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Office of Learning and Teaching

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Title: Office of Learning and Teaching


1

Designing a curriculum for the future Secondary
Schools
  • Office of Learning and Teaching

2
Student Learning Whole School Self Assessment
Tool
  • Learner at the centre
  • Leadership
  • Integration of student learning initiatives
  • Organisational structures and learning
    environment
  • Performance and development culture

3
Student Learning Whole School Self Assessment
Tool
4
Questions for reflection
  • Whole school level
  • Individually, rate your current situation against
    each of the five areas.
  • Whats your evidence for your placement?
  • Compare your ratings within your team.
  • Finalise your school rating.
  • Groups within your school
  • Would you give the same rating to each of the
    groups within your school? Why/why not?
  • What can you learn from those groups that
    have/havent made progress?

5
  • Why bother?
  • Our curriculum challenges

6

The economic challenge is to develop in young
people the skills, knowledge and personal
qualities they need for a world where work is
undergoing rapid and long- term change The
technological challenge is to enable young people
to make their way with confidence in a world that
is being shaped by technologies which are
evolving more quickly than at any time in
history.

7
The social challenge is to provide forms of
education that enable young people to engage
positively and confidently with far-reaching
processes of social and cultural change. The
personal challenge is to develop the unique
capacities of all young people, and to provide a
basis on which they can build lives that are
purposeful and fulfilling. Creative and Cultural
Education- All Our Futures Summary, 2000
Prepare our students for high levels of
challenge, complexity and individual
responsibility
8
Two types of knowledge
  • FRAGILE KNOWLEDGE
  • can be
  • Missing (exposed to, but cant remember)
  • Inert (its there but you cant do anything with
    it)
  • Naïve (simplistic, stereotypical or wrong)
  • Ritualistic (pattern useful for school task,
    nothing more)
  • GENERATIVE KNOWLEDGE
  • focuses on
  • Retention of knowledge
  • AND
  • Understanding of knowledge
  • AND
  • Active use of knowledge.
  • (David Perkins)

requires GOOD THINKING
9
A good performer in Math had this to say about
her strategy
  • I know what to do by looking at the examples.
    If there are only two numbers I subtract. If
    there are lots of numbers I add. If there are
    just two numbers and one is smaller than the
    other it is a hard problem. I divide to see if it
    comes out even and if it doesnt I multiply.
  • Smart Schools David Perkins (1992) p.25

10
  • Desforges and Cockburn (1987) reported on
    research from UK - They noted that students used
    considerable ingenuity to avoid thinking about
    classroom tasks wherever possible. Students were
    predominantly task focused, and were more
    interested in completing a task rather than
    comprehending it.
  • Is this true for your students?
  • If yes, where did they get this view?

11
What do your students value?
  • What are your students perceptions of
  • the role of the teacher?
  • the role of the student?
  • what is effective learning?
  • They work to pass and not to know, alas they pass
    and do not know! Bertrand Russell

12
MY PERCEPTIONS OF MYSELF AS A LEARNER
Amanda McGraw
13
Building learning capacity
  • What is it?
  • learning skills?
  • learning dispositions?
  • Ready, willing and able

14
Positive learning dispositions
Resilient Resourceful Reflective Reciprocal
Curious Questioning Clear thinking Collaborative
Adventurous Open-minded Thoughtful Independent
Determined Playful Self-knowing Open to feedback
Flexible Imaginative Methodical Attentive
Observant Integrating Opportunisitic Empathic
Focused Intuitive Self-evaluative Imitative
Guy Claxton, 2006
15
Building on what students know and are able to do
(Vygotsky)
16
  • Instruction is powerful only when it is
    sufficiently precise and focused to build
    directly on what students already know and to
    take them to the next level. While a teacher does
    and must do many things, the most critical is
    designing and organising instruction so that it
    is focused.
  • Without focus, instruction is inefficient and
    students spend too much time on completing
    activities that are too easy and do not involve
    new learning or too little time on tasks that are
    too difficult and involve too much new learning
    or relearning.
  • Breakthrough Fullan,Hill Crevola (2006)

17
Student engagement/disengagement
  • What is the current level of student engagement
    in Years 7-10?
  • Does it vary from year level to year level?
  • Is it an issue for all students, for some
    students?
  • What do you currently do to address engagement?
  • Should engagement be a prerequisite or an outcome?

18
Victorian Essential Learning Standards
  • Changing world
  • Generative knowledge/Deep understanding
  • Building learning capacity
  • skills and dispositions
  • Building on what students
  • know and are able to do
  • Student engagement
  • Can the Victorian Essential Learning Standards
  • assist us to address some of these challenges?


19
Victorian Essential Learning Standards
Three core, interrelated strands
Physical, Personal and Social Learning Discipline
-based Learning Interdisciplinary Learning
20
Dimensions in all domains are based on an
underlying continuum of learning. Standards
define what students should know and be able to
do at different levels. Progression points
provide examples of what typical progress towards
the standard may look like.
Level 6
Level 5
Level 4
Level 3
Level 2
Level 1
21
The learner at the centre
22
  • Requires whole school curriculum planning
  • and attention to the learning culture of the
    school.

23
A curriculum for the future .
  • Which direction?
  • Where are we now?
  • What are the issues, dilemmas and challenges we
    face?
  • Where do we want to be?

24
  • There is no such thing as best practice or even
    next practice in abstract. You cannot say
    what is good teaching, good school organisation,
    good leadership, (or even good curriculum?) until
    you have specified what it is you want youngsters
    to have gained, in the light of the particular
    world they are being readied for.
  • Guy Claxton 2006

25
OUR EDUCATIVE PURPOSE
What is powerful to learn?
What is powerful learning and what promotes it?
Who do we report to?
LEARNER
Victorian Essential Learning Standards
Principles of Learning and Teaching
Students Parents Colleagues School System
How do we know it has been learnt?
Assessment Advice
26
Curriculum Planning Modules
Module 1 - Whole school curriculum planning to
suit our students Module 2 - Planning programs
for cohorts of students
27
Module 1 Whole school curriculum planning to suit
our students
  • Activity 1.1 Characteristics of effective
    whole school curriculum planning
  • Activity 1.2 School context
  • Activity 1.3 Victorian Essential Learning
    Standards
  • Activity 1.4 Drivers for student learning
  • Activity 1.5 Curriculum design
  • Activity 1.6 Learning, teaching and
    assessment

28
Characteristics of effective whole school
curriculum planning
  • Use template 1.1B in your school team to audit
    your current practices.

29
Module 1 Whole school curriculum planning to suit
our students
  • Activity 1.1 Characteristics of effective
    whole school curriculum planning
  • Activity 1.2 School context
  • Activity 1.3 Victorian Essential Learning
    Standards
  • Activity 1.4 Drivers for student learning
  • Activity 1.5 Curriculum design
  • Activity 1.6 Learning, teaching and
    assessment

30
SCHOOL CONTEXTWhere are we at with student
learning?
Strengths Areas for improvement
Learning Outcomes
Engagement and well being
Transitions and pathways
31
Equity funding, ESL funding MIPS funding LSF
funding Other
32
School Context
  • What are our goals and targets?
  • What are our key improvement strategies?

33
Module 1 Whole school curriculum planning to suit
our students
  • Activity 1.1 Characteristics of effective
    whole school curriculum planning
  • Activity 1.2 School context
  • Activity 1.3 Victorian Essential Learning
    Standards
  • Activity 1.4 Drivers for student learning
  • Activity 1.5 Curriculum design
  • Activity 1.6 Learning, teaching and
    assessment

34
Victorian Essential Learning Standards
  • Everyone (leadership team and teachers) must be
    familiar with
  • characteristics of learners (adolescents)
  • domains
  • dimensions
  • purpose of each domain dimension
  • standards
  • learning focus statements

35
Module 1 Whole school curriculum planning to suit
our students
  • Activity 1.1 Characteristics of effective
    whole school curriculum planning
  • Activity 1.2 School context
  • Activity 1.3 Victorian Essential Learning
    Standards
  • Activity 1.4 Drivers for student learning
  • Activity 1.5 Curriculum design
  • Activity 1.6 Learning, teaching and
    assessment

36
Curriculum drivers
  • Curriculum drivers
  • are a way of structuring learning to connect
    domains and dimensions in the Victorian Essential
    Learning Standards
  • reflect our students learning needs and provide
    a structure for them to achieve the Standards

37
Drivers for student learning
  • Curriculum drivers may reflect
  • what we want our school to stand for
  • the diverse needs, backgrounds, perspectives,
    interests, achievements and ways of learning of
    our students
  • the big ideas that we want our students to
    engage with deeply
  • the future learning needs of our students
  • particular domains

38
Drivers for student learning some examples
  • Environmental sustainability
  • Studies of Asia
  • Globalisation
  • Multiculturalism
  • Healthy school
  • Civics and citizenship leadership
  • The Arts

39
Humanities some essential questions
  • Why do people seek to discover what is unknown?
  • How does learning about other cultures help us
    understand ourselves?
  • What does it mean to come of age and how does
    it differ across culture, time and gender?
  • Can we all be individuals as equal parts of a
    whole?
  • What keeps people of different cultures from
    living/working successfully together?
  • How does reflection on your work and thinking
    help you understand?
  • How do we find out the truth about things that
    happened long ago and far away? How do you see
    through bias?
  • (from Ron Ritchhart Intellectual Character)

40
English some essential questions
  • From English KLA GWSC
  • How does studying our texts inform us about the
    world we live in?
  • How does the study of literature (our texts)
    deepen our understanding of the human condition?
  • How does reflecting on my English skills in
    journals and reflective pieces improve my ability
    to communicate?
  • How does being able to use the conventions of
    English improve our ability to communicate?
  • How does the use of diverse spoken language
    skills aid in communicating with an audience?

41
English some essential questions, cont
  • How does knowing how to create a dynamic
    interaction of various spoken language skills
    improve our ability to engage an audience?
  • How does writing about my experiences differ from
    other kinds of writing?
  • How should imagination be used in developing
    skills in the English language?
  • How does studying an issue develop our ability to
    think using the English language?

42
Module 1 Whole school curriculum planning to suit
our students
  • Activity 1.1 Characteristics of effective
    whole school curriculum planning
  • Activity 1.2 School context
  • Activity 1.3 Victorian Essential Learning
    Standards
  • Activity 1.4 Drivers for student learning
  • Activity 1.5 Curriculum design
  • Activity 1.6 Learning, teaching and
    assessment

43
Possible design options
  • Incorporate the interdisciplinary and physical,
    personal and social strands of the Standards into
    existing discipline-based subjects and broaden
    their focus in this way.
  • Integrated approach where one or more disciplines
    and other relevant domains are combined and
    addressed through key questions or themes.
  • Combine all three strands in the context of
    extended projects that students are to complete.
  • Mix of integrated and domain specific subjects
  • Different approaches at different year levels
  • A mix of approaches at each year level
  • PLUS others

44
What might a future curriculum look like?
  • Learning would be structured mainly through
    projects. Some projects would be individual,
    while many would be group-based.
  • Problems and goals would not be completely
    predefined by the curriculum. Students would
    repeatedly practise identifying and solving
    problems, rather than having them placed before
    them.
  • Learning would take place in a range of contexts
    and use a range of methods. Projects would not
    all be research-based or within a traditional
    classroom environment. Students would be
    involved in doing as much as in thinking or
    knowing.

45
  • Alongside more traditional, teacher-centred
    assessment, students work would be evaluated by
    field experts, peers, parents and so on. It
    would be evaluated for different kinds of skills
    and knowledge - interpersonal, thinking
    strategies, self-organisation, depth of
    understanding and so on.
  • Thinking and self assessment would be embedded
    across the curriculum. Students would focus
    particularly on learning to make connections
    between different contexts - the transfer and
    application of knowledge across different
    domains.
  • Skills would be revisited and practised over
    time, so that knowledge gained earlier in an
    educational career could be applied creatively to
    new problems.

46
  • Students would gain depth of understanding in a
    number of disciplines, or domains of knowledge,
    including traditional academic subjects. They
    would also learn explicitly how to combine
    interdisciplinary knowledge in completing a
    project goal.
  • The Creative Age- Knowledge and Skills for the
    New Economy. DEMOS 1999.

47
Curriculum Models
  • Look at different curriculum design models from
    various schools.
  • What are their strengths?
  • What are their limitations?

Community views? Implementation issues?
48
Reporting (as distinct from teaching)
  • Who will report to parents on each of the
    domains?
  • Consider
  • elements of domains and dimensions covered in
    each subject/program
  • identification of teachers who will report on
    particular domains and students
  • coordination of information for reporting
    purposes if more than one teacher has assessment
    information on a domain/s for particular students

49
Transition Model for reporting against the
Standards 2007 to 2008
2007 2008
Minimum expectations To report against the Standards in ? English ? Mathematics ? Health Physical Education ? Personal Learning ? Civics Citizenship ? The Humanities (Economics, Geography, History) ? Communication ? ICT ? Other subjects to be reported against the CSF Minimum expectations To report against the Standards in ? English ? Mathematics ? Health Physical Education ? Personal Learning ? Civics Citizenship ? The Humanities (Economics, Geography, History) ? Communication ? ICT ? Interpersonal Development ? The Arts ? Languages Other Than English ? Science ? Design, Creativity Technology ? Thinking Processes
50
Module 1 Whole school curriculum planning to suit
our students
  • Activity 1.1 Characteristics of effective
    whole school curriculum planning
  • Activity 1.2 School context
  • Activity 1.3 Victorian Essential Learning
    Standards
  • Activity 1.4 Drivers for student learning
  • Activity 1.5 Curriculum design
  • Activity 1.6 Learning, teaching and
    assessment

51
The learner at the centre
52
What promotes powerful learning?
  • Principles of Learning and Teaching P-12
  • The learning environment is supportive and
    productive
  • The learning environment promotes independence,
    interdependence and self-motivation
  • Students needs, backgrounds, perspectives and
    interests are reflected in the learning program
  • Students are challenged and supported to develop
    deep levels of thinking and application
  • Assessment practices are an integral part of
    teaching and learning
  • 6. Learning connects strongly with communities
    and practice beyond the classroom

53
How do we know if it has been learnt?
  • Identifying purpose of assessment is a key
    consideration for curriculum planning
  • Assessment for learning occurs when teachers
    use their inferences about student learning to
    inform their teaching (formative)
  • Assessment as learning - occurs when students
    reflect on and monitor their progress to inform
    their future learning goals (formative)
  • Assessment of learning occurs when teachers use
    evidence of student learning to make judgments
    about student achievement against goals and
    standards (summative)

54
Implementation issues
55
Key questions to be explored
  • For next year?
  • What is the most appropriate curriculum design
    based on the learning needs of our students and
    staff knowledge and expertise?
  • Will the same curriculum design be appropriate
    for all cohorts of students?
  • How will we arrange students, staff and resources
    to best implement our curriculum design?
  • In two years? In five years?

56
Evolution or revolution?
  • Steady as she goes with as little tinkering as
    possible
  • Continue with process of curriculum change we
    have already begun and incorporate changes as
    needed
  • Use this as a catalyst to reconceptualise our
    curriculum
  • a big bang or evolutionary change?

57
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58
Possible questions for reflection
  • What are the existing structures in our school
    that may be preventing us from moving forward?
  • What is our plan for the next few years?
  • Whats working for us? Whats working against us?
  • What do we need to do when we get back to school?
  • How do we build this into our Strategic Plan and
    Annual Implementation Plan?

59
Student Learning Whole School Self Assessment Tool
60
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