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Chemeketa Community College

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Title: Chemeketa Community College


1
Chemeketa Community College

2
Regional Opportunities Challenges

3
Demographics

4
Demographic trends
Population is forecasted to grow 1.4 annually
through 2040 outpacing the states growth rate
by more than 10. Polk Countys population will
nearly double over that time period and Yamhill
Countys will grow by nearly 70.
5
Demographic trends
  • DISTRICT POPULATION WILL DIVERSIFY
  • Population growth 1990-2006
  • 246
  • 39
  • Total Hispanic

6
Demographic trends
WORKFORCE POPULATION WILL DIVERSIFY
7
Workforce

8
Growth Replacement by Industry 2006-2016
9
District wage projections
FUTURE WAGE EARNING
10
Educational Pipeline

11
Demographic trends
12
Percent of Oregon Residents with No High School
Diploma By Age and Race/Ethnicity, 2006
Source U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 ACS PUMS
13
High School Drop Out Rates
Source Oregon Employment Department
14
Adults Age 18-64 Who Speak English Poorly or Not
at All, 2006
Source U.S. Census Bureau, ACS
15
College-Going RatesFirst-Time Freshmen Directly
Out of High School as a Percent of Recent
High School Graduates, 2004
Source Tom Mortenson, Postsecondary Opportunity
(2004 data update 02-06-07)
16
Financial Resources

17
Budget Summary 0304 to 0910
Budget Year Size of Gap Total General Fund Budget
0304 9.0 Million 53 Million
0405 7.8 Million 53 Million
0506 5.4 Million 54 Million
0607 3.1 Million 56 Million
0708 1.0 Million 58 Million
0809 lt 50,000 62 Million
0910 5.6 Million 63 Million
18
General Fund FTE Changes 0304 to 0910

Year Total

0203 and 0304 (26.43)
0405 (6.39)
0506 (19.06)
0607 6.21
0708 10.69
0809 7.75
0910 (12.29)

Total (42.88)

19
Tuition Rate plus Per Credit Fees
20
Ending Fund Balance
21
Budget Building Process
  • Unit planning
  • Strategic planning
  • Develop budget assumptions
  • Review potential investments
  • Review potential cost reductions
  • Develop balanced budget

22
Budget Principles
  • Comprehensive mission
  • Students and student success priority
  • Quality and cost-effective instruction
  • Minimize loss of access
  • Serve throughout our geography
  • Create a healthy future

23
Budget Principles
  • Increase flexibility and responsiveness
  • Think differently about how to deliver
    instruction and services
  • Seek creative funding options
  • Balance budget with focused reductions and
    strategic investments
  • Transparent and frequent communication

24
Considerations for Cost Reduction
  • Is it legally mandated?
  • How many students are served?
  • What is the cost relative to other College areas?
  • Has this area been the prior subject of review?

25
Considerations for Cost Reduction
  • Could outcomes be met in another way?
  • Considering College mission and goals, among our
    choices, which investments have the greatest
    impact and which cost reductions have the least
    impact?

26
Budget Strategies
  • Restructure selected academic programs based on
    cost and enrollment status
  • Administrative reorganization
  • Restructure and reduce funding to selected
    college and student support services
  • Make use of vacancy reductions where possible
  • Shift resources to meeting most critical
    immediate and strategic needs

27
Other Considerations
  • Legislative process
  • Dynamic economic environment
  • Collective bargaining
  • Our position relative to other colleges
  • Biennial budget
  • Long-term trends

28
Request to Employees
  • Seek to understand and contribute ideas
  • Help promote effective communication and address
    rumors
  • Find ways to work with uncertainty
  • Focus on service to students
  • Contribute to long-term strategies for financial
    sustainability

29
National ContextEconomic Challenges for Higher
Education

30
The Project on the Future of Higher
Education
  • Dealing with the Future Now
  • Principles for Creating a Vital Campus in a
  • Climate of Restricted Resources
  • Alan E. Guskin
  • Director, Project on the Future of Higher
    Education
  • Distinguished University Professor
  • University President Emeritus
  • Antioch University

31
State of Higher Education and the Future
Reduced Financial Support
Demographic Shifts
  • New Institutional Forms to Respond to Changing
    Societal Needs Pressures
  • New Student Learning Needs

External Accountability Demands
Mistrust of Professionals
New Technology and Demands for Use
32
Facing Economic Reality
  • ...states' fiscal problems are only partly due
    to the cyclical downturn in the economy. Two
    long-standing structural problems--an eroding tax
    base and the explosion in health care costs--are
    the major causes ... the current problem is
    long-run and structural.
  • Ray Scheppach, Executive Director
  • National Governors Association, 2003
  • The pattern from the 1990s suggests that
    reductions in higher education appropriations are
    implemented during an economic downturn and then
    made permanent by a failure to raise
    appropriations substantially during the
    subsequent economic recovery.
  • The Brookings Institution, 2003

33
Findings from a Recent Study by The National
Center for Public Policy and Higher Education
  • States, and higher education in particular, are
    likely to face very tight budget conditions for
    the next decade.
  • All but a handful of states will find it
    impossible to maintain current levels of public
    services within their existing tax structure.
  • Just to maintain current services, state spending
    for higher education would have to increase
    faster than state spending in other areas.
  • From State Shortfalls Projected Throughout the
    Decade Higher Ed Budgets Likely to Feel
    Continued Squeeze, by Dennis Jones in Policy
    Alert, The National Center for Public Policy and
    Higher Education, February, 2003

34
Educational Assumptions in Muddling Through As
a Response to Economic Challenges
  • Present Educational Delivery System (faculty
    teaching students in classes over set period of
    time) is effective and there is no viable
    alternative to assure quality teaching and
    learning.
  • Increasing diversity of students and recognition
    of diverse student learning modes. (But no need
    to change how students are taught.)
  • Technology can augment faculty teaching, should
    never replace it.

35
Educational Assumptions in Muddling Through As
a Response to Economic Challenges
  • Present assessment system is OK learning
    outcomes are very difficult to quantify as well
    as meet need for transferability
  • Limited resources and increasing expenses can be
    handled by non-personnel cuts in administrative
    areas and hiring of inexpensive faculty (P/T F/T
    without tenure)
  • Recognition that there are not enough fiscal
    resources in non-academic areas to avoid cuts in
    academic area

36
Problems with Muddling Through Strategy Over
Time
  • Increases in fund raising cannot be annually
    ratcheted upfund raising will not offset major
    continuing reductions in real dollar resources
  • Tuition levels cannot be significantly increased
    annually without changing nature of student body
  • Required increases in technology add significant
    costs to budget without any savings
  • Many budget reductions are one-time only or
    cannot be continually decreased without
    devastating results

37
Problems with Muddling Through Strategy Over
Time
  • Quality of Faculty and staff work-lives will be
    undermined
  • Student Learning will deterioratedecreasing
    availability of courses needed increasing class
    size decreasing access to faculty decreasing
    quality of learning environment.
  • Continuing incremental changes may create an
    institution that we do not want to be part of.

38
Transition from Muddling Through to Transforming
Institution
  • Transition requires a shift in thinking
  • Need to challenge basic assumptions about how
    student learning can occur
  • Need to refocus from emphasis on faculty teaching
    to emphasis on student learning
  • Need to re-conceptualize institutional
    productivity--from faculty productivity to
    student learning productivity

39
Transition from Muddling Through to Transforming
Institution
  • To make such a transition, campus members must
    have a level of pain or anticipatory pain that
    induces them to realize that there is an urgency
    to undertake fundamental change.
  • Campus members must believe that present fiscal
    realities are long term (5-10 years) not short
    term (1-2 years)

40
New Educational Assumptions for Transition to
Transformed Institution
  • Student learning can occur in many different ways
    inside and outside the classroom
  • Need to develop cost effective quality learning
    options based on new instructional strategies
  • Technology can be effectively used in core
    instruction while assuring quality and reducing
    cost per student
  • Assessment of student learning outcomes is key to
    developing new instructional and learning
    strategies while maintaining academic integrity
    with limited resources

41
New Educational Assumptions for Transition to
Transformed Institution
  • Faculty roles must change in order to maintain
    reasonable workloads and quality of work-life
    within academic standards
  • There will be fewer faculty
  • Digital resources and new library roles can
    support development and implementation of
    alternative teaching and learning strategies.
  • New organizational systems are needed to support
    a changed educational delivery system

42
Six Reasons that Organization Changes Fail
  • Insufficient integration into core goals
  • Lack of comprehensive / accepted assessment
    framework to measure success
  • Inability to translate vision for change into
    language/ action that can be embraced
  • Failure to establish accountability process to
    ensure that non-compliance is met with real
    consequences
  • Williams, Damon A., Berger, J.B., McClendon, S.A.
    Toward a Model of Inclusive Excellence and
    Change in Postsecondary Institutions. American
    Association of Colleges and Universities. 2005

43
Six Reasons that Organization Changes Fail
  • Low levels of meaningful / consistent support
    from senior institutional leaders throughout the
    change process
  • Resistance to allocating sufficient resources to
    ensure that vision for change is driven deep into
    organizational culture
  • Williams, Damon A., Berger, J.B., McClendon, S.A.
    Toward a Model of Inclusive Excellence and
    Change in Postsecondary Institutions. American
    Association of Colleges and Universities. 2005

44
So What? Now What?
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