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Scaffolding Concept Development in the Content Areas using the Inductive Model

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Scaffolding Concept Development in the Content Areas using the Inductive Model Layli Strasburg Lee High School Houston, TX – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Scaffolding Concept Development in the Content Areas using the Inductive Model


1
Scaffolding Concept Development in the Content
Areas using the Inductive Model
  • Layli Strasburg
  • Lee High School
  • Houston, TX

2
The Challenge
  • At the secondary school level, content area
    teachers are straining under the demands of
    overstuffed curricula.
  • Students arriving at the secondary level with low
    literacy abilities make the transmission of the
    content even more strenuous.
  • There is a growing demand for students to be able
    to express ideas and knowledge through effective
    expository writing in the content areas

3
  • How can content area teachers simultaneously
    build students literacy skills while providing
    them meaningful interaction with content
    knowledge?

4
Dr. Tabas Purpose of Education
  • Dr. Hilda Taba was a refugee intellectual and
    espoused a profound belief in the role of
    education as a fundamental mechanism of
    democracy. Education was the means through which
    people of varying ethnicities and religions could
    find common ground.
  • As a progressive educator, she promoted the use
    of critical thinking in the classroom to produce
    citizens who could dispel the myths of bigotry
    and support democracy in a multicultural nation.

5
Make Time for Concept Development
  • Three levels of knowledge facts, basic
    principles/ideas, concepts
  • Facts are too vast, increase at too fast a
    rate, and are prone to obsolescence.
  • Facts should be selected and organized to support
    principles, ideas, and eventually concepts

6
The Method Inductive Modeling
  • The Teacher
  • Determines categories of concepts or ideas
  • Collects factual statements that support these
    concepts
  • Provides students with a scrambled list (a.k.a.
    the data set) of the relevant statements
  • Models reading for main idea
  • Guides students through categorization
  • The Students
  • Read each statement for main idea
  • Sort similar statements into groups
  • Hypothesize categories to which the statements
    belong
  • Write a summary about each category formulating
    an overarching concept

7
A Demonstration
  • Prior to industrialization, most people lived in
    small rural villages. Individuals and families
    produced their own clothing and exchanged food
    and work animals in common marketplaces. The
    workday was long and difficult and for the most
    part, unprofitable. All products were made by
    hand and took much more time to create.
  • Life before industrialization
  • Life in rural villages

8
A Demonstration
  • Working hours in factories were long. Shifts
    lasted 12 to 16 hours. Machinery was often
    dangerous and many workers lost limbs and fingers
    due to grinding gears, exhaustion and lack of
    precautions by factory owners.
  • Factory Work
  • Dangerous Work

9
A Demonstration
  • English Parliament developed a hands off policy
    when dealing with industrialization. This
    laissez-faire policy meant factories could
    operate however they chose. By leaving control of
    the railways, farms, and factories to the owners,
    governments hoped that the great wealth generated
    would benefit all people.
  • English politics
  • Laissez-faire policy
  • Control of industry

10
Your Turn
  • Read the selected passages and determine a main
    idea for each.
  • Make notes in the margins of your handout.

11
Next Step Categorizing
  • Cut up your handout into strips.
  • Sort your statements into groups according to
    their subject matter.
  • Label each group with a possible category
  • Share and discuss with your partner
  • Share with the group

12
And then
  • Write a statement summarizing each category
  • Generate literal and interpretive questions that
    could be answered based on the information
  • Generate a graphic organizer that represent the
    relationship between the statements
  • Select a category and generate an expository
    composition based on it

13
Modifications
  • The Data Set can be modified in any number of
    ways
  • Advanced students can make their own data sets
  • Poems, excerpts from literature, instead of
    factual statements
  • Sentences instead of paragraphs
  • Words instead of sentences
  • Pictures instead of words

14
Implementation
  • Method best implemented throughout year within
    thematic units
  • Background knowledge may need to be developed
    prior to using the method
  • Start with simplified, concrete knowledge to
    introduce the method to students
  • Special populations may need more modeling and
    guidance

15
References
  • Costa, Arthur L. Loveall, Richard A. (2002).
    The Legacy of Hilda Taba. Journal of Curriculum
    and Supervision, 18, 56-62.
  • Joyce, Bruce and Weil, Marsha. (1992) Models of
    Teaching. Needham Heights, MA Allyn and Bacon.
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