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Beyond Compliance: Understanding the why

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Title: Beyond Compliance: Understanding the why


1
Beyond Compliance Understanding the whys of
decision-making in transition planning.
  • Dawn Breault CAGS, C.R.C.
  • NH Department of Education
  • Special Education
  • Technical Assistance Consultant
  • March 11, 2013

2
Assumptions
  • You are familiar with Indicator 13
  • You have been monitored or have a basic
    understanding of the Indicator 13 monitoring
    process.
  • You have a good understanding of the basics in
    transition planning.
  • You are looking for more information about
    transition planning beyond I-13.

3
You made it through Indicator 13! Now What?
4
Indicator-13 data
  • If you have been reviewed and didnt pass,
    reflecting on those areas and figuring out the
    next steps.
  • If you have not been reviewed yet, looking at the
    8 questions and reflecting on how your district
    handles the 8 areas.

5
Intent
  • When reflecting on the 8 areas it helps to look
    past the actual words of the requirement and
    consider the intent behind the requirement.

6
Intent example Invitation evidence
  • Is there evidence the student was invited to the
    meeting?
  • The intent is to ensure the student actually
    knows about their meeting and is invited.

7
Three types of issues when looking at program
improvement
  • Systemic
  • Administrative
  • Professional Development

8
Tackling the 3 issues
  • Systemic issues
  • Program development
  • Staffing
  • Resources
  • District policies or procedures.

9
Systemic
  • Buy in from Administration
  • Buy in from School Board
  • Buy in from Staff

10
Administrative
  • Setting up new procedures
  • Assigning a staff member to be responsible
  • Check and re-check that the process is being
    followed.
  • Invitations and prior permission could fall under
    this category.

11
Professional Development
  • Ensuring staff have been appropriately trained.
  • What type of pre-service training did the staff
    member have?
  • Does the district know the local community
    resources?

12
Considerations for improvement
  • Examining the competencies of the staff holding
    the key transition positions. (NSTTAC)
  • Evidence based practices (NSTTAC)
  • Morningstars quality indicators of exemplary
    transition programs (needs assessment).
  • Local resources (CoP, DOE TA)

13
Competencies who needs to know what?
  • No formal license or certification for transition
    personnel.
  • No official on-the-job training specific to
    transition.
  • Very few pre-service opportunities.

14
  • No one would propose keeping basketball players
    off the court until they had studied the game for
    12 years. Anonymous

15
NSTTAC what do we need to know?
  • What Transition Specialists Need to Know
  • What Secondary Special Education Teachers Need to
    Know
  • What State Agency Secondary Special Education
    Administrators Need to Know

16
  • Competencies broken down without resources
  • (See word document handout)

17
NSTTACs three competency areas are based on the
following
  • Based on the Division for Career Development and
    Transition's competency lists for secondary
    special educators (Blanchett, 2001) and
    transition specialists (DCDT, 2000), and the
    Council for Exceptional Children competencies for
    school leaders (CEC, 2008)

18
Big picture thinking
  • The following Evidence based practice examples
    from NSTTAC are mostly organized with Paula
    Kohlers Taxonomy in mind.

19
Taxonomy
  • In 1996 Dr. Paula Kohler developed The Taxonomy
    for Transition Programming as a Model for
    Planning, Organizing, and Evaluating Transition
    Education, Services, and Programs.
  • http//homepages.wmich.edu/kohlerp/pdf/Taxonomy.p
    df

20
NSTTAC's Definitions of Evidence-Based Practices
21
Examples of Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary
Transition
  • http//www.nsttac.org/content/evidence-based-pract
    ices-secondary-transition

22
Personnel Development Guide for Evidence-Based
Practices
  • http//www.nsttac.org/content/personnel-developmen
    t-guide-evidence-based-practices

23
Evidence-Based Practices and Predictors in
Secondary Transition What We Know and What We
Still Need to Know
  • http//www.nsttac.org/sites/default/files/assets/p
    df/pdf/ebps/ExecsummaryPPs20Jan2013.pdf

24
How do I know what my district needs?
  • You have assessed the districts I-13 data and
    need something more to help guide the next steps.
  • Following tool is very specific to transition
    program improvement.
  • Other ways to monitor overall program improvement
    (ABCs etc)

25
  • Quality Indicators of Exemplary Transition
    Programs
  • Needs Assessment Instrument
  • Developed by
  • Mary Morningstar
  • University of Kansas

26
  • This needs assessment is designed to allow
    programs, schools and districts to determine and
    prioritize the most critical needs within a
    transition program.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

27
  • This self-assessment is best utilized if multiple
    and representative groups of transition
    stakeholders complete the form (e.g., teachers,
    administrators, parents, others). The data for
    all representative groups is then compiled.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

28
7 Domains
  • Transition Planning
  • Family Involvement
  • Student Involvement
  • Curriculum and instruction is outcome-orientated
  • Inclusion in school and access to the general
    curriculum
  • Interagency collaboration and community services
  • Transition assessment
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

29
The document
  • http//transitioncoalition.org/transition/tcfiles/
    files/docs/Quality_Indicators_of_Exemplary_Transit
    ion_Programs1329845495.pdf/Quality_Indicators_of_E
    xemplary_Transition_Programs.pdf

30
The Indicators
  • Transition Planning
  • Family Involvement
  • Student Involvement
  • Curriculum and instruction
  • Inclusion
  • Interagency collaboration and community services
  • Transition Assessment
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

31
Transition Planning
  • Transition planning begins early in a student's
    educational experience (but no later than 16
    years old) and continues throughout a student's
    school career.
  • Transition plans are based upon person-centered
    planning approaches in which the student's
    strengths, capabilities, interests and
    preferences are identified.
  • Transition IEP outcomes and post school goals are
    based upon student strengths, interests and
    preferences.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

32
Transition Planning
  • The transition IEP identifies post school goals
    using appropriate transition assessments related
    to postsecondary education and training,
    employment and independent living skills.
  • The transition IEP identifies needed transition
    services and courses of study to assist the
    student in reaching his or her postsecondary
    goals.
  • Post-school outcomes data is collected for
    students who have exited school to track post
    school success and the effectiveness of the
    school-based transition planning process.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

33
Family Involvement
  • Family members (including extended family,
    friends and others if appropriate) regularly
    attend all transition planning meetings
  • Transition planning takes into consideration the
    impact of transition upon the family as a whole
    and not just focus exclusively on the needs of
    the student.
  • Family members are involved in all decisions that
    are made by the transition team.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

34
Family Involvement
  • Accommodations are made to involve family members
    in the planning process (e.g., time and location
    of transition planning meetings are flexible) and
    to include extended family members in meetings.
  • A process is in place so that family members,
    students and professionals reach consensus
    regarding transition outcomes and services,
    including the courses of study.
  • Information is provided in a variety of formats
    to families about transition planning, services
    and the IEP.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

35
Student Involvement
  • Students are taught decision-making skills using
    research-based curricula beginning as early as
    possible but no later than upon entering middle
    school.
  • Students are provided with opportunities to make
    real-life meaningful decisions so that they
    possess the skills necessary to make informed
    choices about their future.
  • Students are invited to and attend transition
    planning meetings and are active participants in
    the planning process.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

36
Student Involvement
  • Students are given opportunities to learn about
    and/or directly experience an array of post
    school outcomes.
  • Students are actively involved in developing
    their own transition IEP and are supported to
    lead their IEP meeting (e.g., self-directed IEP
    meetings).
  • Parents are provided with information about the
    importance of self-determination and
    self-advocacy for transition.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

37
Curriculum is Outcome-Orientated
  • Appropriate academic instruction is provided to
    prepare students for functioning in their
    community, including attending post-secondary
    education.
  • Appropriate vocational instruction is provided,
    including community-based vocational experiences,
    to prepare students for community employment.
  • Appropriate instruction and opportunities to
    engage in independent living is provided to
    prepare students for functioning as young adults
    in the community.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

38
Curriculum is Outcome-Orientated
  • Appropriate social/interpersonal skills
    instruction and opportunities to establish social
    relationships with peers is provided.
  • Teaching takes place in natural and
    age-appropriate settings including community
    settings. This would include post-high school
    (postsecondary) settings for students aged 18-21
    still receiving special education services.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

39
Inclusion in school and access to the general
curriculum
  • Specific strategies exist for facilitating the
    social inclusion of students with disabilities
    into regular school programs, activities, and
    extra-curricular activities
  • Teachers in regular academic and vocational
    courses are provided with assistance of special
    education services to adapt their instruction and
    curriculum to meet the diverse needs of students
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

40
Inclusion in school and access to the general
curriculum
  • A process is in place and used by IEP teams to
    make decisions about each students educational
    program that takes into account both unique
    student learning needs and access to the general
    curriculum.
  • Accommodations for supplemental services to
    support students in the general curriculum are
    identified on the IEP and used in an ongoing
    basis within the general curriculum.
  • Appropriate accommodations are included in the
    IEP in order for students to fully participate in
    state and district-wide assessments.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

41
Interagency Collaboration and Community Services
  • School-business partnerships and linkages exist
    and promote effective employment opportunities
    for students.
  • A process is in place for schools and agencies to
    determine the anticipated service needs of
    students in transition from school to adult and
    community services.
  • Services and supports are available to facilitate
    formal and informal natural support networks and
    community connects for students with
    disabilities.
  • Accurate information about the range of community
    services exists and is available to students and
    families.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

42
Interagency Collaboration and Community Services
  • Agencies develop written interagency agreements
    to identify roles and responsibilities regarding
    exchanging information, sharing of resources and
    coordinating services.
  • The school district has at least one professional
    responsible for coordinating transition services,
    and in particular, working with outside agencies
    to identify barriers to effective services and to
    plan for improving transition and community
    services.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

43
Transition Assessment
  • Formal and informal assessment measures are
    available to school staff in order to develop
    transition plans that target post-school goals
    and outcomes (e.g., employment, postsecondary
    education, independent living).
  • Transition assessment procedures are customized
    for each student so that specific information is
    collected regarding student needs, post-school
    goals and individual preferences and interests.
  • Assessment procedures and methods are matched to
    the learning and response characteristics of each
    student.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

44
Transition Assessment
  • Assessment procedures include multiple and
    ongoing activities and methods that sample
    critical transition behaviors and skills.
  • Procedures are in place to present transition
    assessment results to students, families and
    staff and to incorporate critical information
    throughout the transition planning process.
  • For students graduating or exiting special
    education services, a summary of academic
    achievement and functional performance with
    recommendations for meeting postsecondary goals
    is developed and shared.
  • Mary E. Morningstar, Ph.D., University of Kansas

45
Summary sheet from survey
  • Adding up scores and setting priorities.
  • What can realistically be done?
  • Is the issue systemic?
  • Is the issue administrative?
  • Is the issue one of professional development?

46
Next Steps
  • Im a (teacher, case manager, transition
    counselor) how can I possibly make these types
    of changes?
  • Baby steps pick one thing that you have control
    over.

47
Hudson Example
  • 39 Transition assessment procedure in place to
    present transition assessment results to
    students, families and staff and to incorporate
    critical information throughout the transition
    planning process.
  • Partially achieved eval. review meetings, exit
    meetings (SOP)
  • Baby steps starting with one population
    significantly impaired.

48
Transition Portfolio
  • Resume
  • List of work experiences
  • Pictures on work sites
  • Work site summaries from job coaches/paras
  • References
  • SOP
  • Gmail account
  • Upload all documents so its always there.

49
Local Resources
  • NH DOE Technical Assistance
  • NH Community of Practice (State and Regional)
  • Modnadnock Center for Successful Transitions
  • Transition Resource Network at Strafford Learning
    Center
  • SPDG NH DOE

50
Questions?
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