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Better Business Cases Practitioner Course Module Two: The Preferred Solution

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Title: Better Business Cases Detailed 2012 Author: New Zealand Treasury Last modified by: Chris Daish [CASS] Created Date: 9/18/2007 3:18:13 AM Document presentation ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Better Business Cases Practitioner Course Module Two: The Preferred Solution


1
Better Business Cases Practitioner Course Module
Two The Preferred Solution
10 October 2013
2
Practitioner Course (Module Two) Housekeeping
  • Welcome
  • Introductions
  • Registration
  • Are we comfortable?
  • Apologies?
  • Objectives by the end of today.
  • Agenda
  • Parking lot other expectations?

3
Practitioner Course (Module Two) Objectives
  • To develop a working knowledge of the content and
    structure of the Detailed and Implementation
    business cases.
  • To develop the key skills required to develop
    Detailed and Implementation business cases, by
  • Identifying monetary and non-monetary benefits
  • Identifying and presenting the preferred option
    by applying
  • cost benefit analysis (CBA)
  • multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA)
  • quantitative risk analysis (QRA)
  • To appreciate the importance of involving key
    stakeholders, customers and suppliers in the
    business case development process.

4
Agenda
Introductions
Learning Point Q A session
Detailed Business Case Economic Case Presentation
Morning tea
Benefits and costs Presentation and Exercise One Identifying and categorising benefits
Cost Benefit Analysis Presentation and Exercise Two Cost Benefit Analysis
Lunch Break
Intangibles and Risk Analysis Presentation and Exercise Three Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Presentation Risk analysis
Afternoon Tea
Commercial, Financial, Management Cases Presentation and Exercise Four Risk register and commercials
Implementation Business Case Presentation
Wrapping-up, parking lot and evaluation
Close at 400pm
5
Learning Point - QA Session
6
1. What is the main purpose of the Detailed
Business Case?
  1. To seek final funding approval prior to
    implementing
  2. To seek approval to issue the Request for
    Proposal (RFP)
  3. To provide the detailed analysis omitted from the
    indicative business case

7
2. When should a Detailed Business Case be
prepared?
  1. For large scale information technology investment
    proposals
  2. When requested by Treasury
  3. Once the preferred way forward is approved
  4. As soon as possible

8
3. On what basis should a short-listed option be
preferred?
  1. If the net present value of monetary benefits
    exceeds the net present value of costs
  2. If the payback period is less than five years
  3. If it is the optimal mix of costs, benefits and
    risks

9
4. What is the difference (if any) between an
Economic Assessment and a Financial Costing?
  • Nothing simply terminology
  • Value for Money as opposed to Affordability
  • The financial costing ignores benefits and costs
    that do not impact on the bottom line

10
5. What is the recognised standard for Economic
Assessment of Public Sector spending proposals?
  1. Cost Effectiveness Analysis
  2. Cost Utility Analysis
  3. Regulatory Impact Analysis
  4. Cost Benefit Analysis
  5. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis
  6. a robust ranking exercise

11
6. How many options should the Detailed Business
Case address?
  1. 12
  2. 5 (the short-list options)
  3. 2 (the public sector comparator versus the PPP
    option)
  4. 1 (if this is the only option available)

12
7. Economic Assessments should reflect how many
years?
  1. the expected life or duration of the contract
  2. the expected life or duration of the asset
  3. typically 20 years

13
8. When is it necessary to undertake Quantitative
Risk Analysis (QRA)?
  • for high risk investment proposals
  • for all investments, where fit for purpose
  • if two short-listed options have
    indistinguishable net benefits
  • when directed by the State Services Commission
  • when planning a trip to Monte Carlo

14
9. Service risks should be?
  1. transferred to the parties best placed to manage
    the risk
  2. shared between the organisation and service
    suppliers
  3. dealt with as they occur

15

Unpacking the Detailed Business Case The
Economic Case
Programme Strategic Assessment
Programme Business Case
Project Strategic Assessment
Indicative Business Case
Detailed Business Case
Implementation Business Case
Single Stage Business Case
Project Strategic Assessment
16
Detailed Business Case - The Economic Case
Revisit the Indicative Business Case
Risks
Benefits
CSFs
Long List Options
Options Assessment
Short-list Options
Economic Assessment
Risk Analysis
Intangible Benefits
Procurement Strategy
Sensitivity Testing
Indicative Costs
Preferred Option
Management Strategy
17
The Assessment Process
  • A systematic process to identify the best value
    for money option
  • The objective is to fully inform decision-making
  • Needs to be fit for purpose (cf Scoping Document)

Consider intangible costs benefits
Risk analysis
Analyse the short listed options
Estimate costs and benefits
Identify costs and benefits
Assumptions
Sensitivity test and present
Bench-marking Revealed preference methods
(Hedonic pricing) Stated preference methods
(Willingness to pay)
Revisit the benefits (80/20) and indicative costs
identified in Indicative Business Case
Scope Appraisal period Discount rate
Multi-criteria decision analysis
Scenario testing Tell the story Trade-offs Preferr
ed option
Revisit the risks (80/20) identified in
Indicative Business Case Quantitative risk
analysis Monte Carlo
Cost Benefit Analysis
18
Scope Assumption - National Economy
  • NZ, region, sector or organisation perspective?
  • NZ inc preferred.national economy or
    general equilibrium analysis
  • Consider ALL sectors of the economy
  • because the actions of one agency can impose
    costs or benefits on individuals or the nation as
    a whole
  • Eg, Govt subsidises beef meat producers. This
    results in a lower price for beef, which in turn
    decreases demand for sheep meat. Need to take
    into account both beef and sheep meat markets
  • BUT could agree to constrained scope for
    internalised benefits and costs (eg new payroll
    system)

19
Appraisal Period?
  • The period of analysis, typically the useful life
    of the asset
  • or the contract term (if longer)
  • If different options result in differing
    appraisal periods
  • could use the shorter period and apply a residual
    value to the longer asset/contract, or
  • could use the longer period and assume
    reinvestment of the shorter asset/contract

20
Discount Rate Exercise
Discount rate Todays Price Effective Interest rate
0 100,000 0.00
1 99,000 1.01
2 98,000 2.04
3 97,000 3.09
4 96,000 4.17
5 95,000 5.26
6 94,000 6.38
7 93,000 7.53
8 92,000 8.70
9 91,000 9.89
10 90,000 11.11
15 85,000 17.65
20 80,000 25.00
  • How much would you be prepared to borrow (lend)
    today? In return for payment (receipt) of
    100,000 in one years time?
  • Lender lends PRICE today and receives 100,000
    in one year
  • Borrower borrows PRICE today and repays
    100,000 in one year

21
Discount Rate
  • Effectively the return that an investor (eg the
    Crown) would expect to receive compared to the
    best alternative investment (eg by the Crown in
    other public services or by repaying Crown debt).
  • Investing has an opportunity cost, related to
  • the cost of capital
  • the risk of default
  • administration and tax costs, and
  • any profit margin (eg, for a private bank).
  • The UK Government discount rate reflects a social
    rate of time preference. A lower discount rate
    is used to compensate for societys preference
    for shorter term benefits and consumption now,
    rather than longer term benefits and deferred
    consumption.

22
Public Sector Discount Rate
Category Discount rate
Default rate (for projects that are difficult to categorise including regulatory proposals) 8.0 pa
General purpose office and accommodation buildings 6.5 pa
Infrastructure and special purpose (single-use) buildings water and energy , prisons, hospitals, hospital energy plants road and other transport projects 8.0 pa
Telecommunications, media and technology , IT and equipment, knowledge economy (RD) 9.5 pa
Nb These are real, risk adjusted discount rates
and should only be applied to costs and benefits
that do not include general price inflation
adjustments. Updated regularly by Treasury
(latest Oct 2010) and available from
http//www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/guidance/
planning/costbenefitanalysis
23
Benefits and Costs
24
Identifying Potential Benefits (recap)
A gain or improvement. Or a loss (ie dis-benefit)
. by a beneficiary (group or individual).. . by a beneficiary (group or individual)..
attributable as a result of the proposed investment. - directly or - indirectly (unintended consequences) Or not attributable to the proposed investment. - ie by external influences
and measurable - quantitative only - monetary Or observable, but non-measurable - ie an intangible
  • Refer to the BBC Benefits Management Guide
  • Q1 Are the benefit classes sufficiently
    comprehensive?
  • Q2 Are benefits from a national economy
    perspective?

25
Categorising Benefits
Quantifiable (monetary)
Quantifiable (non-monetary)
Qualitative (intangible non-monetary)
Indirect
NZ productivity gains
more/ less disposable income
National security
redundancies
more leisure time
Direct to Society
less road deaths
public safety
time savings, due to less compliance
public health
better insulated houses
increased access
lower prices
stronger communities
reduced unemployment
reduced staff absenteeism/ turnover
workplace culture
higher revenues
Direct to Org
reduced/ avoided costs
efficiency gains
26
Assigning Monetary Values to Intangibles?
What are your marginal benefits or dis-benefits
if the neighbouring reserve was to be developed
into a.?
OR
OR
27
Revealed and Stated Preference Methods
  • Hedonic pricing
  • uses the different prices of a traded good to
    estimate the value of a non-traded good.
  • Eg the cost of aircraft noise disturbance on the
    community can be estimated by comparing house
    prices in noise-affected areas with prices of
    similar houses in similar non-affected areas
  • Willingness to Pay
  • asks people about their preferences.
  • Eg a survey of how much people are willing to pay
    to preserve a natural wilderness area.

28
Revisiting the Indicative Business Case The POSS
Case Study
Programme Strategic Assessment
Programme Business Case
Project Strategic Assessment
Indicative Business Case
Detailed Business Case
Implementation Business Case
Single Stage Business Case
Project Strategic Assessment
29
MISS Investing to Improve Procurement/V4
MISS Project Team
To reduce costs
To improve efficiency of service delivery
To improve quality of services
Services and Supplies (7) Utilities, building
services, telecoms IT, office supplies, travel,
catering, and cars
Depts (10) A, B, C..K
Suppliers
Public
Outputs Delivered
Outcomes Achieved (intended unintended)
Inputs Employed
Business processes
30
POSS Indicative Business Case Short-listed
Options
Base Case Status Quo/ Do nothing
Less Ambitious (Public Sector Comparator) 3 Depts A, B, C Utilities and building services In-house services (including cross-agency collaboration and lead agency delivery) Phased 18 months, Public funded
Preferred Way Forward 3 Depts A, B, C Utilities, building services, office supplies, telecoms and IMT Out-sourced services (including supplier panels) Phased over 18 months, Public funded
More Ambitious 3 Depts A, B, C Utilities, building services, office supplies, telecoms and IMT Strategic Partner (ie bundled services provided by private sector partner under a single contract) Phased over 18 months, Private funded
31
Unpacking the Economic Case Cost Benefit Analysis
32
The Assessment Process
  • A systematic process to identify the best value
    for money option

Consider intangible costs benefits
Risk analysis
Analyse the short listed options
Estimate costs and benefits
Identify costs and benefits
Assumptions
Sensitivity test and present
Revisit the benefits (80/20) and indicative costs
identified in Indicative Business Case
Scope Appraisal period Discount rate
Multi-criteria decision analysis
Cost Benefit Analysis
Revisit the risks (80/20) identified in
Indicative Business Case Quantitative risk
analysis Monte Carlo
Bench-marking Revealed preference methods
(Hedonic pricing) Stated preference methods
(Willingness to pay)
Scenario testing Tell the story Trade-offs Preferr
ed option
33
Invest or Not?
34
Decision should allow for Opportunity Cost
35
What does the Calculation look like?
Refer to the Tertiary Education Commission CBA
spreadsheet template at http//www.tec.govt.nz/Te
rtiary-Sector/Crown-Interest/Business-Cases/Step-T
wo--Business-Case-Development/
36
What is Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA)?
  • an economic assessment tool
  • CBA quantifies all costs and benefits in monetary
    terms, and discounts to todays dollar
    equivalents (Present Value)
  • Present value cash flow ()/(1discount
    rate)n
  • Eg 10 expected in 5 years time at 8pa
    10/(1.08)5 6.81 now
  • Objective Present Value of expected benefits gt
    Present Value of expected costs (ie NPV
    positive)
  • CBA can be used to quantitatively rank
    alternative options (NPVA() gt NPVB())

37
Why use Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA)?
  • Decision-makers can be provided with a consistent
    and systematic basis for comparing proposals with
    different levels of estimated benefits at
    different times
  • Does the proposal provide a net benefit to the
    community as a whole?
  • Should an existing project or programme be
    continued?
  • Which option is preferred (on the basis of net
    monetary benefits)?
  • Which of various alternative projects or
    programmes should be undertaken?

38
Some Rules for Applying CBA
  • DO assign monetary values if possible (and
    credible!)
  • INCLUDE all cash flows and opportunity costs
  • DONT
  • over-cook the analysis (make it fit for purpose)
  • double-count benefits
  • attribute benefits that do not result from the
    investment
  • inflate values for general inflation
  • EXCLUDE
  • sunk costs (interested in marginal costs
    benefits only)
  • financing costs (included in the discount rate)
  • depreciation (a non-cash allowance for wear)
  • transfer payments (eg taxes and social benefits)
  • optimism bias (to the extent the discount rate is
    risk adjusted)

39
CBA vs CEA vs CUA
Cost Benefit Analysis Cost Benefit Analysis Cost Effectiveness Analysis Cost Effectiveness Analysis Cost Utility Analysis Cost Utility Analysis
PV of Benefits () PV of Costs () PV of Benefits () PV of Costs () Quantitative Benefits (n) PV of Costs () Quantitative Benefits (n) PV of Costs () Intangible Benefits (U) PV of Costs () Intangible Benefits (U) PV of Costs ()
Option A lt Option B Option A lt Option B Option A lt Option B Option A lt Option B Option A lt Option B Option A lt Option B
150 100 250 100 15 100 25 100 U 150 U 100
BBC preferred for monetary benefits and costs. BBC preferred for monetary benefits and costs. Only used for similar comparable options that result in a quantitative benefit (eg lives saved in transport or Quality Adjusted Life Years for health proposals) Only used for similar comparable options that result in a quantitative benefit (eg lives saved in transport or Quality Adjusted Life Years for health proposals) Only used for options that provide similar intangible benefits (or utility). For example defence capability. Use multi-criteria analysis instead. Only used for options that provide similar intangible benefits (or utility). For example defence capability. Use multi-criteria analysis instead.
40
Presenting the Cost Benefit Analysis
Present Value of Marginal Benefits (m)
B/C ratio 1.0 (ie NPV0)
Benefits exceed costs
Aspirational Option
Do Min Option
Costs exceed benefits
Non-optimal Option
Present Value of Marginal Costs (m)
Status Quo Option
41
Analysing Intangibles
42
Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA)
  • A systematic process for ranking alternative
    proposals against decision-makers preferences,
    objectives and criteria

Pros Cons
Enables non-monetary impacts to be incorporated into the decision-making process But depends on subjective judgements of panel members
Can provide transparency and an audit trail But needs to be robust, eg criteria can overlap resulting in double-counting
More flexible than CBA and easy to implement But potentially less rigorous than a (good) CBA
43
How to Undertake the MCDA Workshop
The choice of stakeholder panel is critical as it
influences mix of preferences
Identify Stakeholder Panel
Identify Criteria
Criteria should be complete, assessable and
independent (to avoid double counting). Fewer is
better ie exclude redundant criteria and
cluster.
The panel should assign weights to each
criteria by its contribution to achieving the
investment objectives and value for money
Weight Criteria
For each criteria, the panel score each option (0
least preferred, 10 most) and then multiply by
the weight. To ensure scoring is objective and
consistent, use software tools that generate
numeric values by comparing elements pairwise.
(cf 1000 Minds Ltd, Catalyze Ltd, MACBETH
(process)).
Score Options
Examine Results
Test the robustness of the overall scoring. Does
it make sense - REALLY? Document to demonstrate
that the analysis is robust. Name the panel
members
44
Risk Analysis
45
Why Quantify Risk?
B/C ratio 3.0
Value of Marginal Benefits
B/C ratio 2.0
B/C ratio 1.0 (ie NPV0)
Option B high risk
Option A low risk
Present Value of Marginal Costs (m)
46
Managing Uncertainty
What is a Risk? ..the chance of something happening that will have an consequence on the achievement of proposal objectives (ie prevent, delay, degrade, enhance, create) Measured by consequence () and likelihood ()
What are our Choices for managing risk? To avoid it To mitigate it To transfer it or share it with another party To accept it
47
Categorising Risks against our Risk Tolerance
Profile
Almost certain High High Extreme Extreme Extreme
Likely Moderate High High Extreme Extreme
Possible Low Moderate High Extreme Extreme
Unlikely Low Low Moderate High Extreme
Rare Low Low Moderate High High
Insignificant Minor Moderate Major Catastrophic
Likelihood
Consequence
48
Why do we Identify and Quantify Uncertainty?
  • To evaluate the realism of our estimates of
    benefits, costs and timing (of deliverables,
    including scheduling risks)
  • To inform choices between competing short-listed
    options with different risk profiles
  • To inform trade-offs between different risk
    management strategies (eg to transfer or to
    accept)
  • To determine thresholds for triggering decisions
    to invest, to draw-down funding, to proceed (or
    NOT)

49
Attempts to Quantify Uncertainty
  • Discount Rate Adjustment
  • down-side only
  • impacts more on long-term cash flows
  • Optimism Bias
  • down-side only
  • lacks transparency if applied inside the CBA
  • attempts to value the cost of risk
  • Hi/Lo ranges
  • could be fit for purpose
  • could be linked to a confidence level (ie 90 of
    the time)
  • cant model interactions between different risks

50
Monte Carlo Analysis
  • What is Monte Carlo Analysis?
  • A quantitative risk modelling method
  • That aims to model the impact of varying key
    inputs on the outcome of the overall investment
  • When to use it?
  • simple techniques cannot adequately describe the
    range of possible outcomes
  • input variation significantly impacts on outcomes
  • input variation can be explained by a probability
    distribution
  • How .?

51
Input 1 Distribution Exchange Rates
  • Problem estimate variability over a 6-month
    period
  • Distributions fitted to historical rates, mean
    0.61

52
Outcome Distribution NZ Funding Gap
Mean 34.5m, Std Dev 1.5m, 95 of outcomes
below 36.9m
53
Project Mgt Triggering Decision Points
1.00
Consider termination above 95th percentile
0.95
Likelihood that project cost will be achieved
Cabinet approval required above 50th percentile
0.50
Joint Minister approval required above 25th
percentile
0.25
Department able to draw down cash to the 25th
percentile
0.00
36.9m
Mean 34.5m
34m
Total Project Costs (NZ millions)
54
Sensitivity Testing What if?....
  • Scenario Analysis
  • asks what if questions and recalculates the
    overall results
  • what if one or more sensitive/key variables were
    changed by 10?
  • 3 scenarios
  • pessimistic
  • most probable or base scenario
  • optimistic
  • Switching value
  • How much would a variable (eg the exchange rate)
    have to change to change the preferred option?

55
Planning for Procurement and Delivery
56
Detailed Business Case
Indicative Business Case
Case for Change
Revisit Case for Change
MCDA Options Workshop
Short-list Options
Economic Assessment
Non-monetary
Sensitivity Testing
Preferred Option
Risk Analysis
Commercial Case Workshop
Procurement Strategy
Procurement Plan
Funding Gaps
Indicative Costs
Financial Costing
Financial Case Workshop
Balance Sheet Analysis
Chief Execs Letter
Management Strategy
Project Mgt Plan
Change Mgt Plan
Mgt Case Workshop
Risk Mgt Plan
Risks
Benefits
Benefits Mgt Plan PIR
57
The Single Stage Business Case Roadmap
Case for change Workshop
Strategic Context
Options Workshop 1
Investment Objectives
Problems
Options Workshop 2
CSFs
Existing Arrangements
Business Needs
ILM Workshop 1 Problems
Scope
Long List Options
Constraints Dependencies
Initial Options Assessment
Economic Assessment
Sensitivity Testing
Non-monetary
Benefits
Benefits
Risk Analysis
Preferred Option
Benefits Risks Workshop
ILM Workshop 2 Benefits
Commercial Case Workshop
Procurement Plan
Risks
Financial Costing
Financial Case Workshop
Project Mgt Plan
Mgt Case Workshop
Change Mgt Plan
Risk Mgt Plan
Benefits Mgt Plan PIR
58
Commercial Case Preparing for the Potential Deal
  • Procurement strategy
  • Service requirements
  • Risk allocation
  • Payment mechanisms
  • Contractual and other issues
  • Workshop - with who?

59
www.Procurement.govt.nz 8 Step Guide to
Mastering Procurement
Detailed Business Case
60
Financial Case Ascertaining Affordability and
Funding Requirements
  • Assumptions (organisation perspective)
  • Financial costing model
  • Best estimates of expenditure less revenue
  • Balance sheet impacts?
  • Funding gaps (operating capital)?
  • Possible user charges?
  • Scenarios (high, med, low)
  • Contingencies
  • Chief Executives letter
  • Workshop with who?

61
Management Case Plan for Delivery
Project management strategy, methodology, framework, governance, project structure, reporting arrangements, milestones, key personnel, roles and responsibilities
Change management strategy, framework and change management plan
Benefits Management strategy, benefits map, benefits register (including owners), and realisation plan
Risk Management strategy, framework including embedding into business processes, risk register and reporting requirements
Post-project Evaluation process, timing and responsibility.
Chief Executives Letter formal assurance that the proposal and resource requirements are owned at a high level
Workshop With who?
62

Better Business Cases Investing for
change
Project Implementation Business Case
Programme Strategic Assessment
Programme Business Case
Project Strategic Assessment
Indicative Business Case
Detailed Business Case
Implementation Business Case
Single Stage Business Case
Project Strategic Assessment
63
Implementation Business Case
  • Purpose
  • Identify the supplier that offers the best value
    for money
  • Detail the negotiated and commercial and
    contractual arrangements
  • Confirm the proposed
  • arrangements are affordable
  • Organise the detailed management
  • and delivery arrangements

64
Implementation Business Case
Detailed Business Case
Indicative Business Case
Case for Change
Revisit Case for Change
Revisit Case for Change
Short-list Options
Preferred Option
Revisit Options
Evaluate Best Final Offers
Procurement Strategy
Procurement Plan
Issue RFI
Issue RFP
Negotiated Deal
Indicative Costs
Financial Implications
Financial Costing
(Finalise for implementation)
(Planning for delivery)
Project Mgt Strategy
Project Mgt Plan
Project Mgt Plan
Change Mgt Plan
Change Mgt Plan
Sign Contract
Risks
Risk Mgt Plan
Risk Mgt Plan
Benefits Mgt Plan PIR
Benefits Mgt Plan PIR
Benefits
65
www.Procurement.govt.nz 8 Step Guide to
Mastering Procurement
Implementation Business Case
66
Did we meet our Objectives?
  • To develop a working knowledge of the content and
    structure of the Detailed and Implementation
    business cases.
  • To develop the key skills required to develop a
    Detailed or Implementation business case by
  • Identifying monetary and non-monetary benefits
  • Identifying and presenting the preferred option
    by applying
  • cost benefit analysis (CBA)
  • multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA)
  • quantitative risk analysis (QRA)
  • To appreciate the importance of involving key
    stakeholders, customers and suppliers in the
    business case development process.
  • PARKING LOT?

67
Additional Background Information
  • Further background information on Better Business
    Cases, including guides, templates and links to
    related guidance and web-sites, is available at
  • http//www.infrastructure.govt.nz/publications/bet
    terbusinesscases
  • Further information on economic assessment tools
    is available at
  • http//www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/guidance/
    planning/costbenefitanalysis
  • http//wales.gov.uk/funding/wiipindex/5cmodel/?lan
    gen
  • http//www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/data_greenbook_index
    .htm
  • http//www.finance.gov.au/obpr/cost-benefit-analys
    is.html
  • A spread-sheet cost benefit analysis template is
    available at
  • http//www.tec.govt.nz/Tertiary-Sector/Crown-Inter
    est/Business-Cases/Step-Two--Business-Case-Develop
    ment/ 
  • 8 Step Guide to Mastering Procurement at
    www.Procurement.govt.nz

68
Where to get support?
  • For Better Business Cases guidance, templates and
    training programmes, the Treasury National
    Infrastructure Unit (NIU) web-site
    http//www.infrastructure.govt.nz/publications/bet
    terbusinesscases
  • For general Better Business Cases inquiries,
    email betterbusinesscases_at_treasury.govt.nz
  • For further detail on this training material
  • Lewis Weatherall
  • Senior Consultant
  • Mobile 0274 409706
  • Email lewis_at_weatherall.co.nz
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