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Title: NRCan


1
NRCans Clean Energy Thematic ReportOctober
2010
Strategic Evaluation DivisionPlanning,
Performance Management Reporting BranchScience
and Policy Integration Sector
2
Outline
1. Purpose 2. Background3. Approach 4.
Findings
3
Purpose
  • This deck is a roll-up of evaluation findings of
    six NRCan Clean Energy programs covered under
    four evaluation reports.
  • The reader is encouraged to refer to the four
    evaluation reports for more complete details on
    each of the programs.

4
Background
  • Clean Air Agenda (CAA)
  • In 2006, the Government committed to taking
    measures to address environmental issues,
    including reducing air pollution and greenhouse
    gas (GHG) emissions.
  • In response to this commitment, a total of 2.2
    billion was approved for the CAA comprised of
  • the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda (CARA), a
    regulatory approach to reducing air pollutants
    and GHG emissions and
  • programs designed to promote reductions in GHG
    emissions and air pollutants and to address
    climate change.
  • The CAA is a horizontal initiative with eight
    themes and 43 programs.

5
Background
  • Seven Clean Energy Theme (CET) programs
  • The Clean Energy Theme is comprised of seven
    programs delivered by NRCan and Indian Northern
    Affairs Canada (INAC)
  • ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses To encourage
    the construction of energy efficient new homes
    and buildings, and retrofits (e.g. training,
    labelling, and building code work).
  • ecoENERGY Retrofit
  • Homes To encourage energy efficient retrofits in
    the residential sector by providing grants to
    owners of low-rise residential properties.
  • Small and medium-sized organizations (SMO) To
    encourage energy efficient retrofits in SMOs
    within the industrial and commercial/institutional
    sectors through contributions.
  • ecoENERGY for Industry To improve the energy
    intensity and reduce energy-related GHGs and CACs
    by collaborating with industry on benchmarking,
    technical studies, and training.
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Power To help position
    low-impact renewable energy technologies to make
    an increased contribution to Canadas energy
    supply by providing long-term production
    incentives for producers of renewable power.
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat To develop
    renewable thermal energy industry capacity, and
    to increase the use of renewable thermal units
    primarily by providing a capital incentive for
    the installation of such units.
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative (ecoETI)
    Provided support to two NRCan ST programs (Clean
    Electric Power Generation and Oil Gas) to find
    long-term solutions to reducing and eliminating
    air pollutants from the production and use of
    energy.
  • ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern
    Communities To reduce or displace natural gas,
    coal and diesel generation of electricity thereby
    reducing GHG emissions and CACs resulting in
    cleaner air, as well as to produce social, other
    environmental and economic benefits for
    communities.

6
Background
Clean Energy Theme expenditures by program from
2007-08 to 2009-10
7
Background
Clean Energy Theme program expenditures were 700
Million from 2007-08 to 2009-10 (81 GsCs and
19 OM)
Clean Energy Theme Programs Expenditures From 2007-08 to 2009-10 (M) Clean Energy Theme Programs Expenditures From 2007-08 to 2009-10 (M) Clean Energy Theme Programs Expenditures From 2007-08 to 2009-10 (M) Clean Energy Theme Programs Expenditures From 2007-08 to 2009-10 (M) Clean Energy Theme Programs Expenditures From 2007-08 to 2009-10 (M)
Expenditures 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Total
Operating 29.6 47.4 57.5 134.6
Grants Contributions 46.7 150.1 371.0 567.9
Total 76.3 197.5 428.5 702.5
8
Clean Energy Thematic Evaluation Data Sources
Thematic Evaluation Approach
  • Four evaluations provide findings for the six
    NRCan programs
  • Evaluation findings for INACs ecoENERGY for
    Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program are
    not available at this time. Consequently, this
    program is not covered in this report.

9
Thematic Evaluation Approach
  • Clean Energy Theme evaluation questions
  • The summary information presented in the
    following pages has been organized around the
    evaluation questions below and the relevant
    programs. The questions are consistent with those
    addressed in Environment Canadas Horizontal
    Roll-up of the Thematic Evaluation Results for
    the CAA.
  • Relevance
  • Is there an ongoing need for the Clean Energy
    programs?
  • Are the Clean Energy programs consistent with
    government priorities and NRCans Strategic
    Objectives?
  • Is there a legitimate, appropriate and necessary
    role for the federal government in delivering the
    Clean Energy programs?
  • Performance
  • To what extent have intended outcomes been
    achieved as a result of the Clean Energy
    programs?
  • Are the Clean Energy programs economic and
    efficient means of achieving outputs and progress
    towards outcomes?

10
Findings - Relevance
  1. Is there an ongoing need for the Clean Energy
    programs?

CET Programs Needs Discussion
ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses Yes There is an ongoing need to improve energy efficiency in the industrial, residential, commercial/institutional sectors, and to reduce the consumption of energy generated by fossil fuels in order to reduce GHG emissions. While there is an ongoing need for the capacity building elements of the ecoENERGY Retrofit programs, the role of financial incentives is less clear.
ecoENERGY for Retrofit Homes Yes There is an ongoing need to improve energy efficiency in the industrial, residential, commercial/institutional sectors, and to reduce the consumption of energy generated by fossil fuels in order to reduce GHG emissions. While there is an ongoing need for the capacity building elements of the ecoENERGY Retrofit programs, the role of financial incentives is less clear.
ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO Yes There is an ongoing need to improve energy efficiency in the industrial, residential, commercial/institutional sectors, and to reduce the consumption of energy generated by fossil fuels in order to reduce GHG emissions. While there is an ongoing need for the capacity building elements of the ecoENERGY Retrofit programs, the role of financial incentives is less clear.
ecoENERGY for Industry Yes There is an ongoing need to improve energy efficiency in the industrial, residential, commercial/institutional sectors, and to reduce the consumption of energy generated by fossil fuels in order to reduce GHG emissions. While there is an ongoing need for the capacity building elements of the ecoENERGY Retrofit programs, the role of financial incentives is less clear.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Unclear Given that programs have or are on track to achieve long-term objectives, there may not be a need to continue the programs in their current form beyond March 2011.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat Unclear Given that programs have or are on track to achieve long-term objectives, there may not be a need to continue the programs in their current form beyond March 2011.
ecoENERGY Technology Initiative Yes There is a continued need for the programs to accelerate the development and market readiness of clean energy technology solutions, and to identify long-term solutions to reduce and eliminate air pollutants from energy production and use.
11
Findings - Relevance
  1. Are the Clean Energy programs consistent with
    government priorities and NRCan/INAC Strategic
    Objectives?

CET Programs Govt Priorities Discussion
ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses Yes The energy efficiency and renewable energy programs are aligned to the federal governments commitments to reduce energy related to GHG emissions and CACs, and to NRCans objective related to environmental responsibility. The programs are consistent with NRCans Strategic Objective Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.
ecoENERGY Retrofit Homes Yes The energy efficiency and renewable energy programs are aligned to the federal governments commitments to reduce energy related to GHG emissions and CACs, and to NRCans objective related to environmental responsibility. The programs are consistent with NRCans Strategic Objective Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.
ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO Yes The energy efficiency and renewable energy programs are aligned to the federal governments commitments to reduce energy related to GHG emissions and CACs, and to NRCans objective related to environmental responsibility. The programs are consistent with NRCans Strategic Objective Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.
ecoENERGY for Industry Yes The energy efficiency and renewable energy programs are aligned to the federal governments commitments to reduce energy related to GHG emissions and CACs, and to NRCans objective related to environmental responsibility. The programs are consistent with NRCans Strategic Objective Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Yes The energy efficiency and renewable energy programs are aligned to the federal governments commitments to reduce energy related to GHG emissions and CACs, and to NRCans objective related to environmental responsibility. The programs are consistent with NRCans Strategic Objective Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat Yes The energy efficiency and renewable energy programs are aligned to the federal governments commitments to reduce energy related to GHG emissions and CACs, and to NRCans objective related to environmental responsibility. The programs are consistent with NRCans Strategic Objective Canada is a world leader on environmental responsibility in the development and use of natural resources.
ecoENERGY Technology Initiative Yes The programs (CEPG and Oil Gas) address long-term solutions by carrying out ST and contributing to the overall Government of Canada Outcome of A clean and healthy environment.
12
Findings - Relevance
  1. Is there a legitimate, appropriate, and necessary
    role for the federal government in delivering the
    Clean Energy programs?

CET Programs Role Discussion
ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses Yes Given the departments supporting legislation and mandate, NRCan plays a key role in energy efficiency programming. NRCan also plays a leadership and coordination role in promoting energy efficiency across the country, in particular through collaboration activities and the provision of tools, information, training, and technical expertise. With respect to financial incentives, some concern was raised about the precise role the federal government should play, primarily in relation to retrofit incentives.
ecoENERGY Retrofit Homes Yes Given the departments supporting legislation and mandate, NRCan plays a key role in energy efficiency programming. NRCan also plays a leadership and coordination role in promoting energy efficiency across the country, in particular through collaboration activities and the provision of tools, information, training, and technical expertise. With respect to financial incentives, some concern was raised about the precise role the federal government should play, primarily in relation to retrofit incentives.
ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO Yes Given the departments supporting legislation and mandate, NRCan plays a key role in energy efficiency programming. NRCan also plays a leadership and coordination role in promoting energy efficiency across the country, in particular through collaboration activities and the provision of tools, information, training, and technical expertise. With respect to financial incentives, some concern was raised about the precise role the federal government should play, primarily in relation to retrofit incentives.
ecoENERGY for Industry Yes Given the departments supporting legislation and mandate, NRCan plays a key role in energy efficiency programming. NRCan also plays a leadership and coordination role in promoting energy efficiency across the country, in particular through collaboration activities and the provision of tools, information, training, and technical expertise. With respect to financial incentives, some concern was raised about the precise role the federal government should play, primarily in relation to retrofit incentives.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Yes The Renewable Energy Evaluation reveals that the programs played a leadership role in the development of provincial renewable heat and power policies.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat Yes The Renewable Energy Evaluation reveals that the programs played a leadership role in the development of provincial renewable heat and power policies.
ecoENERGY Technology Initiative Yes A government presence in research brings together various private and public sector players to reduce duplication of research across jurisdictions. The Program contributes to the achievement of government priorities by advancing the deployment of clean coal, renewable energy and advanced nuclear technologies.
13
Findings - Performance
  1. To what extent have intended outcomes been
    achieved as a result of the Clean Energy programs?
  • Approach
  • The roll-up assessed the extent to which each of
    the six NRCan Clean Energy programs has achieved,
    or is on track to achieving, the outcomes
    identified in the consolidated Clean Energy Theme
    logic model presented below. This assessment is
    based on the information contained in the
    evaluations of the six Clean Energy programs,
    which identified various levels of attribution
    across individual programs.

ULTIMATE
Reduced emissions of GHGs and CACs from clean
energy activities
INTERMEDIATE
Availability of innovative, market-ready energy
processes, products, and services that result in
reduced GHGs and CACs
Adoption of renewable energy products and
services, and strengthened infrastructure,
resulting in reduced GHGs and CACs
Adoption of energy efficiency products and
services that result in reduced GHGs and CACs
IMMEDIATE
Awareness and understanding among stakeholders of
the potential for, and methods of, reducing GHGs
and CACs through energy production and use
Transfer and/or use of clean energy technologies
and practices leading to lower emissions of GHGs
and CACs
Involvement by industry in developing and using
energy efficiency products, services, and
processes that result in lower emissions of GHGs
and CACs
Partnerships and collaborative agreements with
stakeholders to promote clean energy activities
that result in lower emissions of GHGs and CACs
14
Findings - Performance
  1. To what extent have intended outcomes been
    achieved as a result of the Clean Energy programs?
  • The table below shows which ecoENERGY programs
    contributed to each of the logic model outcomes,
    which are presented in greater detail in the
    slides that follow.

IMMEDIATE
INTERMEDIATE
ULTIMATE
15
Immediate Outcome Partnerships and
collaborative agreements
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses
  • Through collaborative activities with provinces,
    territories, utilities and other organizations,
    the Initiative has encouraged other jurisdictions
    (e.g., provinces/territories) to incorporate
    energy efficiency into their building codes and
    has effectively extended the reach of NRCans
    energy efficiency programs in the residential
    sector.
  • ecoENERGY for Retrofit Homes
  • The Homes component of the ecoENERGY for Retrofit
    Initiative has signed 23 agreements with
    provinces, territories, utilities and other
    stakeholders to formalize links with
    complementary programs.
  • ecoENERGY for Industry
  • Collaborative activities, particularly through
    the Canadian Industry Program for Energy
    Conservation, have created a strong link between
    the federal government and industry, thereby
    ensuring that energy efficiency programming
    effectively aligns with industrial sector needs
    and capacity.
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
  • The Initiative has effectively engaged a range of
    stakeholders, and undertaken collaborative
    projects.
  • The extent to which the projects have leveraged
    resources from OGDs, university and industry is a
    good indicator of engagement, and the degree to
    which projects address the needs of partners.
  • Program involvement in research networks has also
    leveraged additional funds and helped to build
    linkages with other stakeholders.
  • Conclusions
  • Clean Energy programs have successfully
    cultivated partnerships and collaboration with
    stakeholder to advance their activities.

16
Immediate Outcome Industry involvement
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Power
  • The evaluation found that the Program has
    successfully engaged industry, and has increased
    the rate of renewable power installations in
    Canada.
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat
  • Through contribution agreements, the Program has
    encouraged industry involvement, which has
    contributed to fostering activity in the area of
    renewable heat.
  • The evaluation identified an increase in the
    number of firms and trained installers involved
    with solar thermal capacity. However, the
    industry remains small (less than 100 firms and a
    few hundred full-time equivalent staff) without
    many of the attributes of a mature industrial
    sector.
  • ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO
  • The ecoENERGY Retrofit for Small and Medium
    Organizations (Industry) Program did not meet its
    energy savings and GHG emission reductions
    targets. It was estimated that 26 of the energy
    savings achieved are directly attributable to the
    Program.
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
  • Although the Initiative has been reasonably
    successful in engaging partners, private sector
    capacity to participate has been limited by a
    number of factors such as the long-term nature of
    some of the research, the high costs of the
    technologies and the recent economic recession
    which has decreased private sector capacity to
    invest in technological innovation.
  • Conclusions
  • Clean Energy programs have successfully engaged
    industry in the development and implementation of
    energy efficient products, services and processes
    where it is feasible for industry to be involved.

17
Immediate OutcomeTransfer and/or use of clean
energy technologies and practices
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Technology Initiative
  • The CEPG Program contributed to the capacity of
    partners and other stakeholders to engage in RD
    and deployment of clean electric power
    generation, a logical precursor to technology
    transfer and up-take of RD.
  • While the activities under the ecoENERGY
    Technology Initiative lay the groundwork for
    large scale deployment of the new and improved
    technologies, there are a number of barriers to
    overcome before this can occur. The key barriers
    identified are
  • the low cost of conventional electricity makes
    many alternative energy sources uncompetitive
    without incentives
  • a long-term, comprehensive and integrated energy
    policy and regulatory framework is needed to
    encourage uptake from utilities and private
    sector (federal-provincial cooperation
    imperative)
  • risk-averse culture in energy firms and utilities
    due to recession and energy policy environment
    and
  • intellectual property issues related to clean
    energy technology development.
  • The Oil Gas Program contributed to the ability
    of industry to reduce the impact of tailings
    ponds by funding a large pilot and commercial
    scale support for dry stackable tailings
    technology development and automated clay
    activity determination.
  • Conclusion
  • The ecoENERGY programs (CEPG and Oil Gas) have
    contributed to the development of new
    technologies, but broader use of these
    technologies is limited by a myriad of factors,
    such as cost and the economy.

18
Immediate Outcome Awareness and understanding
among stakeholders
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses
  • In total, 7,400 builder and energy advisor
    professionals were trained in the construction of
    energy efficient new homes and buildings as well
    as to encourage retrofits to improve the energy
    efficiency of the existing stock. This exceeded
    the Program target of 5,000 trained
    professionals. The evaluation found that 67 of
    homebuilders have learned new construction
    techniques as a result of being enrolled in one
    or more of the new houses initiatives (EnerGuide
    for New Houses, ENERGY STAR for New Homes, or
    R-2000 Standard).
  • ecoENERGY for Industry
  • Capacity building activities, such as Dollars to
    ense and Canadian Industry Program for Energy
    Conservation Leaders are increasing awareness and
    understanding of energy management best practices
    and energy efficiency measures. In addition the
    benchmarking and technical studies are providing
    industrial firms with the information and tools
    necessary to make energy efficiency changes.
  • ecoENERGY for Technology Initiative
  • Contributed to CEPG projects that have produced a
    variety of publications, analyses, best practices
    manuals, and analytical techniques and tools that
    allow stakeholders to evaluate the energy
    production and savings, costs, emission
    reductions, financial viability and risk for
    various types of renewable energy and
    energy-efficient technologies. However, the
    performance measurement system could be improved
    to increase knowledge of level of stakeholder
    awareness and uptake of knowledge products.
  • Conclusion
  • Where Clean Energy programs contain an awareness
    building component, activities are contributing
    to increasing awareness among stakeholders of
    methods of reducing GHGs and CACs through energy
    production and use.

19
Intermediate Outcome Adoption of energy
efficiency products and services
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Retrofit Homes
  • The financial incentive activity-based programs
    are encouraging homeowners to adopt energy
    management best practices and implement energy
    efficiency measures. These programs are
    resulting in measurable energy savings and GHG
    emission reductions, and evidence suggests that
    84 of energy savings are directly attributable
    to the Program. Moreover, homeowners are
    undertaking double the number of retrofits they
    had originally planned and 60 are motivated to
    undertake further measures outside of the
    Program.
  • ecoENERGY for Retrofit SMO
  • Financial incentive activity-based programs in
    the industrial and commercial/institutional
    sectors are achieving GHG emission reductions and
    energy savings but not to the extent anticipated
    when targets for the programs were set. The
    evaluation found that 26 of energy savings can
    be attributed to financial incentive programs in
    the industrial sector, and 46 of energy savings
    can be attributed to financial incentive programs
    in the commercial/institutional sector
    (consisting of ecoENERGY as well as previous
    programs).
  • ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses and ecoENERGY
    for Industry
  • Capacity building activities within ecoENERGY
    programs have been found to encourage adoption of
    energy management best practices and
    implementation of energy efficiency measures
    within the industrial and commercial/institutional
    sectors, and to contribute to increased energy
    efficiency of houses across Canada.
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
  • Within CEPG, ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
    funding has supported the development of a
    simplified demonstration version of the Coal Fire
    Software that has helped industry optimize boiler
    performance, diagnose operational problems,
    reduce emissions and improve efficiency.
  • The CEPG evaluation found that the Program is
    funding research projects that have good
    potential to lead to adoption of energy efficient
    products and processes in the near future (e.g.,
    micro-generators, combined heat and power
    systems, etc.).
  • Conclusion
  • Clean Energy programs have had a positive impact
    in influencing adoption of energy efficiency
    products and services.

20
Intermediate Outcome Adoption of renewable
energy products and services
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Power
  • The ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Program is
    associated with an increased rate of renewable
    power installations in Canada, however, direct
    attribution of increased installations to program
    activities is not possible.
  • During its first two years, projects totalling a
    capacity of 1,300 megawatts had been commissioned
    and projects with 1,800 megawatts were under
    construction for a total of 3,100 megawatts
    (target was 4,000 megawatts by March 31, 2011).
  • The ecoENERGY for Renewable Power Program has
    demonstrated leadership and has helped launch the
    renewable power industry, particularly wind
    power.
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat
  • The ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat Program is
    associated with stimulating activity in the area
    of renewable heat, however, attributing these
    activities to program activities is difficult.
  • After two years, the Program supported 334 solar
    thermal projects (target is 700 systems by March
    31, 2011), 97 individual solar water pilots in
    residential buildings and several industrial
    capacity initiatives.
  • The ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat Program may have
    increased the capacity of the industry to deliver
    quality renewable heat systems into the Canadian
    market but the industry remains small.
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
  • Within CEPG, the ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
    contributed to the development and enhancement of
    wind energy forecasting and simulation tools that
    are used by Canadas wind energy industry,
    consultants and the general public to determine
    the wind energy potential of sites throughout
    Canada.
  • Conclusion
  • Clean Energy programs have met, or are on track
    to increasing adoption of renewable energy
    products and services, although the evaluations
    indicated that it is not possible to directly
    attribute the achievement of these outcomes to
    the programs due to interacting factors and
    considerations.

21
Intermediate Outcome Availability of
innovative, market-ready energy processes,
products, services
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat
  • The Program has supported activities related to
    increased deployment of renewable thermal
    technologies (e.g., developing performance and
    installation standards, making technologies more
    affordable through incentives, etc.).
  • ecoENERGY Technology Initiative
  • The ecoENERGY Technology Initiative has
    successfully delivered on its objective of
    advancing ST through the provision of technical
    outputs and immediate outcomes (e.g., knowledge,
    expertise, and technology).
  • The Program has supported a number of projects
    that have developed and/or demonstrated new or
    improved technologies (e.g., Very Low Head (VLH)
    Turbine design for Canadian conditions). These
    new technologies offer the potential of
    increasing the electricity supply from renewable
    and distributed systems and improving the
    economics and efficiency of these systems.
  • The Program has also contributed to the
    development of new codes and standards which may
    have contributed to a number of provincial and
    municipal regulations and helped shape provincial
    and Environment Canadas energy and environmental
    policies.
  • The Program has not yet realized the achievement
    of intermediate and ultimate outcomes to any
    significant extent. This is primarily due to the
    long-term time horizon required for
    commercialization, and the fact that many of the
    activities within the ecoENERGY Technology
    Initiative have only recently been implemented.
  • Nevertheless, the evaluation identified some
    examples of market uptake or deployment of new or
    improved technologies stemming from
    program-funded projects, including a wind energy
    simulation software tool.
  • Conclusions
  • Although the programs have successfully delivered
    their ST outputs, due to the long-term nature of
    ST programs and the recent implementation of
    projects supported under the programs, it is too
    early to expect achievement of these outcomes.

22
Ultimate Outcome Reduced emissions of GHGs and
CACs from clean energy activities
Findings - Performance
  • Findings
  • ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses
  • The Program had exceeded its targets for training
    and more than 300 buildings were reportedly
    eligible for labels. In its first two years
    (2007-08 and 2008-09), this initiative achieved
    63-71 of its targeted range for energy savings
    and 80 of its GHG emission reductions.
  • ecoENERGY for Retrofit Homes
  • The Program exceeded its target for the number of
    applications/grants. At the end of its first two
    years (2007-08 and 2008-09), it had already
    achieved 64-80 of its targeted range for GHG
    emission reductions and energy savings.
  • ecoENERGY for Retrofit SMO
  • In its first two years (2007-08 and 2008-09),
    this program achieved 57 of its energy savings,
    and 56 of its GHG emission reductions targets.
    Attribution to the programs financial incentive
    activities is only partial as some firms would
    have implemented these changes on their own.
  • ecoENERGY for Industry
  • Awareness building activities and adoption of
    technologies under this program did contribute to
    reduced emissions. At the time of the evaluation,
    the Program had met between 44-185 of the target
    range for energy savings and GHG reductions.
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Power
  • The Program has helped launch the renewable power
    industry, particularly wind power. Moreover, the
    need to develop renewable technologies has become
    much more widely accepted. A clean energy sector
    is emerging, which could contribute to displacing
    use of fossil fuels. However, the energy
    landscape is complex and significant change takes
    time.
  • ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat
  • The Program may have increased the capacity of
    the industry to deliver quality renewable heat
    systems but the industry remains small, limiting
    its ability to displace the use of fossil fuels
    in the near future.
  • ecoENERGY for Technology Initiative
  • While the activities and programs funded within
    CEPG lay the groundwork for increased deployment
    of clean power generation, reduced emissions will
    depend on the degree to which these technologies
    are deployed on a large scale. As this initiative
    was launched in 2008, it is too early to realize
    this outcome.
  • Conclusions
  • There is evidence that ecoENERGY programming has
    contributed to varying degrees in reduced GHG
    emissions and CACs. However, the precise impact
    on this objective is difficult to ascertain
    because of the long-term nature of this goal. The
    successes noted at achieving the intermediate and
    immediate outcomes do suggest that progress is
    being made towards reduced GHGs and CACs due to
    program activities.

23
Findings Performance
  1. Are the Clean Energy programs economic and
    efficient means of achieving outputs and progress
    towards outcomes?

CET Programs Discussion
ecoENERGY for Buildings and Houses The evaluation identified best practices based on the literature that could be explored to improve the cost-effectiveness of incentive-based programming, such as delivering programs in partnership with other jurisdictions promoting whole building comprehensive retrofits and offering financial incentive for high-risk components and/or basing incentives on verified energy savings. While a number of important strategic management practices have been instituted to help ensure the efficiency of programs, some suggestions for potential improvements to the programs include improving communication from NRCan to partners and participants reducing the burden in the application processes, particularly with respect to the ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO program and ensuring user-friendly tools and software, particularly in the residential sector.
ecoENERGY Retrofit Homes The evaluation identified best practices based on the literature that could be explored to improve the cost-effectiveness of incentive-based programming, such as delivering programs in partnership with other jurisdictions promoting whole building comprehensive retrofits and offering financial incentive for high-risk components and/or basing incentives on verified energy savings. While a number of important strategic management practices have been instituted to help ensure the efficiency of programs, some suggestions for potential improvements to the programs include improving communication from NRCan to partners and participants reducing the burden in the application processes, particularly with respect to the ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO program and ensuring user-friendly tools and software, particularly in the residential sector.
ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO The evaluation identified best practices based on the literature that could be explored to improve the cost-effectiveness of incentive-based programming, such as delivering programs in partnership with other jurisdictions promoting whole building comprehensive retrofits and offering financial incentive for high-risk components and/or basing incentives on verified energy savings. While a number of important strategic management practices have been instituted to help ensure the efficiency of programs, some suggestions for potential improvements to the programs include improving communication from NRCan to partners and participants reducing the burden in the application processes, particularly with respect to the ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO program and ensuring user-friendly tools and software, particularly in the residential sector.
ecoENERGY for Industry The evaluation identified best practices based on the literature that could be explored to improve the cost-effectiveness of incentive-based programming, such as delivering programs in partnership with other jurisdictions promoting whole building comprehensive retrofits and offering financial incentive for high-risk components and/or basing incentives on verified energy savings. While a number of important strategic management practices have been instituted to help ensure the efficiency of programs, some suggestions for potential improvements to the programs include improving communication from NRCan to partners and participants reducing the burden in the application processes, particularly with respect to the ecoENERGY Retrofit SMO program and ensuring user-friendly tools and software, particularly in the residential sector.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Power The evaluation indicated that the existing incentive approach has been appropriate to encourage an increase in the supply of clean electricity (primarily wind power) and solar thermal renewable heat. Little, if any, overlap was found with other programs and the application processes was found to be clear.
ecoENERGY for Renewable Heat The evaluation indicated that the existing incentive approach has been appropriate to encourage an increase in the supply of clean electricity (primarily wind power) and solar thermal renewable heat. Little, if any, overlap was found with other programs and the application processes was found to be clear.
ecoENERGY Technology Initiative While performance and financial information is limited, ecoETI is operating efficiently in that the project selection processes ensure that activities are aligned with ecoETI objectives the majority of project deliverables are on schedule and the RD projects involve key stakeholders.
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Overall Conclusions
  • Relevance
  • There is an ongoing need for clean energy
    programming in Canada in terms of capacity
    building, technology development, and transfer.
    However, the role of financial incentive programs
    is less clear.
  • The Clean Energy programs are consistent with
    government priorities and NRCans Strategic
    Objectives in terms of fostering
    environmentally-responsible natural resources
    use, and reducing GHGs and CACs.
  • There is a legitimate, appropriate and necessary
    role for the federal government in delivering the
    Clean Energy programs given NRCans mandated role
    in energy efficiency programming, and leadership
    role in terms of coordinating clean technology
    development.
  • Performance
  • The Clean Energy programs have made progress
    towards achieving all of their targets and
    outcomes.
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