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Continue to refine the Joint Venture concept as a model for collaborative conservation at ecoregional scales.

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Title: Continue to refine the Joint Venture concept as a model for collaborative conservation at ecoregional scales.


1
Our Challenge
Continue to refine the Joint Venture concept as a
model for collaborative conservation at
ecoregional scales.
2
The 1986 NAWMP New Directions
  • New standards for measuring success
  • Population response at a continental scale.
  • Landscape sustainability at ecoregional scales.

3
The 1986 NAWMP New Directions
  • New standards for measuring success
  • Iterative cycle of refining goals and objectives
  • 1994 Update
  • 1998 Update
  • 2004 Update
  • 2005 Assessment

4
The 1986 NAWMP New Directions
  • New standards for measuring success
  • Iterative cycle of refining goals and objectives
  • A new model for coordination and collaboration
    joint ventures

5
joint venture Two or more "parent" companies
agreeing to share capital, technology, human
resources, risks and rewards in the formation of
a new entity under shared control.
6
joint ventures? Guidance from the NAWMP
  • Geographically specific
  • Functionally comprehensive
  • Coordinate the planning, funding, and
    implementation of projects
  • to monitor population trends
  • to determine through research the important
    factors influencing population status and
    dynamics
  • to monitor the status and productivity

7
joint ventures? Guidance from the NAWMP
  • Geographically specific
  • Functionally comprehensive
  • Organized and guided by joint venture action
    groups
  • Guided by formal plans
  • Vehicle for translating the Plans vision into
    concrete action

8
North American Bird Conservation Initiative
Partners in Flight
North American Waterbird Plan
U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan
North American Waterfowl Management Plan
Northern Bobwhite Quail Conservation Initiative
NABCI Vision
Regionally-based
Biologically-driven
Landscape-oriented partnerships
Delivering the full spectrum of bird conservation
across the entirety of North America.
9
(No Transcript)
10
Our Challenge
Continue to refine the Joint Venture concept as a
model for collaborative conservation at
ecoregional scales.
Responsive to
  • The biological needs of the taxonomic groups
    represented by the suite of national and
    international conservation plans.
  • The concept of integrated bird conservation.
  • The goals and objectives of CWCSs and the need
    to demonstrate biological accountability.

11
Our Challenge
Continue to refine the Joint Venture concept as a
model for collaborative conservation at
ecoregional scales.
12
The LMV Joint Venture Operating Framework
Biological Foundation
Conservation Design
Conservation Delivery
13
LMVJV Biological Planning Process
Identify Species of Concern
Develop Biological Foundation
Establish Population Targets
Discern Limiting Factors
Develop Biological Models
Set Objectives to Reduce Limiting Factors
Measure Existing Conditions
Design Conservation Strategies
Apportion Habitat Objectives
Establish Programmatic Objectives
Implement Conservation Projects
Monitor Habitat Change
Monitor Effectiveness
Monitor Population Response
Evaluate Biological Assumptions
14
  • Population/Habitat Modeling
  • Landscape Characterization and Assessment
  • Conservation Design and Conservation Tracking
  • Decision-Based Population and Habitat Monitoring
  • Assumption-Driven Research

15
To the extent we have been successful in meeting
the challenge of developing a model for
collaborative conservation at ecoregional scales,
  • Internally, to the staff and leadership of our
    respective agencies and organizations.
  • Externally, to our peers within the conservation
    community at large.

16
My Bottom line
As a partnership, we should synthesize and
communicate the LMV model in a way that can
provide clarification and guidance on the LMVJV
approach to business internally within our
respective organizations and externally to the
conservation community at large.
17
Four Concepts from the Business World
That Can Strengthen Joint Ventures
  • Business Ecosystems as a means of leveraging
    assets and relationships among conservation
    partners.

18
Business Ecosystem
Iansiti, M. and R. Levien. 2004. Strategy as
Ecology. Harvard Business Review, March 2004,
pp. 1-10.
Iansiti, M. and R. Levien. 2004. The Keystone
Advantage What the New Dynamics of Business
Ecosystems Mean for Strategy, Innovation, and
Sustainability. Harvard Business School Press,
Boston. 253 pp.
Strategy is becoming, to an increasing extent,
the art of managing assets that one does not
own. p. 1
19
Business Ecosystem
  • The 21st Century business environment is a
    networked environment with businesses
    functionally allied through supply chains,
    distribution chains, manufacturing processes,
    technology development.
  • Like species in biological ecosystems, firms
    interact in complex ways, and the health and
    performance of each firm is dependent on the
    health and performance of the whole.
  • Organizational effectiveness relies increasingly
    on leveraging and managing assets external to the
    business.
  • Sustained performance requires operating
    decisions focused externally on maintaining the
    health of the firms business ecosystem.

20
Conservation Partner Ecosystem
  • The 21st Century conservation environment is a
    networked environment with organizations
    functionally allied in assessing landscapes,
    setting objectives, coordinating delivery, and
    evaluating biological outcomes.
  • Like species in biological ecosystems, firms
    interact in complex ways, and the health and
    performance of each firm is dependent on the
    health and performance of the whole.
  • Organizational effectiveness relies increasingly
    on leveraging and managing assets external to the
    business.
  • Sustained performance requires operating
    decisions focused externally on maintaining the
    health of the firms business ecosystem.

21
Conservation Partner Ecosystem
  • The 21st Century conservation environment is a
    networked environment with organizations
    functionally allied in assessing landscapes,
    setting objectives, coordinating delivery, and
    evaluating outcomes.
  • Like species in biological ecosystems,
    conservation organizations interact in complex
    ways, and the health and performance of each is
    dependent on the health and performance of the
    whole.
  • Organizational effectiveness relies increasingly
    on leveraging and managing assets external to the
    business.
  • Sustained performance requires operating
    decisions focused externally on maintaining the
    health of the firms business ecosystem.

22
Conservation Partner Ecosystem
  • The 21st Century conservation environment is a
    networked environment with organizations
    functionally allied in assessing landscapes,
    setting objectives, coordinating delivery, and
    evaluating outcomes.
  • Like species in biological ecosystems,
    conservation organizations interact in complex
    ways, and the health and performance of each is
    dependent on the health and performance of the
    whole.
  • The effectiveness of a conservation organization
    hinges increasingly on leveraging and managing
    assets external to the organization.
  • Sustained performance requires operating
    decisions focused externally on maintaining the
    health of the firms business ecosystem.

23
Conservation Partner Ecosystem
  • The 21st Century conservation environment is a
    networked environment with organizations
    functionally allied in assessing landscapes,
    setting objectives, coordinating delivery, and
    evaluating outcomes.
  • Like species in biological ecosystems,
    conservation organizations interact in complex
    ways, and the health and performance of each is
    dependent on the health and performance of the
    whole.
  • The effectiveness of a conservation organization
    hinges increasingly on leveraging and managing
    assets external to the organization.
  • The effectiveness of a conservation organization
    hinges increasingly on operating decisions
    focused on maintaining the health of its partner
    ecosystem.

24
Four Concepts from the Business World
That Can Strengthen Joint Ventures
  • Business Ecosystems as a means of leveraging
    assets and relationships among conservation
    partners.
  • The Theory of the Business as a means of
    articulating the underlying assumptions that are
    guiding the partnerships actions.

25
The Theory of the Business
These are the assumptions that shape any
organizations behavior, dictate its decisions
about what to do and not to do, and define what
the organization considers meaningful results.
  • Assumptions about the external environment within
    which the organization operates.
  • Assumptions about the specific mission of the
    organization.
  • Assumptions about the core competencies needed to
    accomplish the mission.

Drucker, P.F. 1994. The Theory of the Business
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 70 no. 5
26
The Theory of the Business
These are the assumptions that shape any
organizations behavior, dictate its decisions
about what to do and not to do, and define what
the organization considers meaningful results.
  • Every organization has one, though rarely is it
    explicitly stated.
  • Assumptions are seldom made explicit.
  • Reassessing assumptions is essential to managing
    change.

Drucker, P.F. 1994. The Theory of the Business
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 70 no. 5
27
The Theory of the Business
These are the assumptions that shape any
organizations behavior, dictate its decisions
about what to do and not to do, and define what
the organization considers meaningful results.
  • Assumptions about the external environment within
    which the organization operates.
  • Assumptions about the specific mission of the
    organization.
  • Assumptions about the core competencies needed to
    accomplish the mission.

Drucker, P.F. 1994. The Theory of the Business
Harvard Business Review, Vol. 70 no. 5
28
Key Assumptions
of the LMVJV Conservation Model
  • Translating the goals and objectives of national
    and international plans into on-the-ground
    objectives is a primary responsibility of Joint
    Ventures.
  • Characterizing, monitoring, and predicting
    habitat suitability at broad spatial scales are
    core functions of a Joint Venture.
  • Maintaining a partnership infrastructure that
    allows planning, implementation, and evaluation
    to operate iteratively is a responsibility shared
    by all partners.
  • Coordinated application of information management
    technologies is requisite to achieving biological
    outcomes at ecoregional scales.
  • An ability to coordinate and leverage
    conservation delivery is a core competence of an
    effective partnership.

29
Four Concepts from the Business World
That Can Strengthen Joint Ventures
  • Business Ecosystems as a means of leveraging
    assets and relationships among conservation
    partners.
  • The Theory of the Business as a means of
    articulating the underlying assumptions that are
    guiding the partnerships actions.
  • Core Competencies of the Corporation as a means
    of building shared capacities among partners.

30
Core Competencies
Prahalad, C.K. and G. Hamel. 1990. The Core
Competence of the Corporation Harvard Business
Review, Vol. 68(3) pp.79-93
Core competencies are specific to the
organization, not its individual business units
(programs).
Core competencies lead the organization to see
itself not as a collection of strategic business
units but as a portfolio of integrated skills,
abilities, and expertise.
Honda Corporation an ability to design and
manufacture highly efficient internal combustion
engines irrespective of size, scale, or intended
use.
31
The LMV Joint Venture Conservation Business Model
Core Functions and Services
  • Support to national/international initiatives by
    translating range-wide goals and objectives into
    ecoregional, landscape, and site-scale goals and
    objectives.
  • Iterative biological planning and landscape
    assessment that focuses conservation delivery on
    the most environmentally sensitive portions of
    the landscape.
  • Development of partnership infrastructure that
    allows the functional elements of the
    conservation enterprise to operate iteratively.
  • Coordinated application of the information
    management technologies necessary to conservation
    at ecoregional scales.
  • Coordinated and leveraged delivery of private,
    state, federal conservation programs.

32
Four Concepts from the Business World
That Can Strengthen Joint Ventures
  • Business Ecosystems as a means of leveraging
    assets and relationships among conservation
    partners.
  • The Theory of the Business as a means of
    articulating the underlying assumptions that are
    guiding the partnerships actions.
  • Core Competencies of the Corporation as a means
    of building shared capacities among partners.
  • Conservation Value Proposition as a means of
    communicating the value-added contribution of the
    partnership.

33
Value Proposition
The unique added value an organization offers its
customers through its operations. An
organizations reason for being as expressed
through the products, goods, and services it
intends to provide to its customers.
34
Our Conservation Value Proposition
  • Would be expressed as the unique added value that
    we as partners strive to create as we work
    collaboratively to effect conservation at
    ecoregional scales.
  • Would derive from the core functions and services
    we envision a Joint Venture partnership
    providing.

35
Our Challenge
Continue to refine the Joint Venture concept as a
model for collaborative conservation at
ecoregional scales.
36
Action Item?
As a partnership, we should synthesize and
communicate the LMV model in a way that can
provide clarification and guidance on the LMVJV
approach to business internally within our
respective organizations and externally to the
conservation community at large.
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