds between secondary and
    post-secondary programs
  • Funding directly distributed to high schools and
    colleges as grant-in-aid
  • Statewide activities
  • Challenge Grants K12/CC collaborations for
    demonstration projects in Information Technology,
    Teacher and Paraprofessional Preparation,
    Engineering and Healthcare
  • Statewide Community College program initiatives
    in
  • Healthcare the Community College Healthcare
    Action Plan, preliminary funding for 2003-04
  • Teacher and Paraprofessional Training training
    in response to No Child Left Behind
    mandates/planning phase
  • Revitalization of State Youth Committee joint
    staffing by ODE/OPTE and CCWD/WIA Staff

18
Organizational Chart
19
Adult Education Family Literacy Title II of WIA
  • Provides assistance to adults -
  • Increase literacy, knowledge and skills necessary
    for employment and self-sufficiency
  • Completion of a secondary school education or
    equivalent

20
Adult Education Family Literacy Title II of WIA
  • Need for literacy services is well documented
  • Individuals without a high school credential from
    the 2000 Census
  • 223,106 Oregonians aged 25 and older, 9.9 of the
    population, without a high school credential
  • 111,705 of those have less than a 9th grade
    education
  • Numbers served by local programs in 2001-2002
    26,314.

21
Adult Education Family Literacy Title II of WIA
  • Basic skills instruction in reading, math,
    writing, speaking/listening
  • Secondary credential GED and high school
    diploma
  • Family literacy and workplace literacy
  • Instruction in reading, writing, speaking and
    listening in English (ESL)

22
Adult Education Family Literacy Title II of WIA
  • Providers include
  • Seventeen community colleges
  • Community-based coalitions
  • Department of Corrections
  • Local and county jails

23
Adult Education Family Literacy Title II of WIA
  • Total served 26,314
  •     Basic Skills 12,663
  •    Limited English speakers 11,905
  •    GED/Adult High School 1,746
  • Gender
  •    Male 14,069
  •    Female 12,245
  • Employed on entry into program
  •     9,905

24
Organizational Chart
25
Adult Education Family Literacy Title II of WIA
  • Local programs report challenges including
  • Waiting lists for entry into programs
  • Lack of resources to add services for family
    literacy and workplace literacy
  • Need for childcare and transportation support for
    learners while attending school
  • Serving learners who are balancing work, family,
    and school

26
Small Business Development Centers
  • The Oregon Small Business Development Center
    Network is a partnership that includes
  • 16 community colleges, three state universities
  • the U.S. Small Business Administration
  • the Oregon Economic and Community Development
    Department
  • private business
  • More than 10,000 businesses were assisted by the
    Oregon SBDC program in 2002.
  • Funding for the SBDC Network is included in the
    budget of the Oregon Economic and Community
    Development Department.

27
Small Business Development Centers
  • Services to Business Owners
  • Confidential Business Counseling
  • Business Training
  • Business Information and Referrals
  • International Trade Assistance
  • Major Areas of Assistance
  • Business Plan Development
  • Marketing Plan Development
  • Accounting Assistance
  • New Product or Service Development
  • Personnel Management

28
Small Business Development Centers
29
Access at risk for Oregonians
30
Increased Demand for Highly Skilled Workforce
  • Oregons future will depend on having a critical
    mass of highly skilled technology workers and
    researchers.
  • We need to immediately retrain existing workers
    for todays high demand jobs.
  • Oregon Council for Knowledge and Economic
    Development Report, 2002
  • The current supply of graduates produced by
    Oregons community colleges and universities
    falls short of the demand created by new
    positions and vacancies in these critical
    shortage fields.
  • Final Report of the Interim Task Force on Health
    Care Personnel, 2002

31
Challenges
  • Nursing and Allied Health Programs are full but
    colleges do not have funds to expand to meet
    market demand.
  • Waiting lists for ESL classes
  • Funding cuts fewer programs, classes, seats
    statewide
  • Physical plants in need of repair or expansion to
    meet the need for classroom and lab space.

32
Challenges
  • Professional Technical Programs are the training
    ground for a highly skilled workforce.
  • But in 2001-2003 the gap in PT programs grew
  • 15 AAS Programs were suspended
  • 12 Certificate Programs were suspended
  • 17 AAS Programs were deleted
  • 8 Certificate Programs were deleted

33
What are the Options?
  • More !
  • Greater reliance on grant and other funds
  • Cost savings cut staff, programs, courses
  • Tuition Strategies
  • Raising Tuition
  • Differentiated Tuition
  • Increased Oregon Opportunity Grant

34
Socio-Economic Benefits
  • Return on investment (source CC Benefits Inc.
    Study, March 2002)
  • 17 ROI in Oregons Community Colleges.
  • The state of Oregon benefits from improved
    health, reduced welfare, unemployment and crime
    saving the public 61.5 million per year.
  • Benefits of a community college education
    (Bureau of Labor Statistics publication)
  • Increase wages 100 to 400 per week
  • Decreases likelihood of unemployment by 50
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