Social Studies Grade Six Theme One Our system of government - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Social Studies Grade Six Theme One Our system of government


1
(No Transcript)
2
Our System of Government
Making the Laws of The Bahamas
Ministry of Education B.E.S.T. Bahamas Education
School Technology Project P.O. Box N3919 Nassau,
Bahamas
3
Vocabulary
  • Unconstitutional- against the law
  • Debate- to discuss something
  • Media- different means of communicating, for
    example radio, television, newspaper
  • First Reading- term to describe introduction of a
    Bill to Parliament
  • select committee- government committees elected
    to study a parliamentary bill
  • Act of Parliament- Bill that has been officially
    approved to make it a law

4
Why Are Laws Made?
  • In Commonwealth countries, and in a number of
    other countries, there are two types of law
    common law and statue law.
  • Common law is unwritten law, while statue law is
    written down.
  • Laws can also be subdivided into civil and
    criminal laws.
  • Civil law deals with disputes between private
    citizens.
  • Criminal law concerns offences punishable by the
    State.

5
How Are Laws Made?
  • When the government decides that a new law is
    needed, the minister who is responsible for the
    department that proposes the new law, discusses
    it with government lawyers, called legal
    craftsmen, whose special task it is to write
    laws.
  • They must make sure that the new law follows the
    rules of the constitution.

6
How Are Laws Made?
  • If it does not, it would be
  • unconstitutional, and could not be
  • enforced.
  • Also, the new law must not conflict with
  • any existing laws.
  • Many Bahamian laws are based on
  • British laws.
  • While our laws are written in English, it is
  • not a form of English that we usually use.
  • They are written in legal language, which
  • has its own vocabulary and special
  • meanings.

7
How Are Laws Made?
  • When the intended new law, called a Bill, has
    been drafted the lawyers in the cabinet study it
    carefully.
  • If they do no think the Bill is worded correctly
    they return it to the legal draftsmen for
    re-writing.
  • When the wording of the Bill satisfies the whole
    cabinet, copies are made and passed to other
    people in Parliament to review it.

8
How Are Laws Made?
  • The minister whom the Bill most concerns gives
    Parliament notice that he wants MPs to discuss or
    debate the Bill at a later sitting.
  • It is read by Parliament for the first time. This
    is the First Reading of the Bill.
  • From this time copies of the Bill are available
    for all MPs to study.

9
How Are Laws Made?
  • By the time the Bill comes for debate in the
    House of Assembly, the public will have learnt
    about it from the media (newspapers, radio and
    TV).
  • This helps MPs to find out what people feel about
    the Bill.
  • When a law is very important and complicated,
    there ay be a long period between its First
    Reading and parliamentary debate.

10
How Are Laws Made?
  • The discussion in Parliament begins when the
    minister asks for the Bill to be read a second
    time.
  • He or she explains why the government feels the
    law is necessary, and may give examples of how
    people have been affected because the law does
    not yet exist.

11
How Are Laws Made?
  • If the opposition agrees on most points with the
    government, there is little debate, but when a
    Bill is very important, and people have very
    different views about it, there will be a great
    deal of discussion.
  • A Bill is usually read three times before it is
    passed.

12
How Are Laws Made?
  • Sometimes a Bill is referred to a special group
    of people a select committee, for further study.
  • At the end of the debate a vote is taken and, if
    the majority of MPs are in favor of the Bill, it
    is passed to the Senate for final approval.
  • When the Bill has been approved, it is signed by
    the Governor-General, and becomes an Act of
    Parliament.
View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Social Studies Grade Six Theme One Our system of government

Description:

Title: Social Studies Grade Six Theme One Our system of government Author: Administrator Last modified by: Dcampbell Created Date: 4/30/2007 4:41:00 PM – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:70
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 13
Provided by: weeblyCom
Learn more at: http://aiaprimaryschool.weebly.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Social Studies Grade Six Theme One Our system of government


1
(No Transcript)
2
Our System of Government
Making the Laws of The Bahamas
Ministry of Education B.E.S.T. Bahamas Education
School Technology Project P.O. Box N3919 Nassau,
Bahamas
3
Vocabulary
  • Unconstitutional- against the law
  • Debate- to discuss something
  • Media- different means of communicating, for
    example radio, television, newspaper
  • First Reading- term to describe introduction of a
    Bill to Parliament
  • select committee- government committees elected
    to study a parliamentary bill
  • Act of Parliament- Bill that has been officially
    approved to make it a law

4
Why Are Laws Made?
  • In Commonwealth countries, and in a number of
    other countries, there are two types of law
    common law and statue law.
  • Common law is unwritten law, while statue law is
    written down.
  • Laws can also be subdivided into civil and
    criminal laws.
  • Civil law deals with disputes between private
    citizens.
  • Criminal law concerns offences punishable by the
    State.

5
How Are Laws Made?
  • When the government decides that a new law is
    needed, the minister who is responsible for the
    department that proposes the new law, discusses
    it with government lawyers, called legal
    craftsmen, whose special task it is to write
    laws.
  • They must make sure that the new law follows the
    rules of the constitution.

6
How Are Laws Made?
  • If it does not, it would be
  • unconstitutional, and could not be
  • enforced.
  • Also, the new law must not conflict with
  • any existing laws.
  • Many Bahamian laws are based on
  • British laws.
  • While our laws are written in English, it is
  • not a form of English that we usually use.
  • They are written in legal language, which
  • has its own vocabulary and special
  • meanings.

7
How Are Laws Made?
  • When the intended new law, called a Bill, has
    been drafted the lawyers in the cabinet study it
    carefully.
  • If they do no think the Bill is worded correctly
    they return it to the legal draftsmen for
    re-writing.
  • When the wording of the Bill satisfies the whole
    cabinet, copies are made and passed to other
    people in Parliament to review it.

8
How Are Laws Made?
  • The minister whom the Bill most concerns gives
    Parliament notice that he wants MPs to discuss or
    debate the Bill at a later sitting.
  • It is read by Parliament for the first time. This
    is the First Reading of the Bill.
  • From this time copies of the Bill are available
    for all MPs to study.

9
How Are Laws Made?
  • By the time the Bill comes for debate in the
    House of Assembly, the public will have learnt
    about it from the media (newspapers, radio and
    TV).
  • This helps MPs to find out what people feel about
    the Bill.
  • When a law is very important and complicated,
    there ay be a long period between its First
    Reading and parliamentary debate.

10
How Are Laws Made?
  • The discussion in Parliament begins when the
    minister asks for the Bill to be read a second
    time.
  • He or she explains why the government feels the
    law is necessary, and may give examples of how
    people have been affected because the law does
    not yet exist.

11
How Are Laws Made?
  • If the opposition agrees on most points with the
    government, there is little debate, but when a
    Bill is very important, and people have very
    different views about it, there will be a great
    deal of discussion.
  • A Bill is usually read three times before it is
    passed.

12
How Are Laws Made?
  • Sometimes a Bill is referred to a special group
    of people a select committee, for further study.
  • At the end of the debate a vote is taken and, if
    the majority of MPs are in favor of the Bill, it
    is passed to the Senate for final approval.
  • When the Bill has been approved, it is signed by
    the Governor-General, and becomes an Act of
    Parliament.
About PowerShow.com