Experimental Research Methods in Language Learning - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Experimental Research Methods in Language Learning PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 7b5359-Yzk4Y



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Experimental Research Methods in Language Learning

Description:

Experimental Research Methods in Language Learning Chapter 16 Experimental Research Proposals Leading Questions What is a research proposal? What do you think should ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:34
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 23
Provided by: Aek8
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Experimental Research Methods in Language Learning


1
Experimental Research Methods in Language Learning
  • Chapter 16
  • Experimental Research Proposals

2
Leading Questions
  • What is a research proposal?
  • What do you think should be included in a
    research proposal?
  • Do you think it is important to develop a
    research proposal prior to an experimental study?
    Why or why not?

3
What is a Research Proposal?
  • A research proposal is a carefully-crafted,
    written document that describes what the proposed
    research is trying to achieve, how it will go
    about achieving the aim, what it will add to
    existing knowledge, and why it will be worthwhile
    conducting.
  • According to Paltridge and Starfield (2007), a
    good research proposal should be original,
    significant to advance knowledge, feasible and
    manageable by the researcher within a given
    timeframe and resources, and of interest to
    people in the field of research.

4
The Structure of a Research Proposal
5
The Structure of a Research Proposal
  • Of course, components of a research proposal can
    vary, depending on a specified length or focused
    aspects to be addressed.
  • The proposal committee usually makes a decision
    on
  • (a) a review of the relevant literature
  • (b) a proposed research methodology.

6
Title of a Proposed Study
  • The title of your proposed study tells the reader
    about the topic of your research.
  • It should not be too long because it can confuse
    the reader. Try to keep your title down to 15
    words if you could.
  • It should contain what will be investigated and
    how it will be investigated.
  • The context of the proposed study may be
    indicated.
  • Experimental study may have a title which
    includes phrases such as the effects of, the
    effectiveness of, and the roles of, and the
    comparison of.

7
Summary of the Proposed Study
  • Give an overview of your proposal
  • Present key research constructs, research
    problem, the purpose of the study, research
    method and the significance of the proposed
    study.
  • It is similar to an abstract of a research
    article, but it does not have actual data
    analysis, findings, and discussion.

8
Introduction
  • Convince the reader to see the importance of a
    proposed topic, and the problem being chosen to
    investigate
  • Start your introduction broadly enough to cover
    the area of your research and narrow it down to
    your research problem soon after
  • State the research problem explicitly and clearly

9
Research Problem
  • A research problem can be about the lack of
    understanding of the effects of the independent
    variable on the dependent variable of interest.
  • A limited body of knowledge or conflicts in
    previous research findings can be considered a
    research problem.

10
Aim(s) of the Proposed Study
  • Experimental researchers often use infinite verbs
    such as
  • to investigate, examine, evaluate, and compare to
    indicate the aim(s) of their study.

11
Definitions of Key Terms
  • This section may or may not be required.
  • Theoretical or specific terms are often explained
    in the literature review.
  • It prepares the reader for what they will read in
    the literature.
  • Present only important theoretical constructs or
    methodological terms that will be used in the
    proposal.

12
Review of the Relevant Literature
  • A literature review has three main functions
    (Wolery and Lane 2010).
  • It articulates what is known and not known about
    your research topic.
  • It builds a foundation and rationale for your
    proposed study.
  • It identifies successful designs, instruments or
    measures, and data analysis methods used by other
    previous researchers that can be applied in
    future research.

13
Review of the Relevant Literature
  • A review of the literature should provide some
    connectedness between the theoretical framework,
    previous relevant research, the proposed research
    problem and aims, and the proposed research
    methodology.
  • See, for example, Creswell (2014), Johnson and
    Christensen (2008), and Paltridge and Starfields
    (2007).

14
Implications of the Literature on the Proposed
Study
  • This section may be at the end of the review of
    the literature.
  • But it is clearer to present this on its own, so
    your identification of the research gap or
    problem can be seen more explicitly.
  • Make sure to consider both theoretical
    implications and methodological implications if
    possible.

15
Research Questions or Hypotheses
  • Research questions are used to help you focus on
    your research problem and proposed aim.
  • Experimental research questions should include
    variables such as participants, key independent
    variable(s), and dependent variable(s)
  • For example What are the effects of explicit
    instruction on the acquisition of generic and
    non-generic article usages in L2 English, as
    measured by (a) tests of implicit knowledge, and
    (b) tests of explicit knowledge? (Akakura 2012,
    p.16)

16
Proposed Research Methodology
  • Research methodology refers to the framework
    which your proposed study will be based on (e.g.
    experimental research framework, mixed methods
    design)
  • Proposed research method is related to your
    proposed research instruments, materials and data
    collection procedures

17
Proposed research method
  • Proposed Setting and Prospective Participants
  • Experimental Conditions
  • Research Instruments
  • Data Collection Procedures
  • Ethical Considerations
  • Data Analysis

18
Significance of the Proposed Study
  • It is concerned with how your proposed
    methodology and method can successfully address
    your research problems, answer your research
    questions, and shed light on the topic being
    investigated.
  • Theoretical significance (i.e., in what way your
    study may advance the relevant theory or improve
    existing knowledge)
  • Methodological significance (i.e., in what way
    your study may advance the research methodology
    in this area of research)
  • Pedagogical significance (i.e., in what way your
    study may advance teaching practice).

19
Anticipated Limitations of the Proposed Study
  • Limitations are related to claims about the
    research validity.
  • Potential threats in your study that do not allow
    you to draw firm conclusions
  • Sometimes, authors include delimitations in
    this section. Delimitations are related to the
    scope of the proposed study, so the study is more
    feasible. But of course, when an area/aspect is
    delimited, we will not gain a more complete
    picture from our research, thereby a limitation.

20
Proposed Timeline of Completion
  • Steps required to complete your proposed study
    and an estimate of the time that will be needed
    to complete each step
  • Assign a date of completion for each stage
  • Required Resources and Budget
  • State what resources and budget are required for
    your proposed study.

21
References
  • References you have cited in your proposal
  • Check if there is a requested reference style and
    follow it strictly.
  • Appendices (if any)
  • More or less optional.
  • Any additional documents (e.g., proposed research
    instruments, and treatment procedures) can be
    included here.

22
Discussion
  • What are research topics you would like to
    investigate using an experimental research
    designs?
  • Paltridge and Starfield (2007) point out that a
    good research proposal should be original,
    significant to advance knowledge, feasible and
    manageable by the researcher within a given
    timeframe and resources, and of interest to
    people in the field of research. What are these
    characteristics?
About PowerShow.com