Integrating Experiment and Enthographic Analogy: A Case Study - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Integrating Experiment and Enthographic Analogy: A Case Study PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 7c0f8f-ZWQ4Z



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Integrating Experiment and Enthographic Analogy: A Case Study

Description:

Title: Integrating Experiment and Enthographic Analogy: A Case Study Author: University of Exeter Last modified by: lmhurcom Created Date: 10/6/2012 3:21:22 PM – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:43
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 16
Provided by: Universi405
Learn more at: http://openarch.eu
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Integrating Experiment and Enthographic Analogy: A Case Study


1
Integrating Experiment and Enthographic Analogy
A Case Study
Professor Alan K. Outram University of Exeter 8th
October 2012
  • WP5

2
Use of Ethnographic Analogies
  • Identifying artefact function
  • Understanding possible roles of organic material
    culture in cases without preservation
  • Understanding archaeologically invisible or
    ambiguous activity (both function and meaning)

3
Ethnoarchaeology
  • Archaeologists carrying out the ethnographies
    rather than anthropologists, because they have
    different questions in mind and need details on
    different processes particularly taphonomic
    questions and middle range theory.
  • Binford particularly good example (e.g. Nunamuit
    Ethnoarchaeology 1978)

4
Degrees of Correspondence
  • Analogues are not proof, and never can be
  • Analogies have more or less strength, depending
    upon the appropriateness of the context
  • How many factors correspond in the analogy
  • Are the corresponding factors pertinent or trivial

5
Problems with Ethnographic Analogy
  • Limited to the known
  • Not all things that happened in the past will
    have a known ethnographic analogue
  • Analogy may expand our modern, Western horizons,
    but we are still limited by what is recorded in
    the know world
  • Our analogues are limited to certain environments
  • Problems of observation with interference

6
Conclusion
  • Analogy is a useful tool to provide possible
    answers, that otherwise may not have occurred to
    one.
  • They do not prove anything.
  • There are good and bad analogies.
  • Be careful of context.
  • Support with other investigations, e.g.
    experiments.

7
Experiment and Experience
  • If there is not a hypothesis being tested then it
    is not an experiment!
  • Actualistic experience is also important
  • Just to understand processes we are not familiar
    with, so that we can speak with authority
  • As pre-experiments or pilot work

8
Case Study Bone Marrow and Grease Exploitation
  • Ethnographic sources show that fat is of huge
    value to many subsistence economies and that the
    extraction of marrow and the fragmentation and
    rendering of bones is commonplace.
  • There is often much bone fragmentation in
    archaeological sites, sometimes attributed to
    such practices, but without clear corroborating
    evidence.

9
Experiment
10
(No Transcript)
11
(No Transcript)
12
Shaft Splinters
13
Large Pieces
14
Small Cancellous Fragments
15
  • My approach was informed by
  • Readings of the ethnographic and
    ethnoarchaeological record
  • Experience of bone fracture and grease extraction
  • An experimentally tested method of classifying
    bone fractures
  • The creation of general model of fracture
    patterns relating to grease exploitation, based
    upon experience, experiment, ethnography and
    ethnoarchaeology, which I could compare to the
    actual archaeological record.
About PowerShow.com