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Today

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Today s Agenda Any Announcements? Any Questions? Let's Review our Bellwork.... Now... Let s Begin Today s Lesson .. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Today


1
Todays Agenda
  • Any Announcements?
  • Any Questions?
  • Let's Review our Bellwork....
  • Now...
  • Lets Begin Todays Lesson..

2
Today's State Standards
  • Standard 4.0 Governance and Civics
  • 4.6 understand the concept of federalism.
  • Standard 5.0 History
  • 5.4 understand the United States Constitution as
    a "living document" in both principle and
    practice.

3
Our objectives today
  • 1. Outline the important elements of the
    Constitution.
  • 2. List the six basic principles of the
    Constitution.
  • 3. Identify the four different ways by which the
    Constitution may be formally changed.
  • 4. Outline the 27 amendments that have been added
    to the Constitution.
  • 5. Define Federalism and explain why the Framers
    chose this system of government.
  • 6. Identify powers delegated to and denied the
    National Government, and the powers reserved and
    denied to the States.
  • 7. Understand that the National Government holds
    exclusive powers, it also holds concurrent powers
    with the states.

4
Our Goal Today
  • The Constitution is a brief, straightforward
    document that has guided American government for
    over 200 years. Its authors wrote the
    Constitution based on the principles that
    political power resides with the people, and that
    the National Government should be limited and
    divided into three branches to limit the power of
    any of of those three branches.

5
Objective 1 - Outline the important elements of
the Constitution.
  • Preamble States the Purpose of the Constitution
  • Article I Legislative Branch
  • Article II Executive Branch
  • Article III Judicial Branch
  • Article IV Relations among the States
  • Article V Amending the Constitution
  • Article VI National debts, supremacy of
    national law, and the oaths of office
  • Article VII Ratifying the Constitution

6
Objective 2 - List the six basic principles of
the Constitution
  • 1) Popular Sovereignty - We, the People of the
    United States.... - draw the nation's power FROM
    the people.
  • 2) Limited Government Government MUST obey the
    law Constitutionalism
  • 3) Separation of Powers Legislative, Executive
    and Judicial Branches
  • 4) Checks and Balances Each branch has
    oversight over the other two and each branch may
    be overseen by the other two.
  • 5) Judicial Review Is it Constitutional or
    Unconstitutional?
  • 6) Federalism Division of power between a
    central government and several regional
    governments.

7
Objective 3 - Identify the four different ways
by which the Constitution may be formally changed.
8
Objective 4 - Outline the 27 amendments that
have been added to the Constitution.
9
27th Amendment
  • The Twenty-seventh Amendment to the U.S.
    Constitution reads
  • No law, varying the compensation for the
    services of Senators and Representatives, shall
    take effect, until an election of Representatives
    shall have intervened.

10
It Took A While to Pass!
  • The long history of the Twenty-seventh Amendment
    is curious and unprecedented. The amendment was
    first drafted by James Madison in 1789 and
    proposed by the First Congress in 1789 as part of
    the original Bill of Rights. The proposed
    amendment did not fare well, as only six states
    ratified it during the period in which the first
    ten amendments were ratified by the requisite
    three-fourths of the states. The amendment was
    largely neglected for the next two centuries
    Ohio was the only state to approve the amendment
    in that period, ratifying it in 1873.

11
One Man Can Make A Difference!
  • In 1982 Gregory Watson, a twenty-year-old student
    at the University of Texas, wrote a term paper
    arguing for ratification of the amendment. Watson
    received a 'C' grade for the paper and then
    embarked on a one-man campaign for the
    amendment's ratification. From his home in
    Austin, Texas, Watson wrote letters to state
    legislators across the country on an electric
    typewriter.

12
It Finally Passed!
  • During the 1980s, as state legislatures passed
    pay raises, public debate over the raises reached
    a fever pitch and state legislatures began to
    pass the measure, mostly as a symbolic gesture to
    appease voters. Few observers believed that the
    amendment would ever be ratified by the required
    thirty-eight states, but the tally of ratifying
    states began to mount. On May 7, 1992, Michigan
    became the thirty-eighth state to ratify the
    amendment, causing it to become part of the U.S.
    Constitution.

13
Objectives 5, 6 and 7
  • 5. Define Federalism and explain why the Framers
    chose this system of government.
  • 6. Identify powers delegated to and denied the
    National Government, and the powers reserved and
    denied to the States.
  • 7. Understand that the National Government holds
    exclusive powers, it also holds concurrent powers
    with the states.

14
Federalism Democracy "The federal and State
governments are in fact but different agents and
trustees of the people, constituted with
different powers, and designed for different
purposes." James Madison The Federalist, No.46
15
What is Federalism?
  • Defining federalism
  • Federalism is a system of shared power between
    two or more governments with authority over the
    same people and geographical area.

16
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17
Federalism Terms
  • Enumerated Powers - these are powers that belong
    to the national government and are set out in
    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution (such as
    coining money and conducting foreign relations)
  • Necessary and proper clause - this gives Congress
    the power to create legislation that is necessary
    and proper for it to carry out its enumerated
    powers

18
More Terms
  • Full Faith and Credit Clause Judicial Decree
    all contracts made in one state are binding in
    all others.
  • Dual Federalism - The belief that having separate
    but equal powerful levels of government. "Layer
    Cake"

19
We Didn't Want to be England
  • Unitary System - A form of government where all
    local and/or regional governments draw all of
    their authorities from a centered and strong
    national government, Great Britain was a unitary
    government, and the newly free Americans wanted
    to move away from this system.

20
Who is more powerful?
  • Supremacy clause - National law is supreme to all
    other laws passed by the state.
  • Concurrent powers - these are the powers of
    government that are overlapped and shared by the
    national and state governments. For instance,
    both states and the federal government have the
    power to tax.

21
10th Amendment of the Bill of Rights
  • Tenth amendment - "Powers not delegated to the
    U.S Government by the Constitution nor prohibited
    by it to the states, Are reserved to the states
    respectively, or to the people."

22
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23
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24
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25
Levels of Government
26
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27
Some laws that the Federal Government Force on
the States
  • Federal Highway Funds tied to
  • Speed Limit. DUI Level. Drinking Age. Seat Belt
    Laws. HOV Lanes. Future Distracted Driver Laws.
  • Federal Education Funds tied to
  • NCLB. Common Core. Race to the Top.

28
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29
Question Time -)
  • List two examples of checks and balances in our
    Federal Governments
  • Describe three freedoms protected by the Bill of
    Rights
  • Identify an issue you feel is better handled at
    the local level. Why?
  • Identify and issue you feel is better handled at
    the national level. Why?

30
Today's State Standards
  • Standard 4.0 Governance and Civics
  • 4.6 understand the concept of federalism.
  • Standard 5.0 History
  • 5.4 understand the United States Constitution as
    a "living document" in both principle and
    practice.

31
Our objectives today
  • 1. Outline the important elements of the
    Constitution.
  • 2. List the six basic principles of the
    Constitution
  • 3. Identify the four different ways by which the
    Constitution may be formally changed.
  • 4. Outline the 27 amendments that have been added
    to the Constitution.
  • 5. Define Federalism and explain why the Framers
    chose this system of government.
  • 6. Identify powers delegated to and denied the
    National Government, and the powers reserved and
    denired to the States.
  • 7. Understand that the National Government holds
    exclusive powers, it also holds concurrent powers
    with the states.

32
Our Goal Today
  • The Constitution is a brief, straightforward
    document that has guided American government for
    over 200 years. Its authors wrote the
    Constitution based on the principles that
    political power resides with the people, and that
    the National Government should be limited and
    divided into three branches to limit the power of
    any of of those three branches.
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